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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TEUSTEES 
January 22, 194-3, 10:30 A.M., State House, Boston 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



1501 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Hubbard, Desmond, 
Haigis, Cole, Brett, Carmichael, 
Whitmore, Boyden, Mrs. Leach, 
Mrs. McNamara, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 



It "was 



VOTED: To dispense with reading of the call and 
of minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett appointed the following committee to 
wait upon the Governor. Trustee Carmichael, Chairman, Trustees 
Haigis and Brett. 

The Chairman appointed the following Nominating Committee, 
Trustee Whitmore, Chairman, Trustees Boyden and Mrs. McNamara. 

His Excellency Pvobert F. Bradford, Governor of the 
Commonwealth and President of the Board of Trustees, was escorted 
to the chair by Dr. Carmichael ' s committee and on invitation from 
Chairman Bartlett said that he would like to hear the annual report 
of President Van Meter. 

Dr. Van Meter presented his annual report and the 
Governor congratulated him on his excellent statement. He said 
that he would like to be able to stay for the rest of the meeting 
but that his appointments would not permit. 

Several of the Trustees spoke of the excellent report 
which President Van Meter had presented and requested that mimeo- 
graphed copies be submitted to the "Ways and Means Committee and to 
the Trustees as soon as possible. 



President's 
Annual Feport 



1502 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Vhitmore of the Buildings and Grounds Committee 
presented recommendations as a result of meeting of his committee 



TRUSTEE 



Colonial Oil 
Company- 
Standard Oil 
Company of 
New Jersey- 



Engineering 
Laboratory- 



Architect, 
Louis W. Ross 



on January- 21. These recommendations were considered and acted 

upon individually by the Trustees as indicated below. On 

recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds Committee, it was 

VOTED : To assent to the assignment of perpetual 

right and easement to lay and maintain two 
pipe lines across premises of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Waltham Field 
Station at Waltham as granted to Colonial 
Beacon Oil Company under date of August 31> 
1944 to Standard Oil Company of New Jersey 
and to authorize the Treasurer to execute 
assignment in the name of and for the 
Board of Trustees. 

% 

On recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds Committee, 



it was 



VOTED : To approve plans for the Engineering 

Laboratory Building and to authorize the 
Treasurer to sign construction contract 
for, tnis building in the name of and for 
the Board of Trustees. 

On recommendation of Buildings and Grounds Committee, it 



was 



VOTED : To apjflpove replacement of the Federal 
Works Agency building lost by fire by 
construction of" a one-story, fire proof 
structure, measuring 100 by 168 feet, 
and located approximately on the founda- 
tion of the old building. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter and 

Treasurer Hawley, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Louis W. Ross as architect for 

this building and to authorize the Treasurer 
to execute contract for plans and con- 
struction of such building in the name of 
and for the Board of Trustees if and when 
funds are provided. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley reported that since meeting of the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee, he had talked with the Public 
Works Commission and the Commission is willing to provide funds 
for architectural services. 

On the recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, it was 

VOTED ; To approve location of faculty housing units 
to be constructed by the Alumni Building 
Corporation on a self-liquidating basis on 
the tract of land owned by the University 
situated north and west of Butterfield 
Terrace and known as the Baker lot - such 
action to take precedence over previous 
actions governing use of this area. 

Un the recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, it was 

VOTED : To approve cons tract! on by the Alumni Build- 
ing Corporation of three dormitories in the 
Women's area in the northern part of campus 
to be used temporarily by men students but 
eventually to become women's dormitories, and 
to approve construction of a fourth dormitory 
if funds are sufficient to be located in the 
Men's housing area. 

The Trustees specified that this vote was for general 

location of buildings but that the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds is to give further study to the type of buildings to be 

constructed and to retain power of recommending new sites should 

the type of construction selected warrant reconsideration of the 



location. 



On the recommendation of Buildings and Grounds Committee, 



it was 



VOTED: To approve location of two additional cement 
block dormitories for the housing of men stu- 
dents to be located west of Federal Circle. 



1503 



Faculty 
Housing on 
Baker Lot 



Dormitories 



Cement Block 
Dormitories 



1504 



TRUSTEE 



Dining 

Commons 



Appointments 



Richard C. Folej 

sabbatical 
leave 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, it was 

VOTED ; To approve location of a proposed Dining 

Hall Commons in the area just north of the 
Experiment Station Headquarters Building. 

It was also 

VOTED : To refer to the Executive Committee with 
power appointment of an architect for the 
Dining Hall Commons. 

Dr. Hubbard presented recommendations resulting from 

meeting of the Trustee Committee on Faculty and Program of Study, 

January 21, and on recommendation of this committee, it was 

VOTED: To appoint the following seven persons to 
the grade of Professor. 

Alfred A. Brown to Professor of Agricultural 
Economics effective February 1, 194-3. 

Allen E. Andersen to Professor and Head of 
Department of Mathematics effective 
February 1, 194-3. 

Maxwell H. Goldberg to Professor of English 
effective February 1, 194.8. 

Clarence H. Parsons to Extension Professor 

of Dairy Husbandry effective February 1, 1943. 

Franklin W. ^outhwick to Research Professor 
of Pomology effective January 1, 194-3. 

Ellsworth H. Wheeler to Extension Professor 
of Entomology effective January 1, 194-8. 

Merit P. White to Professor of Civil Engi- 
neering effective February 1, 1943. 

On recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Faculty 

and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED: To grant sabbatical leave to Richard C. Foley, 
Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry on the 
six months, full-pay basis beginning August 1, 
1943, so that he may study for a doctor's de- 
gree in the field of Dairy Husbandry. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTE D: To approve the following new courses of 
study. 

Home Economics 55. (I) CHILD NUTRITION. — A study is made 
of nutritional needs from prenatal life through infancy and 
childhood. Methods of judging nutrition and causes and 
effects of malnutrition are discussed. Menus for children 
and measures to insure the consumption of optional diets 
are put into practice with laboratory work in the nursery 
school. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3« 

Prerequisites, Home Economics 52 and 54-. 

Home Economics 57. (I) CLOTHING SELECTION AND SIMPLE 
CONSTRUCTION, (for non-majors) This course is designed to 
stimulate an interest in good workmanship. Emphasis is 
given to construction techniques such as fitting, pattern 
use and altering. Special attention is given to speed and 
independence of work. 

2 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 2. 

Home Economics 33. (II) APPLIED DEESS DESIGN. — Costume 
design by drawing and draping, using textures of unusual 
nature. Emphasis will be placed on fitting and adapting 
design to figure. 

3 2-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3« 
Prerequisite, i*ome Economics 37, or its equivalent. 

Political Science 67. (I) INTERNATIONAL GOVERHMEHT (194-3- 
4-9). — A study of world organization in the twentieth 
century, with emphasis upon the League of Nations, the 
World Court, and the United Hations and its affiliated 
agencies. Given in alternate years. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Political Science 68. (II) INTERNATIONAL LAW (194-3-4.9). 
A study of the origin and character of international law, 
and its functions in the relations between national states. 
Given in alternate years. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Geology 50. ENGINEERING GEOlOGi. — A general course in 
engineering geology stressing earth structure, the dynamic 
processes, and agents of weathering. The laboratory work 
consists of mineral and rock-determination and map reading 
as related to the phenomena of physical geology. 
2 class hours; 1 3-hour- laboratory period. Credit, 3- 



1505 



New 
Courses 



1506 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

forestry 27. (1) CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RSSOJRSES. — 
The use of natural resources of the United States including 
soil, water, minerals, forests, grasslands and wildlife. 
Includes discussions of the historic background and past 
and present use of basic natural resources in relation to 
social and economic welfare. 
Juniors and Seniors mav elect. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Forestry 72. (II) FOREST-ANIMAL RELATIONSHIPS. — Effects 
of animals on the forests. Also the effects of forest 
oractices on wild animal production. Economics aspects of 
forest-animal relationships. Open to forestry majors only. 
3 class period. Credit, 3« 

Spanish 73- (I), 74 (II) THE GOLDEN AGE (1949-50). -- 
Readings from Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderon, Garcilaso 
and others. Composition and conversation. Given in alter- 
nate years. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3. 
Br erequi sites, Spanish 7 and 3. 

History 81. (I) DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 
1776-1900. — The history of American foreign policy and 
its basic factors to the end of the nineteenth century. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3. 
Prerequisites, History 59 and 60 or the consent of the 
instructor 

Psychology 23 (II) ADVANCED GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. — A de- 
tailed consideration of some of the major problems of 
psychology. Topics considered include motivation, emotion, 
neural relationships, learning, perception, and sensory 
processes. Stress is placed on methodology, theoretical 
implications, and recent investigations. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, Psychology 26. 

Sociology 73, (11) CRIMINOLOGY. — A study of the nature 
of crime and the factors underlying criminal behavior. 
Attention is also given to the machinery of justice in 
criminal behavior; the law, the courts, police enforce- 
ment, penal and correctional institutions. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisites, Sociology 28 and 75. 

English 83. (I) TECHNICAL WRITING. — A course in factual 
and inductive exposition with special emphasis upon process 
reports and thesis preparation. For juniors and seniors in 
the School of Engineering. 

2 class hours. Credit, 2. 

Prerequisites, English 1 and 2. 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley reported on expenditures from Trust 

Funds by the President over the past year in the amount of 

$553.49, and it was 

VOTED : To approve these expenditures and to authorize 
the President to expend an amount not to exceed 
$600 from Unearaarked Trust .bunds during the 
calendar year beginning January 1, 194.3. 

it was 



VOTED: 



To approve and ratify actions of all committees 
of the Board since the date of the last annual 



meeting. 



Treasurer Hawley reported that board rates are now $8.50 

per week at Draper Hall and $9.00 per week at Butterfield and 

Qreenough. The rates were raised 50 cents a week beginning 

September 1, 194-7 but still the University is not meeting its costs 

of food and labor. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve increase in Boarding Hall rates 
from $3.50 to $9.00 per week at Draper Hall 
and from $9.00 to $9.50 per week at Butter- 
field and Greenough Halls, - the new rates 
to be effective February 4, 194-3. 

Treasurer Hawley said that at the recent meeting of the 

Executive Committee, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sutanit a 
deficiency budget to the legislature in 
the amount of $24J-,64£>. 

One of the items making up this deficiency budget was re- 
placement of the building lost by fire in the amount of $131,000. 
Since that time the Treasurer has talked further with the Public 
Building Commission. The Commission estimates that $7,000 addi- 
tional will be needed to replace the building. After discussion, 
it was 



1507 



Unearmarked 
Trust Funds 



Board Rates 



Deficiency 
Budget 



1508 



TRUSTEE 



Treasurer's 
Annual Report 



Nominating 
Committee 



Committees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To approve a deficiency budget in the amount 
of $248,64.0 as against $241,640 as pre- 
viously authorized by the Executive 
Committee. 

Chairman Bartlett asked whether each member of the Board 

had received copy of the annual report of the Treasurer and whether 

any member of the Board had question to raise concerning any part 

of the Treasurer's report. There being no questions, it was 

VOTED : To approve the report of the Treasurer for 
the year ending June 30, 1947 as presented. 

Trustee Whitmore reported for the Nominating Committee, 

and it was 

VOTED: To accept the report of the Nominating 

Committee and to direct the Secretary to 
cast one ballot for officers and committee 
members for 1948 as follows. 

President, Robert F. Bradford 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bartlett 
Secretary, James W. Burke 
Treasurer, Robert D. Hawley 

Committee on Faculty and Prog r am of Stu dy 

Leonard Carmichael, Chairman Clifford C. Hubbard 
Frank L. Boyden Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 

Harry D. Brown Richard Saltonstall 

John J. Desmond 

Committee on Extension Service 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara, Chairman John J. Desmond 
Frank L. Boyden Ernest Hoftyzer 

Harry D. Brown Mrs. Joseph S. Leach 

Fred E. Cole Richard Saltonstall 



Committee on Experime nt Station 
Alden C. Brett, Chairman 
Fred E. Cole 
John M. Deely 
Ernest Hoftyzer 



Clifford C. Hubbard 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 

Philip F. *hitmore 



Comm ittee on Agriculture and Horticulture 

Richard Saltonstall, Chairman Fred E. Cole 

Frank L. Boyden John M. Deely 

Harry D. Brown Mrs. Joseph S. Leach 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Leonard Carmichael 
John M. Deely 

Com mittee on Finance 

John V. Haigis, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Ernest Hoftyzer 

Committee on Legislation 

Ralph F. Taber, Chairman 
Harry D. Brown 
John W. Haigis 

Executive Committee 

Joseph V, T . Bartlett, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Leonard Carmichael 



John Haigis 
Clifford C. Hubbard 
Mrs. Joseph S. Leach 
Ralph F. Taber 



Richard Saltonstall 
Ralph F. Taber 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Ernest Hoftyzer 
Clifford C. Hubbard 
Mrs. Elizabeth L. 
McNamara 

Mrs. Joseph S. Leach 
Philip F. Whitmore 



President Van Meter announced that the college budget would be 
heard by the Ways and Means Committee on Monday, January 26. 
Chairman Bartlett invited members of the Board to attend the hearing 
to support the University budget. Mr. Haigis said that he would 
be glad to submit letter to the Ways and Means Committee in 
support of the budget as he would be unable to attend in person. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00 P.M. 




Chairman 



ecretary 



1509 



Budget 



1510 



TRUSTEE 



Ralph A. 
Van Meter 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

April 29, 1948, 5:00 P.M., Parker House, Eoston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Erett, 

Brown, Carmichael, Chandler, Kaigis, 
Hoftyzer, Hubbard, Mrs. Leach, 
Mrs. McNamara, Sal tons tall, Taber, 
whitmore, Acting President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED: 



To dispense with reaaing of the call and 
with reaaing of the minutes of the last 



meeting. 



Chairman Bartlett called upon Dr. Boyden to present re- 
port of the Committee on Nomination of a President for the Universi- 
ty. Dr. Boyden said that the Committee consisting of Trustees 
Bartlett, Brett, Carmichael, Taber, WMtmore, and Boyden had held 
many meetings and interviewed many candidates not only from New 
England but from the entire country. He saia that he had never 
served on a Committee which had done a more thorough job. The 
Committee began by asking Dr. Van Meter to accept the presidency 
because of hi? outstanding qualifications for the position. 
Dr. Van Meter at first had refused the position but had agreed to 
serve as Acting President until the Committee could find a 



^T 



resident. The Committee had then had to search for a candidate. 
In all its interviews the Committee had failed to find a man 
better qualified than Dr. Van Meter and so they turned to him 
again recently and he has accepted the offer. 

Chairman Bartlett said that Dr. Van Meter has done an 
outstanding job as Acting President and he felt that the Committee 
was fortunate in convincing him that he should accept the position. 
It was unanimously 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To elect Dr. Ralph A. Van Meter as President 
of the University of Massachusetts effective 
April 29, 1943. 

It was 

VOTED: To request the Chairman to appoint a Committee 
to plan inauguration ceremonies to be neld in 
the fall of 1943. 

(Note) : The Chairman later appointed the follow- 
ing Committee: 

Dr. Leonard Carmichael, Chairman 

Alden C. Brett 
Ralph F. Taber 
Joseph V. Bartlett, ex officio 

The Chaiiman requested that Dr. Van Meter appoint a 

campus committee including the Secretary of the Board as one of its 



members . 



Di . Van i'ieter said that he accepted with appreciation the 



honor conferred upon him by the Board, that he appreciated that 

there is a tremendous job to be done within the next two or three 

years, and that he will do his best to meet the challenge of the 

position. 

Upon the recommendation of the Faculty Committee on 

Honorary Degrees and of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To award the following honorary degrees at 
the June Commencement in 194.3: 

Herbert K. Hayes '08 - Doctor of Science 
Louis M. Lyons '13 - Doctor of Humans Setters 
Harlan P. Kelsey - Doctor of Science 
Julian S. Eaton '93 - Doctor of Laws 

Upon the recommendation of Dr. waiter S. Ritchie, Head 

of the Department of Chemistry, Fred J. Sievers, Director of the 

Experiment Station, and President Van Meter, it was 



1511 



Ralph A. Van Meta 
President of the 
University 



Inauguration 
Committee 



Honorary- 
Degrees 



1512 



Mack Drake — 
Research Professor 
of Chemistry 



TRUSTEE 



Frank C. Moore 
Emeritus Professor 
of Mathematics 



Appointment 
Form 



Title - Head of 
Depaittnent instead 
of Chairman of 
Department 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To approve appointment of MacK. Drake as 

ssearch Professor of Chemistry effective 
July 1, 1948. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

! ;OTED: To elect Frank C. Moore who retired as 
Head of the Department of Mathematics 
on January 31, 194-3 Emeritus Professor 
of Mathematics. 

There >»as discussion of the form used by the University 

for appointment of members of the professional staff. Chairman 

Bartlett said that there were some legal questions involved and 

after discussion, it was 

VOTED : To empower Chairman Bartlett and President 
Van Meter to prepare a new form to be used 
for appointing members of the professional 
staff. 

Dr. Van Meter said that in 194-5 the University began a 
trial of abolishing the title Head of Department and the extra 
|300 salary which the title carried in favor of a new title of 
Chairman of the Department — as Department Meads retired their 
successors were appointed as Chairmen. However, this has not 
worked too well, particularly since many of the Department Heads 
have responsibilities not only for resident instruction but for 
direction of the work of Extension Specialists and research 
personnel. Plecently, the Educational Policies Council of the 
University voted in favor of restoring the oia title of Head of De- 
partment and Dr. Van Meter recommended that the Trustees authorize 
him to return to this usage. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to return to the 
title Head of Department and discontinue the 
title Chairman of the Department. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Van Meter recommended establishing of a Department of 
Zoology ana Physiology and the appointment of Dr. Gilbert L. 
Voodside as Head of the new department effective July 1, 194# » He 
said that Zoology is currently administered by Dr. Woodside but is 
not a separate department, Dr. 'Woodside being under the Head of the 
Department of Entomology and Zoology. The work in Zoology has in- 
creased considerably in the past decade to the point where the 
Head of the Department of Entomology, who is also Dean of the 
School of Science, recommends that Zoology should be freed from 
Entomology. Early this year Dr. George E. Gage, Head of the De- 
partment of Physiology, died which leaves Physiology at the present 
time without a heaa. Dr. Van ^eter said that under this proposed 
combination, Zoology and Physiology could go forward in a better 
way than in the past. This combination is common in most of the 
land-grant colleges in the country. The proposed plan has been 
approved by the Educational Policies Council of the University and 
by the officers of the administration. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to establish a 
Department of Zoology and Physiology and 
to appoint Dr. Gilbert L. Woodside as Head 
of the Department effective July 1, 194-3. 



1513 



Department of 
Zoology 



Treasurer Hawley presented a progress report on the 
University building program. (See attached copy). He said that de-j Buil 
lay in delivery of steel will cause completion dates to be later 
than those indicated on the attached report. 



Treasurer Hawley said that there has been request from 
those interested in shade trees for further expansion of the work 
in Dutch Elm Disease control at the University. There is no space 
available for expansion of the laboratories and the only way to get 



Gilbert L. 
Woodside, Head 
of Department of 
Zoology 



Program 



Pre-fabricated 
structure for 
Dutch Elm 
Disease control 



1514 



TRUSTEE 



Naval Research 
Program in 
Supplementary 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

additional space is to put up a building. Those in charge of the 

laboratory feel that if an expanded program is desired by the 

people of the State, the building should be provided very rapidly 

and for this reason they recommend a pre-fabricated structure. 

It is proposed to erect a pre-fabricated vooden builaing just north 

of Clark Hall (present headquarters for Dutch Elm Disease work) 

and attached to Stockbridge House which is a vooden building. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the administration to request 

$20,000 from the Legislature for the purpose 
of erecting a pre-fabricated structure for 
expanding the work in Dutch Elm Disease con- 
trol and to authorize the administration to 
constrict this building as indicated on site 
plan prepared by Professor Otto dated 
April 9, 1943. 

It was further 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to execute con- 
tracts for the construction of this build- 
ing in Lhe name of and for the Board of 
Trustees. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that representatives of the 
United States Navy have suggested that the University undertake a 
program of naval research projects estimated to cost $12,000 during 
the fiscal year beginning July 1. The University would be re- 
imbursed in full by the Government but an appropriation to finance 
the work originally would be required. Dr. Van Meter said that 
the research is largely in the field of Chemistry. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Administration to include a 

request for $12,000 in its Supplementary Budget 
to cover original cost of the proposed Naval 
Eesearch program with the understanding that 
the University will be reimbursed for this ex- 
pense by the Federal Government. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the services of the archi- 
tect for the Physics Building are needed in connection with plans 
for equipment to be installed in the building. The architect has 
proposed a basis for his employment for this additional service and 
this has been approved by the Public Builaing Commission. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED: To approve amendment of contract with Kilham, 
Hopkins and Greeley (architects for Physics 
Building) dated September 16, 194-6, to provide 
for additional services of the architects in 
the preparation of plans and specifications for 
installed equipment for the builaing at a fee 
of ?2 percent of purchase price and to authorize 
the Treasurer to execute said amendment to con- 
tract with Kilham, Hopkins and Greeley in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that in accordance with 
customary procedure under the Agency Agrement with the Springfield 
Safe Deposit and Trust Company for custody of invested endowment 
funds, the company has requested confirmation by the Full Board of 
Trustees of actions of the Finance Committee for changes in securi- 
ties during 194-7. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To confirm the following actions of the Finance 
Committee regarding investment of endowment 
funds during 194-7: 

a. February 5, 1947 

VOTED : To authorise the Treasurer to sell the 
following stocks and bonds; 

$2400 Columbus Venetian Stevens of '55 ) 

12 shares ,T " » stock ) $1,725.25 

65 shares Community Public Service Stock 2,091.4-1 



1515 



Physics 
Building 



Endowment 
Funds 



1516 



TRUSTEE 



0. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sell 

£15,000 U.S. Treasury 2j f s of 1972/67 
to provide funds for the loan to Kappa 
Sigma fraternity ($24,000) as voted 
above and to authorize him to withdraw 
from savings bank accounts such further 
funds as may be required for this loan. 

(in accordance with this action funds 
were withdrawn from the Springfield 
Safe Deposit and Trust Co. as follows: 

March 25 

April 11 

June 27, 1947 (by mail poll) 

VOTED : To purchase $3,000 Great Northern 
R.R. 3 l/S's of '90 
$2,000 Louisville & Nashville R.R. 
2 7/3' s of 2003 



September 17, 1947 (by mail poll) 



VOTED: To purchase $2,000 Great Northern 
R.R. 3 1/3 's of e 90 
$2,000 Louisville & Nashville R.R. 
2 7/3' s of 2003 

d. Called Bonds during 1947 

June 13 5 M New England Power Ass'n 
5t T s of 1954 

July 2 4 M Public Service Co. of Col. 
3j T s of 1964 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:30 P.M. 






$15,464.06 



16,195.1 



9 



3,316.66 



3,110.3 







1,940.53 



2,030.6 



5 



1,930.53 



5,050.00 
4,169.14 



s* 



. Us^A ^Xu t< Chair 



man 



Secretary 









I 



UNIVERSITY OF. MASSACHUSETTS 
BUILDING PROGRAM ~~ PROGRESS REPORT 



k^ under Construction 

1. Home Eoonomios 

P~E6 131*1-86 

2. Physios Building 

P~j8ll 8113-07 

3* 3 Cement-Blfc. Bldgs. 

u~i 8113-03 

4, Engineering Lab c 

U-2 8ll>04 
(165 days) 

5, Additional Boiler 

U~3 8U3-05 

6, 5th Alusni Dora*, 



Coat 



Bids 



Construct ion 

Started 



Contract 
Completion 
Date 



$6^3,750 28 Feb. a 47 25 Har.^7 
Completion expected by Aug. 15 5 48 

518,000 31 Deo- u 47 9 Feb. *48 
Up to Schedule ~ steel may delay 

522,000 10 Nov. *47 12 Nov. °^7 
Completion expected Sept- 1*48 

42^,000 5 Mar, »l*8 5 April ***8 
Because of probable steel delay, 
completion expected °ot. 15 3 ^8 



5^,500 6 Feb, 
Up to schedule. 



IS 



1 April a 48 



*K>0,000 (a) March *kQ 

Completion expected hj Sept* 



1 June J 48 

21 Sept, f, 48 
11 June b ^6 
Zk Sept. me 

22 Sept. ''48 
Sept, »W 



In Plans 



8. 

9 

10 

11, 






2 Cement-Blko Bldgs 
3513-^5 

Central Garage 
3513-66 



350,000 22 April ***8 

Expect to award contract by Kay 15, 
which should ma&s completion date Sept* 17* 

120,000 6 May a 48 

Expect to award contract by May 27, 
which should make completion date Sept, 29- 



6-7-8 Alumni Dorms, 1,000,000 {a) 



Alumni Faculty 
Housing 

Animal Disease lab, 
P-E12 8113-08 



500,000 (a) 16 June l1 48 

^75*000 

Expect to advertise in June .— 
•construction approximately 12 mos 



1; 


>c 


Waltham Field Sta. 
Building 


275,000 

Expect to advertise in July 
nine months for construction. 


13= 


Dining Commons 


750,000 Cb) 


14. 
1 


Power Plant and 
Utilities Services 


1,170,000 (b) 




> V 


Engineering Building 


1,136,000 (b) 



Total 



,338,250 

;.:.. .■■:, g=s 



as 



Febe ' 49 



Alumni Building Association Fund©* 

Plans made or in process, but construction funds not appropriated. 



1517 



5TEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 5, 1948, 11:00 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 

Chairman Eartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Whitmore, 

Taber, Haigis, Deely, Brown, Saltonstall, 
Chandler, Desmond, Mrs. Leach, 
Mrs. McNamara, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawiey, Secretary Burke 

It was 



VOTED : To waive reading of the call and the minutes 
of the last previous meeting. 

On the recommendation of the President and Faculty of 

the University, it was 

VOTED: To award the degree Bachelor of Science to 

those candidates listed on the attached pro- 
gram; to award the degree Bachelor of Arts 
to candidates for that degree as listed be- 
low; to award the degree Bachelor of Voca- 
tional Agriculture to those candidates listed 
below; and to award the degree Bachelor of 
Landscape Architecture to candidates for that 
degree as listed below. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Degrees 



Summa Cum Laude 



John J seph Martin 



Irving Abraham Ratner 



Glenna Gibbs Cady 
William Leon Courchene 
Jeannette Ann Cynarski 



xMagna Cum Laud e 



Alfred Lorenzo Duquette 
George Epstein 
Elizabeth Louise Kobak 



M. John Markuson, Jr. 



Priscilla Winslow Baldwin 

Lucille Frances Blakeslee 

Saul Cohen 

Raymond Charles DeYoung 

Evelyn Downing 

Phyllis Elaine Goodrich 

Alphonse Joseph Jackowski 

Max Klein 

Joseph 



Cum Laude 

John Robinson Lawrence 
Anita Evelyn Mann 
Elmer C. Martirson 
John Walter Mastalerz 
Herbert Ernest Shepard 
Edward Merrill Smith 
Calvin Stevens 
^Walter Richard Trespasz 
Veretelnyk 



1518 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Warren Earl Anderson 
Lillian Jackson Archer 
Thomas James Army- 
Mary Elizabeth Avery 
Pauline Baihes 
Marilyn Margaret Baker 
Raymond Henry Balise 
Judith Rachel Bazol 
Stanley Francis Berdahowski 
Arthur Henry Beyer 
Miriam Biletsky 
Thomas Kent Bliss, Jr. 
Josephine Gertrude Bloniarz 
Virginia Kathryn Boski 
Edward Joseph Bourdeau 
Donald Clinton Broderick 
Barbara Ann Brouillet 
Eunice June Brunell 
Lillian Dorothy Buczoki 
George Daniel Butler, Jr. 
John Warren Cadorette 
Martha Jean Caird 
Raymond William John CampbellEleanor Gotz 



Rite 

Priscilla Elliot Farquharson 
*George Lyle Fearnley, Jr. 
Melvin Harold Feffer 
Carolyn Jean Felton 
Martha Maria Flint 
Elva Marie Foerster 
Donald Haines Fowler 
Mary Alice French 
Estelle Marie Frenette 
Mischa Elliot Friedman 
William Hall Fuller- 
James William Fulton 
William Henry Gaylord, Jr. 
Jerome Herbert Geller 
Ralph Glover Gilman, Jr. 
Donald Waiter Glaser 
Robert Edward Glendon 
George Goldin 
William Joseph Good, Jr. 
Elizabeth Ann Goodall 
Janet Goodman 
Herman Bernard Gottesman 



Ramona Card 

Janet Elizabeth Carey 

George Albert Chase 

Maribeth Chase 

Annella Platts Card Chatel 

George Cohen 

Philip Hillier Cole 

Ruth Lucille Cook 

Barbara Cooper 

John Francis Crosby 

Ann Marie Crotty 

Thomas Aloysius Culbertson, 
-"-Stanley Marshall Daggett 

Leroy Edson Darling, Jr. 

Marion Gloria Day 

Robert William Day 

Robert Joseph Deltour 

Gerald Arthur Derosier 

Francis deVos 
^•Robert Edward Dillon 

Walter Edward Dinn 
-*James Lockett Dinsmore 

George William Doten 

Gerrit Duys, Jr. 

John Lawrence Dwyer 

Laura Adams Easland 
^Richard Bourne Elberfeld 

James Francis English 

Robert Epstein 

Jane Patricia Evans 



Margaret Ann Grayson 

Harold Lester Greenberg 

Isabel Frances Greenbush 

Frederick Francis Guyott, Jr. 

Peter J. Hahn 

Edward Duncan Hall 

Romaine Ash Hass 

Shirley Margarete Hawkes 

Anne Mary Heffron 

Mary Therese Hill 

Eleanor Jean Hinsley 
.'Edward Wilson Hitchcock 

Everett Francis Horgan 

William Austin Hosmer 
*Milton Albert Howe, Jr. 

Melvin Hutner 

Barbara Dorothy Hyndman 

David F. Jackson, Jr. 

Henry Harvey Jackson, Jr. 

Donald Stanley Jacobs 

Edith J. Jaffe 

Brooks Rockefeller Jakeman 

Helen Ann Jameson 

Frederick Lockhart Jones 

Lillian Ruth Jones 

Nelson Vayo Jones 

Richard Peter Joyce 

Virginia Louise Julian 

Elliot J. Kaplan 

M. Milton Kaplan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



J. t) xy 



Ida Marie Kelley 
John William Kelly- 
John Edwin Keough 
Robert Howard King 
Edith Dover Klein 
Lillian Krikorian 
David Kronick 
Myron Balph Laipson 
John Edward Lambert 
Paul A. Lane 
Miriam Lapides 
John Hart LaRochelle 
Donald Stuart Lauder 

*David Frederidk Leland 
Adeline Lois Leonard 
Jerome Sinclair Levine 
Richard Levine 
William Ernest Litz, Jr. 
John Albert Ludeman 
Catherine Magiopoulos 
George Maturniak 
Daniel James McCarthy 
Daniel Jerome McCarthy 

-"-Roger David McCutcheon 
Mary Winifred McKinstry 
Theodora Basil Melahouris 
William Roberts Merrill 
Evelyn Mesnick 
Walter Eugene Mientka 
Homer Ossian Mills, Jr. 
Lorane Margaret Moir 
Richard Louis Muri 
Eugene Murphy 
Francis Joseph Murphy, Jr. 

-*John Joseph Murphy 
Barbara Marianne Nahlovsky 
Haig Najarian 
William Henry Needham 

^Ismail Niknejad 
Richard A. Norton 
Mary Elizabeth O'Neill 
Teresa Marie Orlandella 
Daniel Francis O'Shea 
Edward Joseph Otero 
Robert Dwight Pease 
David Pimentel 
Elliott Walter Porter 
Melvin Sylvester Preble 
Samuel Edwin Price 
Pauline Emma Richard 
Alden Dary Ridley 
John Pliny Rose 
Almon Orcutt Ruggles 
Alfred Paul Runminger 



Ruth Lois Russell 

William Francis Ryan 

Theodore St. Palley 

Leslie Vincent Savino 

John F. W. Schulze 

Luella Doris Sedgwick 

Helen Terese Sellew 

Jean Patricia Semon 

John Ward Shannon 

Harvey Seymour Shapiro 

Ruth Cullen Shea 
-*Roy Edward Sigafus 

Beryl Simmons 

Edward Harvey Simon 

Sheldon Sumner Simon 

Ann Louise Sizer 

Rachel Smith 

Sidney Solomon 

Bertram Irving Sparr 

Samuel Spiegel 

Edward Dubois Sprague 

Bernard LeRoy Stead 

Charles H. Stebbins 

Helen May Steliga 

Lois Evelyn Stetson 

Robert Armour Stevens 

Howard Denison Stowe 

Norman John Sullivan 
-"-Rufus Russel Summarell 

Helen Patricia Symonds 

Pauline Ann Tanguay 

Thelma Ruth Tarlow 

Betty Lu ToLman 

Adriana Jeannette VanaerPol 

Joanna Waite 

John Olin Walker 

Marcia Rosalie Walker 

Alan Satterlee Warden 

Elizabeth Anne Warner 
*Phyllis Houran Warner 

John Philip Watson 
-*Dobson Lindley Webster 

Arthur Francis White, Jr. 
*Harold Bancroft White, Jr. 

Hazel Isabelle White 

Julian Justin Wilk 

Richard Arnold Williams 

Nathan Bernard Winstanley, Jr. 

Paul Wolf Winston 

Barbara Lois Wolfe 

Barbara Doris Wolkowich 

Robert Leonard Wroe 

Alice Pauline Wysocki 

Gertmde Bernice Yarchin 



1520 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Fred Ziman Faidolph Robert Zuccaro 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
Sumraa Cum Laude 
Elinor Gertrude Galusha 



Magna Cum Laude 



David Bur res 

Lois Marilyn La Salle 



Margaret Ella Peck 
Avrom Nathan Roram 



Zelda Janet Shoenberg 

Cum Laude 

Frances Amelia Gobbi Charles F. Rockey 

Ernest Marvin Henken Barbara Jane Stegner 

Maija Annabell Honkonen Harriet Elaine Sternberg 

William Arthur Howes Walter Frank Tauber 

Leonard Seymour Zahn 



Frances Sanderson Archibald 
Harriet Osborn Bates 
Jean Bayles 
Bernard Bennett 
Paul William Bernstein 
Shirley Elizabeth Better 
Erwin Seymour Bilsky 
Carl G. Brenner 
Louise Brisset 
John L eland Brown 
Phyllis Eileen- Brunner 
Daniel Fred Burgess 
Robert Kenneth Butler 
Shirley Jude Carey 
Martha McAfee Chapin 
Patricia Ann Clancy 
Joseph Caiman Cohen -* 
Claire Margaret Comrao 
Barbara Jane Cooley 
Priscilla Helen Cotton 
Jacqueline Lorraine Couture 
Roberta Lillian Curtis 
Phyllis Ann Cushman 
Stephen Walter Czarnecki 
-^Barbara Ann Daley 
John Robinson Davenport 
Jane Katherine Duffy 
Edward Clinton Edwards, Jr. 
Chester Edward Falby 
Edmund Farinha 
Robert Edward Fein 

* Name later changed to Casden 



John Ralph Garbutt, Jr. 
Betty Gerber 
Warren Philip Gingras 
Samuel Glass 
Irving Goldblatt 
Arnold Jason Golub 
Robert Danton Gordon 
Bernard Greenberg 
Lorraine Mae Guertin 
Roger Earle Halvorsen 
Marjorie Hulburd Hamlin 
Elaine Marian Handlin 
Florence Dorothy Healy 
Ruth Lillian Herrmann 
Thelma Kagan 
Jewel B. Kaufman 
James Hammerle Keefe 
Doris May Kennedy 
Forrest Leonard Kenyon 
Anne Margaret Keough 
Maurice Gabriel Kolovson 
Ursula Ruth Kronheim 
James Joseph Laliberte 
Matthias Lasker 
William Edward Lucey 
Robert Edmund Lynch 
Constance Marie Mangum 
Jacqueline Gladys Marien 
Rose-Marie Alice Marten 
Joseph Henry Masterson, Jr. 
Alice Friel McNally 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1521 



Mary Ellen Miller 
Raquel Isa Moldaw 
Robert Frank Mount 

-Arnold Hovatt Murray, Jr. 
Alice Carolyn Northup 
Alvan Jerome Obelsky 
Joan Smith Perns tein 
Robert Edwin Pierce 
John Coleman Powers 
Mary Quirk 

--Anthony James Randazzo 
Lois Marie Ransom 
Ruth Regina Raphael 

---Eugene Lloyd Ratner 
Jeanne Rheaume 
Carroll Francis Robbins 
Ricnard Charles P.oberson 
Jean Alice Roberts 
Antonetta Ella Romano 



Wayne H. Ross 
Shirley Salsman 
Albert Vincent Scalingi 
David Stoddard Secor 
Esther Shub 
Frances Siagel 
Hope Anita Simon 
Paul Edmund Smith, Jr. 
*Joyce Mary Spencer 
---Janet Mallon Stedman 
Donald Nelson Stewart 
Mary Elaine Stewart 
Edward Robert Szetela 
Gordon Alan Taylor 
Marjorie Myra Terry 
Ronald Lawrence Thaw 
Melba Constance Trott 
Marcia Elizabeth Van Meter 
Coolidge Whitman Wood 



-"- As of the Class of 1947 
# As of the Class of 194-3 



CANDIDATE FOn DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 

---William Otho Drinkwater 



* As of the Class of 1947 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE AP.CHITECTURE 



Albert Sloan Beecher 
James Anderson Block 



Thomas Joseph Kane 
Robert Ernest Klein 



On the recommendation of the President and the Faculty 

of the Graduate School, it was 

VOTED : To award the degree Master of Science to 

those candidates listed below and to award 
the degree Doctor of Philosophy to the 
candidates listed below. 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENoE 



Ira Werner Albrecht 
David Werner Anderson, Jr. 
Philip Brigham Anderson 
John Petri e Ball 
Fernand E. Bartlett 
Garland Booker Bass 
Adele Blossom Bitcover 



Lois Elizabeth Brow 
Stanley William Bubriski 
Theodore Arthur Calianos 
Goon Lee Chin 
William Eric Clark 
Robert Emmett Cleary, Jr. 
Edward I. Coher 



1522 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 
Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Carroll Vernon Cole 
Frank Herbert Dalton 
Norman Wilfred Desrosier 
Irving Seymour Fagerson 
Gordon Field 
Joanne Ruth Freelander 
John Davidson Gould 
Malcolm Graham 
Harold Emory Griffin, Jr. 
Kir by Maxwell Hayes 
George Edward Higgins 
Calvin Henry Hood, Jr. 
Milton Albert Howe, Jr. 
Warren Irving Johansson 
William Joseph Jordan, Jr. 
Omer Kosker 
Edward Peter Larkin 
John Vincent Lembach 
Warren Litsky 
Robert Scott Lloyd 



David Henry Marsden 
Joseph Annibal Masi 
Edward Anthony Nebesky 
William Brown Nutting 
Stanley Edwin Polchlopek 
Edwin Wesley Pullen 
Calvin Luther Rasmus sen 
Jean Reese 

Patience Monteith Sanderson 
Theodore Alexander Saulnier,Jr 
Robert Francis Savitt 
Robert Eugene Scott, Jr. 
Arthur Ellis Sullivan 
Richard Merrill Swenson 
Jesse Alderman Taft 
Marco Antonio Tio 
Ivan Hope Tomlinson 
Norman Alfred Vanasse 
Philip William Vetterling 
Paul Arthur White 



CANDIDATES FOn DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Sherman Gilbert Davis 
Robert Earle Evans 
Arthur Milton Kaplan 
Cornelius Crawford Lewis 
Victor Marcus Lewis 



Ricardo Millares Sotres 
Roy Earl Morse 
Mohammed Sayeed Quraishi 
Courtney Emery Walker 
Anne Williams Wertz 



Trustee Whitmore presided during the following vote: 



It was 



VOTED : To award honorary degrees at the Commence- 
ment on June 7, 194-3 as follows: 

Herbert Kendall Hayes - Doctor of Science 
Harlan Page Kelsey - Doctor of Science 
Louis Martin Lyons - doctor of Humane Letters 
Julian Stiles Eaton - Doctor of Laws 
Joseph Warren Bartlett - Doctor of Laws 

Treasurer Hawley reported progress on the University* s 

building program as follows: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Building Program - Progress Report 



Cost 



Bids 



Con- Contract 
struction Comple- 
Started tion Date 



JL Q&{j 



Building 
Program 



A. Unaer Construct ion 

1. Home Economics, 

P-E6 1341-36 

2. Physics Building 

P-Ell 3113-07 



$643,750 28 Feb.' 47 25 March '47 1 June' 48 
Completion expected by 8/15/48 

$518,000 31 Dec. '47 9 Feb. '48 21 Sept. f 43 
Steel delivery 6/l5 - 6 weeks delay 



3. 3 Cement-Block Build-$522,000 10 Nov. '47 12 Nov. ' 47 11 June 
ings U-l 3113-03 Completion expected 9/1/48 



4. Engineering Lab. 

U-2 3113-04 
(165 days) 

5. Additional Boiler 

U-3 3113-05 

6. 5th Alumni 
Dormitory 



$424,000 5 Mar. '43 5 April'48 15 Oct. 1 
Because of steel delay, completion 
expected IO/15/48 

$ 54,500 6 Feb. '48 1 Apr. '48 22 Sept. 
Up to schedule 

$400,000 (a) March'48 Sept. '48 

Construction now at first floor 



'43 



# 



43 



7. 2 Cement-Blk. Bldgs. $350,000 22 Apr. '43 21 May '48 25 Sept. 
3513-65 



Central Garage 
3513-66 



M-20,000 6 May '48 15 June '48 24 Sept. 
Contract now in process - materials 
being ordered 



(a) Alumni Building Association Funds. 

B... In Plans 
9. 6-7-3 Alumni Dorms $1,000,000 (a) 

10. Alumni Faculty Hous- $ 500,000 (a) 16 June '48 

ing 

11. Animal Disease Lab. 

P-E12 8113-03 



Feb. '49 



12. Waltham Field Sta- 

tion Building 

13. Dining Commons 

14. Power Plant and 

Utilities Services 



$ 475,000 

Expect to advertise in June - con- 
struction approximately 12 months 

$ 275,000 

Expect to advertise in July - nine 
months for construction 

$ 750,000 (b) 

$1,170,000 (b) 



15. Engineering Build- $1,136,000 (b) 

ing 

Total 



$8,333,250 

(a) Alumni Building Association Funds 

(b) Plans made or in process, but construction funds not 
appropriated . 



48 



43 



1524 



TRUSTEE 



New 
Buildings 



Hasbrouck 
Laboratory 



Gunness 
Laboratory 



r'aige 



Laboratory 



Cement Block 
Dormitories 



Mills 
House 



University 
Apartments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Van Meter said that he had recently 
appointed a Committee to suggest names for new buildings. This 
Committee was composed of Sumner Parker, Clark L. Thayer, "William 
L. Doran, Frank Prentice Rand, and Miss Helen Curtis. The 
Committee met with Departments concerned and has made recommenda- 
tions which the President approves. After discussion and on the 
recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED ; To name several new buildings as follows: 

1. Physics Building to be named Hasbrouck 
Laboratory in honor of Philip B. 
Hasbrouck, teacher of Mathematics and 
Physics 1895-1923, Fegistrar 1905-1923. 

2. Engineering Laboratory Building to be 
named Gunness Laborator y in honor of 
Christian I. Gunness, teacher of Engi- 
neering from 1914.-194.6, and Head of 
Division of Engineering. 

3. Animal Pathology Building to be named 
Paige Laboratory in honor of Dr. James 
B. Paige, teacher of Veterinary Science 
1390-1921; also member of Experiment 
Station staff and Chairman of Division 
of Science. 

4-. The cement block dormitories to be 

named for counties as follows: Berks hire, 
House, Hampshire House, Pl ymouth House, 
Suffolk House, Middlesex House . 

5. The new men's dormitory being constructed 
by the Alumni Building Corporation to be 
named Mills House in honor of George F. 
Mills, teacher of English 1399-19U, 
Treasurer, Head of Division of Humanities, 
Dean. 

6. The Faculty housing unit to be built by 
the Alumni Building Corporation to be 
named University Apartments . 

There was discussion as to handling of leases for the 
additional dormitories to be constructed by the Alumni Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Corporation, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Executive Committee to 
approve and authorize from time to time 
leases of land to, and leases of buildings 
from, University of Massachusetts Building 
Association within the limits from time to 
time authorized by law. 

Treasurer Hawley discussed with the Board the need for 
authorization of contracts for buildings about to be constructed. 
He said that the capital outlay budget about to be considered by 
the Legislature includes an item of $1,170,000 for construction of 
a new Power Plant and for extension and improvement of utility 
services. Plans and specifications for the Power Plant were pre- 
pared under auspices of the Emergency Public Works Commission 
immediately following the war by E. C. Brown Company of Boston. 
Plans for the extension and improvement of utility services were 
prepared by Hollis French of Boston. On the recommendation of the 
Treasurer and President, it was 

VOTED: If and when funds are appropriated for con- 
struction of a new Power Plant and improve- 
ment of utility services, to employ E. C. 
Brown Company as supervising engineer for 
the Power Plant and Hollis French as super- 
vising engineer for utility services and to 
authorize the Treasurer to execute necessary 
contracts for engineering services and con- 
struction of these facilities in the name of 
and for the Board of Trustees. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that capital outlay budget 

also includes an item of $1,136,000 for construction and equipment 

of a Main Engineering Building. The architectural firm of 

Appleton & Stearns of Boston is now employed as architect for the 

construction of the Engineering Laboratory Building and has made 

preliminary plans for the Main Engineering Building, since this is 

to be closely correlated with the laboratory building. On the 



1525 



Leases of 
land and 
buildings 



Power 
Plant 



■ 



Engineering 
Building 



1526 



TRUSTEE 



Dining 
Commons 



Cavalry- 
Stable - 
addition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

recommendation of the Treasurer and the President, it was 

VOTED : If and when funds are appropriated for the 
construction of the Main Engineering Build- 
ing, to employ Apple ton & Stearns as archi- 
tect and to authorize the Treasurer to exe- 
cute contracts for architectural services 
and construction in the name of and for the 
Board of Trustees. 

The Treasurer said that the third major item of the 
capital outlay program is the Boarding Commons for which $750,000 
has been requested. The Trustees have already appointed the firm 
of Maloney & Tessier of Springfield as architect for this build- 
ing and preliminary plans are being prepared. On the recommenda- 
tion of the Treasurer and President, it was 

VOTED : . If and when appropriations are available 

for the construction of a Boarding Commons, 
to authorize the Treasurer to execute 
necessary contracts for architectural ser- 
vices and construction in the name of and 
for the Board of Trustees. 

The Treasurer said that the fourth major item of the 
capital outlay program is $65,000 for the construction of an addi- 
tion to the present Cavalry Stable and for alterations of the 
present structure to accommodate the new equipment and program of 
the mechanized ROTC. On the recommendation of the Treasurer and 
President, it was 

VOTED : If and when appropriation is made available 
for construction of the Cavalry Stable and 
additions thereto, to refer to the Executive 
Committee of the Board approval of an archi- 
tect for the project and approval of con- 
tracts for construction. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Treasurer and President, 



it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Buildings & Grounds - 

Committee of the Board to approve for the 
Board final plans and specifications for 
the following four projects: 

1. Power Plant and Utility Services 

2. Main Engineering Building 

3. Boarding Commons 

U* Reconstruction of Cavalry Stable 

The Trustees recessed for luncheon at 12:10 and resumed 
the meeting at 3:30 P.M. 

On the recommendation of the Treasurer and President, 

it was 

VOTED : To continue the same dormitory rental 

schedules as authorized last year, which 
for self-liquidating dormitories are $150 
for normal occupancy and $120 where addi- 
tional students are housed in the same 
quarters . 

The Treasurer and President recommended an adjustment in 

the rental rates at Abigail Adams Hall to bring rates there in 

line with other rates and, it was 

VOTED : To increase rental rates at Abigail Adams 
Hall from $115 to $120 per year for normal 
occupancy and from $92 to $100 per year 
where additional students are housed in the 
same quarters. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize rental of rooms in the cement 
block dormitories at a rate of $120 per 
year for normal occupancy. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize rental rates in the cement block 
apartment buildings at $35 per month for two 
room apartments and $4.5 per month for three 
room apartments. 



527 



Dormitory 
Rentals 



Abigail Adams 
Hall - rental 
rates 



Cement Block 
Dormitories - 
rental rates 



Cement Block 
Apartments - 
rental rates 



1528 



TRUSTEE 



Richard C. Foley 



sabbatical leave 



G. T. Klein 



sabbatical leave 



Frank R. Shaw 



sabbatical leave 



Promotions - 
Mars ton, G.A. 
Brown, R.R. 
Hardy, H.E. 
Weaver, /W.H. 



A. A. Mackimmie 



retirement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To approve sabbatical leave for Richard C. 
Foley for one year beginning September 1, 
19-43 at half pay to study for the Ph.D. de- 
gree in Animal Husbandry in accordance with 
understanding as to the usual conditions for 
sabbatical leave. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To approve sabbatical leave for Professor 

G. T. Klein of the Extension Service on full 
pay for the following periods — May 194-3 - 
1 week; August 1-15, 1943; October 1-15, 1943; 
February 10-25, 1949; June 1949 and 6 weeks 
during July and August of 1950. During this 
time Professor Klein will study poultry pro- 
duction methods in other states and abroad in 
accordance with understanding as to the usual 
conditions for sabbatical leave. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To approve sabbatical leave for Frank R. Shaw 
for the first semester of the college year be- 
ginning September 1949 at full pay, to travel 
and visit other laboratories where beekeeping 
is conducted and taught in accordance with 
understanding as to the usual conditions for 
sabbatical leave. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To promote George A. Mars ton from Acting Dean 
to Dean of Engineering; to appoint Robert R. 
Brown to Head of the Department of Electrical 
Engineering; to appoint Harold E. Hardy as 
Professor of Business Administration; to 
appoint William H. Weaver as Professor of 
Mechanical Engineering. 

President Van Meter announced retirement of A. Anderson 

Mackimmie as of September 30, 194-3, and it was 

VOTED : To elect Professor Mackimmie Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of History on the date of his retire- 
ment. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To authorize establishment of a School of 
Business Administration. The President 
pointed out in this connection that the 
Trustees have already approved a curriculum 
in Business Administration and have 
authorized granting the degree of Bachelor 
of Business Administration. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that Frank H. Plumb of the 
class of '92 had died and in his will named the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts as residual legatees of his estate. 
Mr. Plumb named Raymond B. Kelsey as executor of the estate. 
Mr. Kelsey has declined to act in this capacity. The lawyer for 
the estate has suggested that in the event the University or the 
Trustees do not care to act as executor they assent to the appoint- 
ment of Lucius Plumb, Vice President of Bankers Trust Company of 
New York as executor. Mr. Lucius Plumb is not related to Frank H. 



Plumb. 



It was 

VOTED : That the Trustees are unwilling to take upon 

themselves the administration c.t.a. or other- 
wise of said estate and they and it renounce 
all right to such administration or otherwise 
and they hereby request that Lucius H. Plumb 
be appointed as administrator c.t.a. of the 
said estate of the said Frank H. Plumb. 

It was also 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sign in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees 
necessary documents to carry out the above 
action. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 



1529 



School of 

Business 

Admi ni s t ra t i on 



Frank H. Plumb 



will 



Treasurer - 

sign 

documents 



1530 



TRUSTEE 



Academic 

Activities 

Coaches 



July 
meeting 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: To authorize payment from Student Trust 
Funds of annual extra compensation for 
the following members of the staff as 
recommended by the Faculty Academics 
Activities Board and endorsed by the 
President: 

H. Leland Vartey $75-00 

Doric Alviani 200.00 

Leonta G. Horrigan 75-00 

Charles N. DuBois 75.00 

Arthur B. Musgrave 75 • 00 

Arthur E. Niedeck 150.00 

Lawrence S. Dickinson 150.00 

It was 

VOTED : To meet at the President's Office at the 
University on Wednesday, July 23, at 
11:00 A.M. to consider the budget for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 19-49 « 

The meeting was adjourned at J+:10 P.M. 



'Chairman 



.Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
July 28, 194-3, 11:00 A.M., Butterfield House, Amherst 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Desmond, Chandler, 
Brown, Taber, Haigis, Brett, Boyden, 
Whitmore, Hubbard, Mrs. McNamara, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED: To disoense with reading of the call and with 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

President Van Meter reviewed the procedures by which the 
Administration arrives at a budget to present to the Board. He 
said that requests emanate from the various departments of the 
University, are consolidated by the Deans and Directors into 
school budgets and budgets for the Extension Service and Experiment 
Station. These budgets then come to the President, Treasurer, and 
Secretary who review them with the Dean of the University and the 
Director of Experiment and Extension. The figures arrived at in 
these final conferences are those presented to the Trustees. The 
budget had been submitted to all members of the Board in writing 
one week before today's meeting. 

At the request of Chairman Bartlett, the Trustees con- 
sidered first the list of capital improvement items. The Trustees 
were asked to raise question on any particular iten and as 
questions were raised, they were answered by the college officers 
present. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To approve a capital outlay program for 1950 
in the amount of $3,954,550; in 1951 of 
|1,635,000; in 1952 of $2,555,000; in 1953 of 
$3,550,000; in 1954 of $1,650,000. 



So 



Capital 
Outlay 



1532 



TRUSTEE 



School of 

Veterinary 

Medicine 



Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was considerable discussion of a request in 1953 
of $2,500,000 for a school of veterinary medicine. It was pointed 
out that such school would be extremely expensive and question was 
raised as to whether such school was needed. Dr. Van Meter pointed 
out that if the University is to have a veterinary school at all, 
it should be a first rate school. There is no place in the country 
any more for second rate schools. The Land-Grant College Associa- 
tion has gone on record warning land-grant colleges against de- 
velopment of schools of veterinary medicine to meet a temporary 



need. 



In this discussion it was brought out that the Univer- 



sity of Connecticut has undertaken a School of Veterinary Medicine, 
that one such school is all that is needed in New England, and it 
might be far less expensive and more satisfactory for the State of 
Massachusetts to send its students to Connecticut than to develop 
a school here with little demand and limited opportunity for 
placement of graduates. 

None the less it was felt the item should remain in the 
budget until more is known of the developments in Connecticut and 
what part Massachusetts may wish to play in cooperating with 
Connecticut. 

The Trustees then considered the maintenance budget of 
the University for Administration, Instruction, Extension Service, 
Experiment Station, Control Services, Operation of Plant, and 
Boarding ^all. The Chairman encouraged questions on any and all 
items and after discussion, it was 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To authorize the Administration to submit a 
budget for the University for 1950 totaling 
$5,036,358 divided as follows: 



Admi ni s tra ti on 
Instruction 
Extension Service 
Experiment Station 
Control Services 
Operation of Plant 
Boarding Hall 



$ 181,520 

2,210,207 

276,476 

U0,760 

234,635 

1,013, HO 

675,120 



lOOO 



The Trustees raised question as to the reason for the 
large amount of money spent on temporary positions as against perma- 
nent positions. President Van dieter pointed out that for the past 
two or three years since the inauguration of Devens, the "Ways and 
Means Committee has felt that the University has a temporary over- 
load of students and therefore has set up only temporary positions 
in order to be able to withdraw them as the veteran load declines. 
The President said that while there undoubtedly will be a decline 
in the first two years after the veterans leave, this will rapidly 
be made up because of the increasing demand on the part of the 
civilian students for admission to the University. After discussion, 
it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to request con- 
version or as many of the temporary positions 
as he feels will be required permanently into 
permanent positions. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chairman to appoint a delegate 

to represent the Board of Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at the annual meeting of 
the Governing Boards of Land-Grant Colleges and 
Universities. Chairman Bartlett appointed 
Trustee Whitmore as delegate. 

President Van ^eter announced that Dr. Hugh P. Baker has 

offered to present to the University his personal Forestry library, 

The President said that this is an unusually good collection of 



Temporary 
Positions 



Assoc, of Goverc 
ing Boards - 
Vhitmore, Philip 
F. 



Eaker, Hugh P. 



1534 



TRUSTEE 



French, Arthur P 



Korson, J. Henry- 



Staple ton, 
Herbert N. 



Vhite, Harold A, 



Caldwell, 
Theodore C. 



Gamble, Philip L 



Hand, Frank 
Prentice 



Fraker, Charles F 
Julian, Arthur N. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

workvS on Forestry. It was 

VOTED: To accept Dr. Baker 1 s gift with appreciation. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the following promotions: 

Arthur P. French from Professor to Head of Department 
of Pomology effective September 1, 194-3 . 

J. Henry J^orson from Assistant Professor to Professor 
of Sociology on the retirement of Dean Mackimmie on 
or about September 15. 

Herbert N. Stapleton from Research Professor of Agri- 
cultural Engineering to Head of Department effective 
September 1, 194-3. 

Harold A. White from Assistant Professor of Floriculture 
to Professor effective July 1, 1943. 

Theodore C. Caldwell from Professor to Head of Depart- 
ment of History on retirement of Dean Mackimmie on or 
about September 15, 1943. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To appoint Philip L, Gamble, Head of the De- 
partment of Economics, as Acting Dean of the 
School of Business Administration at no in- 
crease in salary effective July 1, 194-3. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To confirm Frank Prentice Rand as Head of the 
Department of English and to appoint him Act- 
ing Dean of the School of Liberal Arts on the 
retirement of Dean ri ackimmie about September 15, 
1943. 

On the recommendation of President Van i'leter, it was 

VOTED,: To appoint Charles F. Fraker as Head of the 
Department of Romance Languages and Arthur 
N. Julian as Head of the Department of German 
at no increase in salary until increased 
salaries are obtained in the budget, appoint- 
ments to take effect July 1, 1943. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve leave of absence for one year at 
half salary beginning September 15, 194-3 
for Tena Bishop for the purpose of study at 
Columbia University in accordance with the 
usual terms of sabbatical leave. 

President Van Meter said that the supplementary budget as 
approved by the Legislature included promotions for Harley A. 
Leland and Ea^le H. Nodine, Associate Professors in 4--H club work 
to the grade of Professor. As all appointments in the grade of 
Professor or above need Trustee approval, he wished to bring these 
names before the Board. Chairman Bartlett asked whether the 
special committee appointed by the Trustees a year ago to study 
promotions in the Extension staff had recommended these promotions. 
The President said that the committee had recommended promotions to 
the grade of Associate Professor and that these promotions were 
accomplished a year ago. The committee had not recommended promo- 
tion to the grade of Professor. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: Not to approve these two promotions because 
they were not recommended by the Trustee 
committee which made a special study of Ex- 
tension Service personnel. 

Treasurer Hawley explained that Public Law #796 of the 
30th Congress authorizes the transfer to educational institutions 
of temporary housing provided by the Federal Government under the 
provisions of the Lanham Act and leased under contract by the 
National Housing Agency. There are 13 temporary buildings on our 
campus thus leased from the Federal Government under Contract 
HA-V-19099, dated March 11, 19-46. Under the provisions of the 
Contract, we are responsible for the maintenance and operation of 
the buildings and any income in excess of operation costs is pay- 
able to the Federal Government. In 194.7 we paid $13,000 and in 
194-3, ^14., 300 under the provisions of the contract. 



1535 



Bishop, Tena 

sabbatical 
leave 



Leland, Harley A 

and 
Nodine, Earle H. 



Public Housing 
Authority 



Housing 



1536 



TRUSTEE 



Repairs & 
Renewals Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The contract also requires that the buildings must be 
removed two years after the declared termination of the emergency 
by the President unless extension is granted by the Federal Housing 
Agency. 

There are several advantages in transferring this 

property to the University and it is recommende d to the Trustees: 

that we take advantage of this new Federal Legislation and request 

such transfer. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To request the housing and home finance agency 

of the Public Housing Administration to transfer 
to the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts temporary housing, consisting of 
94- dwelling units and 204- dormitory units, 
located on the campus of the University and 
covered under Contract No. HA (V-19099), dated 
March 11, 194-6, and to request also that the 
provisions of Section 313 of the Federal Act 
requiring removal of the buildings be waived, 
and that the Treasurer, Robert D. Hawley, be 
authorized to make such request for the Board 
of Trustees. 

The Trustees said that the Repairs and Renewals Program 

for the current fiscal year includes the following projects: 

Contract Work 

1. Pepairs to Steam iA ains $12,500 

Fernald Hall and Math. Bldg. Old 
Physics Bldg. & Miscellaneous 

2. Draper Hall Roof 7,000 

3. North College Roof 7,000 

4. Construct Basement under Draper Hall Annex 7,000 

5. Replace Filters and Fepair Swimming Pool 7,500 

6. Construction of Farm Corn Cribs 5>000 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to execute con- 
struction contracts in the name of and for 
the Board of Trustees for the necessary con- 
struction on the projects listed. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED; To table request of the Treasurer for payment 
of $100 from Trust Funds in connection with 
accident suffered by l^els T. Gustafson, Plumber. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the work on the steam 
line extension to Gre enough and Chadbourne Dormitories, under con- 
tract with the Cleghorn Company, has now been completed to the 
satisfaction of Mr. E. C. Brown, Engineer, and our own Engineering 
staff. Communications are on file from Edward C. Brown reporting 
upon his inspection of the completed work and recommending its 
acceptance, and from Mr. George C. Brehm, Superintendent of Build- 
ings and Grounds of the University, stating that in his opinion 
and that of Mr. David's, University Engineer, the line has been 
completed in a satisfactory manner. It was 

VOTED : To accept the work as satisfactorily com- 
pleting the requirements of the Contract. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2 ; 4.0 P.M. 



pSp IKaXCm 




Chairman 



Secretary 



1537 



Gustafson, 
Nels T. 



Steam 
Lines 



1538 



TRUSTEE 



Nominating 
Committee 



President' s 
Annual Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

January 19, 194-9, 11:00 A.M., State House, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT; Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Brown, Carmichael, Chandler, 
Desmond, Haigis, Hubbard, Whituiore, 
Mrs. Leach, Mrs. McNamara, President 
Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke 

Governor Dever, President of the Board of Trustees, was 
in his Council Chamber when the meeting convened. He welcomed the 
Board and said that he would look forward to learning :uore about the 
operations of the University. He said that he regretted that he 
would be unable to stay for the meeting as he had to swear in con- 
stitutional officers that day and tend to several other affairs in- 
cluding sessions with representatives of the press. After the 
Governor had left, it was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 
reading of minutes of the last meeting. 

The Chairman dispensed with appointment of a Committee to 
wait upon the Governor inasmuch as the Governor had been present at 
the opening of the meeting to greet nembers of the Board. 

It was 

VOTED ; To request the Chairman to appoint a 
Nominating Committee and Mr. Bartlett 
appointed the following: Philip L. 
Whitmore, Chairman, Frank L. Boyden, 
Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara. 

President Van Meter presented his annual report and said 

that he would welcome the day when it would be possible again to 

print not only his report but those of the other officers of the 

University so that the Trustees and others could be informed of the 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



whole picture. It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To accept the report of the President. 

Mrs. McN&mara said that a meeting of the Trustee 
Committee on Faculty and Program of Study had been called for 
Wednesday, January 12. A'quorum was lacking but those Trustees 
present proceeded with the business before them with the thought 
that the full Board might welcome their views as an aid to ex- 
pediting recommendations of the Administration concerning faculty 
and new courses of study. 

Chairman Bartlett asked Mrs. McNamara if she would 
present the conclusions of the Trustees who met on January 12. 
Upon the recommendation of this group of Trustees, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached new courses of study 
in the J+-yea,v program. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the attached new courses of study 
in the Graduate School. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the attached policy on Outside 
Service for Faculty Members. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the attached policy on Sabbatical 
Leaves. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve appointment of Earl Floyd Cox to 
the position of Research Professor of Agri- 
cultural Engineering effective September 1, 
194.8 and to approve appointment of Carl S. 
Roys as Professor of Electrical Engineering 
effective September 1, 194-3. 



O4J 



New Courses - 
Undergraduate 



New Courses - 
Graduate 



Policy on Out- 
side Service foi 
Faculty Members 



Policy on 

Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Cox, Earl F. 
j(oys, Carl S 



1540 



TRUSTEE 



H. Leland 
Varley 



Adrian H. 
Lindsey 



James 
Robertson. Jr, 



Tena 
Bishop 



Educational 

Policies 

Council 



College of Arts 
and Science 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the following sabbatical leaves: 

H. Leland Varley, Assistant Professor of 
English, for one year at half pay beginning 
September 1, 194-9 to study toward the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree at the 
University of Wisconsin. 

Adrian H. Lindsey, Head of Department of 
Agricultural Economics for six months with 
full pay beginning February 1, 1949 to study 
statistics at the Giannini Foundation for 
Agricultural Economics and to study modern 
developments in Economic Theory and Marketing. 

James Robertson, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Landscape Architecture, for one year at 
half pay beginning September 1, 1949 to study 
toward the Master's degree in Architecture 
at Carnegie Institute of Technology. 

To change sabbatical leave previously granted 
to Miss Tena Bishop, Assistant State 4-H 
Club Leader, from one year with half pay be- 
ginning September 1, 194# to six months with 
full pay beginning September 1, 194-3. 

President Van Meter said that the Educational Policies 

Council of the University, which is made up of deans of several 

schools, elected representatives of the faculty, and certain 

officers of administration, have unanimously 

VOTED : To combine the present separate Schools 

of Arts and Science into a College of Arts 
and Science under one dean. 

He said there would be many advantages in coordinating 

the undergraduate program for the first two years under one head. 

After the first two years in the College of Arts and Science, the 

students will go on to the professional schools or, if they choose, 

remain to specialize in Arts and Science. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize consolidation of the separate 
schools of Arts and Science into a single 
College of Arts and Science under one dean. 



1541 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. McNamara called attention of the Trustees to a 
problem presented by the President on January 12 concerning this 
new College. At that time he said it would be difficult to bring 
in a good experienced man to head the College at the present minimum 
salary of $6,000 for a dean. The President said that school deans 
now receive $300 more than department heads and $600 more than 
professors. He felt that this differential is too small in view of 
the responsibility of the position. The Trustees present on 
January 12 urged that the President recommend a salary increase for 
the Dean of the College of Arts and Science, for the Dean of the 
School of Engineering, and for Administrative Officers at or above 
the Dean level including the President. 

President Van Meter thereupon recommended that the salary 
of the Dean of Arts and Science and the Dean of Engineering be 
fixed at a misiimura of $6,600 and that the salary of the Secretary 
of the University be also fixed at $6,600 as his salary has been 
the same as that of School Deans. This involves the necessity of 
raising the salary of Dean Machmer, the Dean of the University, who 
will be over the School Deans. The President, therefore 
recommended that the minimum salary of the Dean of the University 
be fixed at $7,500 and also that the salary of the Treasurer be 
fixed at minimum of $7,500 as his salary is now the same as that 
of the Dean of the University. The President made no recommenda- 
tion concerning his own salary. 

The Trustees felt that the salary of the President should 
be raised substantially above its present figure and there was 
discussion as to how this might be accomplished. The salary of 



Salaries cf 

Dean of College, 
of Arts and 
Science 

Dean of Engi- 
neering 

Secretary of the 
University 

Dean of th* 
University 

Treasurer of the 
University 



President of 
the University 



154^ 



TRUSTEE 



Salary of the 
President 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Van Meter is nov classified in grade 73 and the State 

recognizes only 74. salary ranges which means that under the 

State's classified system the salary of the President could be 

raised only $300 more. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To fix the salary of the President in the 
budget at salary grade 74 which carries 
'a minimum of $9,900. 

The Trustees expressed the hope that after the salary 
of the President has been fixed at the maximum allowed in the 
classified system, the Trustees may then be in a position to re- 
quest a substantial increase outside of the classified system. 
It was also 

VOTED ; To fix the salaries of the Dean of the 
College of Arts and Science, the Dean 
of the School of Engineering, and the 
Secretary of the University in salary 
grade 63 (minimum $6,600) and to fix 
the salaries of the Dean of the Uni- 
versity and the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity in salary grade 66 (minimum 
salary $7,500). 

President Van ^eter said that later he hopes to combine 
under one administrator all the agricultural services on the 
campus - the Experiment Station, the Extension Service, and the 
instructional program and that he would recommend a salary for 
this administrator at a later meeting of the Board. 

The Trustees then considered several requests for 
sabbatical leaves which had not been ready for the January 12 meet- 
ing. On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the following sabbatical 
leaves; 



TRUSTEE 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Fred C. Ellert, Assistant Professor of German, 
for one year at half pay beginning September 1, 
1949 to study toward the doctor's degree in 
German. 

May E. Foley, Extension Nutritionist, for 
three months' travel in Europe at full pay 
during 194-9 to observe nutrition conditions 
and to attend the International Home Economics 
meeting in Stockholm. Also three months in 
late 1949 or 1950 at full pay to visit Exten- 
sion Services in other sections of the country 
to observe methods employed in conducting pro- 
grams. 

Beatrice E. Billings, State Home Demonstration 
Leader, for three months in 1949 at full pay 
to visit Extension Services in other parts of 
the country. Also three months in 1950 at 
full pay to study and visit Extension Services 
in other areas including attendance at the 
meeting of the Associated Country Women of the 
World in Australia, and the Extension Service 
in Hawaii. 

On the recommendation of President Van i¥1 eter, it was 



154? 



sJ 



Fred C. Ellert 



May E. Foley 



Beatrice E. 
Billings 



VOTED: To elect Alexander A. Mackimmie, who retired 
as Dean of the School' of Liberal Arts on 
September 30, 194-3 as Dean of the School of 
Liberal Arts Emeritus. 

And it was 

VOTED: To elect Margaret P. Hamlin, who retired as 

Placement Officer for Women on August 31, 194-3 
as Placement Officer Emeritus. 

President Van Meter said that the Faculty Committee on 
Honorary Degrees has made several recommendations and that he 
would like to bring these before the Board for discussion and action. 
Chairman Bartlett asked if there were others still to be con- 
sidered by the Committee, and President Van Meter said that more 
names probably would be forthcoming before Commencement. After 
discussion, it was 



Alexander A. 
Mackimmie, Dean 
of the School of 
Liberal Arts 
Emeritus 



Margaret P. 
Hamlin, Placement 
Officer Emeritus 



Honorary 
Degrees 



1544 



TRUSTEE 



Valtham Field 
Station Building 



Engineering 
Building - 
wing 



Cement Block 
Dormitories 



i 



Engineering 
Annex 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED; To postpone consideration of candidates 
for honorary degrees and for the meri- 
torious service award of the Alumni 
until some time in April. 

It was agreed* to call a special meeting of the Board in 
early April for passing upon these candidates. 

Trustee Whitmore said that on January 12, the Trustee 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds met at the University but lacked 

a quorum and therefore present their several recommendations to the 

Board as individual Trustees. On the recommendation of the members 

of the Buildings and Grounds Committee who met January 12 and after 

discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To approve plans and specifications of 
David. D. Barnes, Architect for the new 
building at the Waltham Field Station - 
these plans to be subject to such minor 
changes as may finally be recommended by 
the University officers concerned. 

It was 

VOTED; To approve plans and specifications of 
W. Cornell Appleton, Architect for the 
Electrical Engineering wing of the main 
Engineering Building. 

It was 

VOTED ; To accept, subject to completion of all 
work required under the specifications, 
the fourth and fifth buildings of the 
cement block dormitory group and to accept 
as of December 1, 194$ the first three 
buildings of the cement block dormitory 
group constructed under plans prepared by 
Alderman and Alderman, Architects. 

It was 

VOTED; To accept, subject to completion of a few 
minor construction details, the Engineer- 
ing Annex Building built from plans of 
Louis ¥. Ross, Architect. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED: To accept, subject to final completion, 
Mills Dormitory constructed under plans 
prepared by Louis W. Ross, Architect. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve plans of Architect Boss for 

construction of Faculty Apartment Build- 
ing under terms of lease with University 
Building Association. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve plans for the construction of 
a new Power Plant. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve and ratify actions of all 

committees of the Board since the date 
of the last annual meeting. 

There was discussion of the proposed revision of the 

budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1949* Treasurer 

Hawley explained that it has been necessary to increase the budget 

previously approved by the Board so as to admit 250 more freshman 

students than originally planned. President Van Meter said that by 

taking 250 more students this year, the University will lessen the 

adjustments made necessary by the graduation of a very large class 

in 1950 "when succeeding classes are smaller. Treasurer Hawley also 

explained that fuel costs have gone up since the original budget 

was approved and other expenses have increased. All members of the 

Board have received copies of the budget revision proposals in 

advance of the meeting. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve enlargement of the original budget 
by the amount of $170,290 for maintenance plus 
an item sufficient to cover the salary increases 
voted earlier in the meeting. 



45 



Mills 
Dormitory 



Faculty 

Apartment 

Building 



Power Plant 



Budget 






1546 



TRUSTEE 



Treasurer' s 
Annual Report 



Room 

Rentals - 
reduction of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Hawley explained that the Power Plant and 

utility service lines cannot be built for the amount originally 

appropriated and that it Tiay be necessary to go to the Legislature 

for additional funds if this project is to be completed. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to re- 
quest $191,000 for completion of the 
Power Plant project. 

Treasurer Hawley said that copies of his annual report 

have been sent to all members of the Board and that he would 

therefore present a brief picture of the business operations of 

the University. After his presentation, it was 

VOTED ; To accept the report of the Treasurer and 
to request that the report on business 
operations be put in writing and distributed 
to all members of the Board. 

Treasurer Hawley read a petition from members of the 

student Senate requesting reduction in room rentals for those 

students who are living in rooms designed for fewer persons. They 

feel that the University has not made sufficient reduction in 

rentals where three or four students have been placed in a room 

built for two or where two or raore students have been placed in a 

room built for one. The Treasurer and President said that they 

have looked into the matter and feel that the students have just 

cause for requesting some reduction. After discussion, it was 

VOTE D: To authorize the Treasurer to institute 
a scale of reduced rents for students 
living under crowded conditions with 
understanding that maximum reduction 
shall not exceed $10.00 per student per 
semester from present rates. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Nominating Committee presented its recommendations 

concerning officers for the coming year and membership on 

committees of the Board. After the Trustees heard the report, 

it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Secretary to cast one 
ballot for the officers and committee 
members as recommended by the Nominating 
Committee and as listed below: 

President Paul A. Dever 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bartlett 
Secretary, James ¥. Burke 
Treasurer, Robert D. Hawley 

Committ ee on Faculty and Program of St udy 

Leonard Carmichael, Chairman Clifford C. Hubbard 

Frank L. Boyden Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 

John J. Desmond 



C ommittee on Ex tension .Service. 

Mrs. Joseph S. Leach, Chairman 
Frank L. Boyden 
Harry D. Brown 

Committee on Expe riment Station 
Alden C. Brett, Chairman 
John Chandler 
John M. Deely 



John Chandler 
Richard Sal tons tall 



Ernest Hoftyzer 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 



Committee on Agriculture and Horticultu re 

John Chandler, Chairman Ernest Hoftyzer 

Harry D. Brown Richard Saltonstall 

John Haigis 



Committ ee on Buildings an d Grounds 
Philip F. Khitaiore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John M. Deely 

Committee on Financ e 

John T w. Haigis, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Richard Saltonstall 

Comm ittee on L egislation 

Ralph F. Taber, Chairman 
John V. Haigis 
John M. Deely 



Clifford C. Hubbard 
Raloh F. Taber 



Ralph F. Taber 
Philip F. "Whitraore 



Clifford C. Hubbard 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 



547 



Nominating 
Committee 



Committees 



1548 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Executiv e Committee 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Leonard Carmichael 



Mrs- Joseph S. Leach 
Philip F. Imhitraore 



The meeting was adjourned at 1:45 P.M. 



A ^J,. vS-Jk JEfe£V^,Chairman 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



April 1, 1949 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 



The following letter dated March 23, 1949 from 
Treasurer Hawley to the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts and the resultant mail ballot are hereby made a 
part of the official records of the Board. 



March 28, 1949 



To: The Board of Trustees 



Subject: Authorization for Construction Contract 

The contract for the Construction of the Animal Disease 
Control Laboratory as authorized by the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee of the Board of Trustees has been awarded to D. A. 
Sullivan & Sons, Inc., of Northampton. 

The contract was referred, as usual, to the Attorney 
General of the Commonwealth for approval as to form and he has 
raised a question as to proper Trustee authorization for its 
execution. 

The original action by the Board of Trustees was taken 
on September 10, 1947, as follows: 

VOTE D: To refer to the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds with power the acceptance 
of bids and execution of contracts for the 
construction of Animal Disease Building, 
Physics Building, Engineering Building, 
Cindei -Block Dormitories, fcaltham Field 
Station Building. 

Subsequently, on October 7, 1947, the Trustee Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds 

VOTED : To approve the plans for the Animal Pathology 
Building as presented by Architect Ross and to 
authorize the Treasurer to execute a contract 
for the construction of this building in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees. 

Accordingly, the Trustees are on record as approving 
tie execution of this contract and yet the Attorney General's 
Office feels that the final action of authorization should come 



15- 



Animal 

Pathology 

Building 



1550 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



direct from the Full Board rather than through one of its 
committees. Therefore, I am requesting by mail poll a vote of 
the Board of Trustees authorizing this contract. You may be 
assured that the matter has had careful consideration and 
approval of the Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 
Funds are available and the contract has been approved by the 
Massachusetts Public Building Commission. The contractor is 
ready to start work and we wish to clear up these formal 
matters as soon as possible. 

A ballot and stamped envelope for return are enclosed, 
Your consideration is appreciated. 



Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



Mail B allot 

In accordance with the information in the Treasurer's 
letter of March 28, 194-9 > it is recommended: 

That the Treasurer be authorized to execute contract 
with D. A. Sullivan and Sons, Inc., in the amount of $4-52,959 
for the Construction of the Animal Disease Control Laboratory 
in the name of and for the Board of Trustees. 



Approved: 



E. A. Van Meter 
Lottie A. Leach 
Philip F. "Whitinore 
John Chandler 
William A. Orton 
Leonard Carmichael 
Harry Dunlap Brown 



William M. Cash in 
Clifford C. Hubbard 
Ralph F. Taber 
John M. Deely 
Elisabeth L. McNamara 
Alden C. Brett 
Ernest Hoftyzer 




s 



^-^Si^U 



_Secretary 



JL _ ._- ^J _ „ . . . 



Chairman 



Sigdeigrachiajte^Cajurses, 



Credit 



•a 

$ -> 6 



Credit, 3. 



I) 



Psychology 75 (I) • STATISTICS IB PSYCHOLOGY - The application oi 
Psychology o ^ prooe dure S to the analysis of psychological 

data ana to problems of- measurement in Psychology and re- 

la ted fields. . 

2 class hours; 1 2~hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, Psychology 26 and Hathematics,„ 

'vith the proviso that the following be stipulated as 

prereuui sites % _ 

Mathematics 62 or Agricultural Education 79 . 

pcy.holOKY 63 (I) . PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY - A study of the rela- 
P.ychology^U; ^^ t ^ im± ^ v& behav ior and his 

ohvsiological processes. Emphasis will be placeu on 
sensory^ and motor phenomena, drives, emotional behavior, 

and learning. 

3 class hours. . 

Prerequisite, Psychology 26 and Physiology 32. 

French 3 (I), A (II). Interfile idate French - Primarily a reading 
course vith stress on both exact translation and rapid 
reading for comprehension. Gramjiar review ana oral 
practice. Fecommended as a terminal course for those who 
are primarily interested in the ability to read French. 
Open to graduate students without credit. 

Prerecuisitesi French 1 and 2, or 2 years of high school 
rrereL.ui6xw.p l Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

French . ' 

TTrpnch 75 (I). (II). Cours de Style - A study of syntax and idioms 

*""* 75 it^n aoLced level. ^^"*>g^ * ^^ Credit, 3 bours. 
himself clearly and logically m living French. *■ « > ' 

M , Credit, 3 hours. 

French 81 {*}* The Modern Hovel. 

French 82 (n) . Advanced Grammar and Com pos ^^VtonMcB- ^ 

Becommended for majors who intend to teach French. 

French 91 (I), 92 (II). Seminar - The content of this course will 

French 91 Uj, £• U / on +u0 seniors and graduate 

vary trom year -go y«* Credit, 3 hours each semester, 
udents • 

T4. ->..«~ *n m *:> (ll\ An introductory course for those who have 
Italian 51 I), 5 MH)^ to intr ^ ^ preparation ls insufficient 

for none advanced work. Training in grammar, composition, 
pronunciation, with special emphasis £ "^^ each semester „ 
4. class hours. oreaiT,, ;> uuu 

Italian 75 (I), 76 (II). Primarily a reading course with considerable 

attention to review of grsaaar. ^ Eemester- 

4. class hours. wo ^ ' 



ice, vocabulary study, 
speech. 
Prerequisites, Spanish 7 and 3 or equivalent. 

^lass hours. Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Public Health 66 (I), (II). Principles of Sanitation - The applica- 
tion of sanitary engineering and related sanitary sciences 
to health problems in the environment in urban and rural 
communities. 
2 class hours. Credit, 2« 

ecuisite, Civil Engineering 77 or permission of the 
in3truc 

Bacteriology 54- (I)? (II).. Vater and Sewage Bacteriology - Elementary 
ba .ology vith emphasis placed upon the importance of 

ria found in water a: ywage. VJork vill include 
routine analyses used in the in of water- and sewage 
the laboratory control of vater and sewage treatment 
plants. 

2 3-hour la I ?riods. Credit, 3» 

Prerequisite, Civil Engineering 77 or permission of the 
ins true to. 

Zoology 35 (I) $ (II) • Vertebrate Physiology - An introductory course 
which will include consideration of circulation, respiration, 
digestion*, metabolism, excretion, chemical and nervous 
coordination, muscular activity, and reproduction. The 
laboratory work will acquaint the student with some of the 
equipment and methods used in physiological studies, with 
emphasis on the experimental approach to the laboratory 
exercises. 
2 class hours; Credit, 3* 

1 3-hour laboratory period. 

Zoology 33 (I) . Comparative Physiology ~ A course designed to 

familiarize students vith physiological principles and 
adaptations to the environment of animals throughout the 
invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. In the laboratory the 
experimental method will be developed involving general 
procedures and individual problems. 

2 class hours; 2 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 4-. 
Prerequisites, Zoology 1, Zoology 35 « 

Zoology 84. (II) . General Cellular Physiology - Lectures and 

laboratory covering properties and processes common to 
all organisms, including protoplasmic organization, perme- 
ability, metabolism, movement, bioelectri.city, and repro- 
duction. 

2 class hours j 2 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 4-t 

Prerequisites, one year biology; organic chemistry. 

Zoology 37 (I). Endocrinology - Qnphasis will be directed toward the 
importance of the endocrines in their control over normal 

functions (grovth, metabolism, reproduction, etc.) in a 
variety of animals. Laboratory work will consist of demon- 
strations and individual problems. 
2 class hours; 1 3-hour laboratory periodo Credit, 3<> 






























I 



II 



2 

- 
3 class 

51 . 

Industrial Engineering II). 

gree 

eeonaay and effec ^?^ 

1 class laboratory 

Prerequisite, K.I. 2, _.- 

Inc Ul Engineering SO (II) . K 

;rinc. ■« expenses foi 

- **suits ^y* 1 

tates ;he causes o* ex- 

applied .ting organised 

in the industri lant. 
3 class . rs. 
Prere Ite, I.E. 51 • 

Industrie 2 neering 32 (II). " " A 

X %7e principles in simplificatioi ,eans of 

.i and i applies 

: les . 
1 "l°ss hourj 1 3-hour lab: 
Pr er-: I.E. 76 concurrent 

Indust: Professional 

only. Prese 
in the fie 

-.sis on recer -s. 

Food Technology 35 (I) *6 (II). Technology o: ^te - A 

survey of marine products -erce ana industry, 
Canning, curing and freezing of seafoods . Chemical and 
laicrobiolcgical aspects .^ s ' . o 

industrial problems and scientific literature, aphasia 

is placed on the Ke - ~i.es. 

1 clas; -t 1-2 hour 1 












t, 3. 









Credit, 






9A - Advanced Ion of Mathematics 

91. Line an :als, expansion). 

ier's les, calculi/ mtia a :.ta 



3 class hours Credit, 3 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 91 •• 



GRADUATE courses 

Courses for Major or Minor Credit s. 

Bacteriology - 

193 • Medical Technology. — Lectures on the medical significance and in- 
terpretation of clinical laboratory procedures. Subjects included 
are's bacteriology, histology, parasitology and serology. 

Credit, 6. 

194. Medical Technology. — Continuation of course 193. Subjects in- 
cluded ares clinical chemistry, hematology, basal metabolism, 
laboratory records and laboratory administration. Weekly 
seminars are included. Credit, 6. 

195- Medical Technology. — Laboratory application of clinical proce- 
dures .in a hospital certified by the American Medical Associa- 
tion for the instruction of Medical Technologists. Subjects in- 
cluded are; bacteriology,, histology, parasitology and. serology. 

Credit, A. 

196. Medical Technology. — Continuation of course 195* Subjects in- 
cluded ares clinical chemistry, hematology and basal metabolism. 

Credit, A. 

Botany - 

113. Forest Pathology. -r- A lecture course dealing with the more common 
and important fungus diseases and physiological troubles, and 
•with wood decay caused by saprophytic fungi which effect forest 
trees and forest practice. Credit, 2. 

11A. Insect Transmission of plant Diseases. — A course of study in the 
fundamental role played by insects in the inception, dissemina- 
tion, and epiphytotic development of plant disease. Credit, 2. 

• 180. Problems in Botany. — Individual assignments in morphology, 

taxonomy , physiology or pathology. Credit, 2-4. each semester. 

Cheiaistry- 

130. 132. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — Lectures. These courses will 

. Include each year special topics such as stereo cheois try, resonance, 
free radical reactions, reaction mechanisms, molecular rearrange- 
ments, etc. Emphasis will be given to recent developments and con- 
tribution's. Given in alternate years . Credit, 3. 

139. Chemistry of Natural Products.; — The lectures and collateral read- 
ings will deal with the chemistry of some classes of natural com- 
pounds which are of biochemical and economic interest. Proteins, 
the sugars, starch, cellulose, polyuronides, lignin, gluco sides, 
alkaloids, enzymes, purines, pyrimidines, and pigments will be 
considered. 

Credit, 2. 



-2- 

Education-. 

161, Methods in Adult Education. — Group and individual in- ' 
struction with adults and methods of developing ieadej. 

to c in the work in the field. Credit , 2-3. 

162. Apprenticeship in ixdult Education, — By arrangement with the 
instructor the student will spend several :s in the field 
under the supervision of an extension agent or other adult 
education worker. Credit, 3. 

166, preparation and Use of Audio-Visual Aids,; — Study is made of 
available media of audio-visual aids to ins traction, con- 
struction of visual Material, and accepted methods of use. Credit, 2-3. 

167, Organisation of a School Auaio-tfisual Program,— Attention is 
given to methods of surveying school needs, to purchase of 
equipment, to establishment and use of audio- visual libraries, 
to scheduling of equipment and materials and to supervision 

of methods of usina. the materials by the teachers. Credit, 2-3, 

Entomology - 

160. Natural History Methods,— a. survey of modern practices in the 
field. This will involve a study of visual education, trail- 
side museums, nature trails, and exhibitions of natural I 
products. The making of lantern slides, charts, displays, 
and the working out of specific problems will be arranged 
according to individual needs. Credit, 3» 

Floriculture - 

199 • Seminar, — A review of scientific literature relating to 

floricultUral practices, including various phases of green- 
house manageiaent, soils, fertilizers, ; plant 'propagation, 
growth 'regulators, insect pest 'aitfd disease control, and 
other pertinent subjects . Credit., 1-2 each semester. 

Food Techn olog y - 

WWWWWW wum ■«■■—■■ m i i- if hu m wWVll"m 

185, 136* Fisheries Technology.— Marine products of commerce. 

Processed seafoods. Canning, curing, freezing, and refrigera- 
tion. Spoilage* problems, By-products. Chemical and 
microbiological aspects. Scientific literature. Industrial 
problems. Credit, 2-3. 

Mathematics - 

£05, 106, Introduction to Modern Algebra, — Fundamental concepts 
• of modern algebra. Postulate systems in general and, in 
particular, such structures as groups «, rings, fields, and 
vector Spaces. Credit, 3« 

110. Differential Geometry,— The application of calculus to the j 

study of curves and surfaces in three dimensional space. Credit, 3. 






1 ' -3- • 

Mathematics (continued) 

115 p 116, Functions of a Complex Variable, — An introduction to 
the theory of functions of a complex variable* The course 
will discuss such topics as derivatives, the Cauehy-Riemann 
equations, conformal mapping, the elementary functions, the 
Cauchy integral theorem and formula, singularities, power 
* series, and Rieman surfaces. Credit, 3. 

* 

125 • Theory of Functions of a Real Variable,' — The real number 

system, limits, point sets, continuous functions, derivatives 

of one and more real variables. Credit, 3» 

130 » Theory of Number's. — The positive integers, primes, totients, 

congruences, Diophantine analysis. Credit, 3» 

151 o Modern Synthetic Geometry,— -An extension of the geometry of 
the' triangle and the circle. The course is intended 
especially for high school teachers. Credit, 3» 

165 « Theory of Equations'. — An introduction to advanced algebra, 
A discussion of the conditions for and methods of solving 
algebraic and traxiscendentai 'equations! ruler and compass 
construction! systems of equations | determinants and matrices! 
symmetric functions! resultants! discriminants! invariants! 
the fundamental theorem of algebra. Credit, 3» 

166, Introduction to Higher Geometry. — a study of various methods 
employed in the modern treatment of geometry of points, lines, 
and conies. Such topics as homogeneous point and line 
coordinates ! infinite elements! harmonic division) groups of 
transformations ^nd their invariants! and the elements of 
projective and other geometries will be considered* Credit, 3« 

171. Vector Analysis. — The algebra and calculus of vectors. Appli- 
cations to physics and other fields will be considered. Credit, 3« 

194. Advanced Calculus, — Line and surface integrals, Taylor's ex- 
pansion, Fourier 1 s series, calculus of variations, Gamma and 
Beta Functions. Credit, 3. 

£00. Thesis. Credit, 10, 

Zoology and Physiolo&y- 

102. problems in Invertebrate Zoology. — Invertebrate fauna of local 
ponds, streams and bogs. Morphology, habits, life cycles and 
classification of fresh-water protozoans, sponges, flatworms, 
bryozocins and crustaceans, with a survey of the important 
literature on each group. Several field trips. Credit, 3. 

103. Animal Parasitology. — Important protozoan and helminthic 

parasites of man and domestic animals. Emphasis is placed upon 
morphology, physiological activities, classification and 



Zoology fand physiolog y- (continued) 

103 o phylogeny of the parasites life cycles, vectors, and modes of 

transmission; host-parasite relationships, uid other fundamental 
principles of parasitism as a way of life. Credit, 3« 

104« Problems in Parasitism. — External and internal parasites of re- 
presentative animals 5 prepare tion of parasites and parasitized 
organs for study 3 classification, structure and life cycles of 
parasites «nd effect upon their hosts. Seminar reports on re- 
cent important phases of parastioiogy. Credit, 3, 

107, Fishery Biology, — Theory in the practice of regulating ■ fresh- 
water fisheries} the physical ana biologicU. conditions of the 
enviroment and their influence on fish populations. Credit, 3« 

125, General Cytology. —A consideration of the morphological 
features of ceils in relation to their function. Lectures, 
seminar reports and laboratory work will deal with cytoplasmic 
structure and inclusions and nuclear phenomena. Credit, 3% 

126, Special Cytology, — A consideration jf special problems in 
cytology such as growth, differentiation, aging, cytogenetics, 
and the application of physical and chemical methods to the 

study of cytcphysioiogy. Credit, 3» 

142, Comparative physiology.— A course designed to familiarise stu- 
dents with physiological principles and adaptations to the en- 
viroment of animals throughout the invertebrate and vertebrate 
phyla. In 'the .Laboratory the. experimental method will be de- 
veloped involving general procedures ua& individual problems. Credit, U* 

M2« General Cellular Physiology.— Lectures and laboratory covering 
properties and processes common to ail organisms, including 
protoplasmic organization, permeability, metabolish, movement, 
bioelectricity, and reproduction. Credit, 4. 

143 • Endocrinology,— Emphasifc will be directed toward the importance 
of the endocrines in their conti'ol over normal functions 
(growth, metabolism, reproduction, etc.) in a variety of 
animals. Laboratory work will consist of demonstrations and 
individual problems. Credit 3 t 

145- Advanced Vertebrate Physiology. — An opportunity for the student 

to gain experience in small animal surgery and in ms king standard 
experimental preparations. Suitable techniques for recording re- 
sults will be employed, una the proper interpretation of the 
acquireddatawill.be stressed. Credit, 3* 

155. Seminar. Credit, 1. 



ife 

with 
200. Thesis 



I 












, 






tli • > accept < .... 

* 

Lty, into conflict vith ti 
.. Commonwealth of s. 

" tution> hence it is under 

ob. of the state, without char; 

so : this 

The Urrivej.- ponsibil rivate professional ser 

does work in a 
hose who employ ;hat h 

6. . . If in direct competition 

air as an exf 

* 






all inf ':. of his 
;nt of the n&i id extent 1 activities* the case of, a 

] ;1 or the Head of a Division she. 
vereity- facilities or equipment are required for private 
on c ; >f the Dep&rtmert or Dean of 

An 5e shall be paid to t 

fee shall "N determined by 

--' ' ! 

C the Department : : . 

appl; 
i . ,eaching faculty 9 the 

ers oi \ Servic 



Deeembe 



- 

- - 

■ 

i 
■ 

lently thai: 



t -i -» ■ - 
3, baff member will 

half .. 

/ Ho 1« th pay shall nted for salaried employment however & 

the ex, ience. This not pre iptance of rships, f 

ships, or -other financial aid . -'ual is i in study, 

5 Any me e staff wishing 1 af of sabbatical lea 

file his statement of intention with 1 I of his department at least 

six n, B before the leave is to t If approved by him he 

Dear, o hool, it is then prese fc e President for his appro, 

and ac : by the Boas Trustees. ber of the Extension or b 

Station "staff should file his .request the head of his d^artne: p 

if he approves, will oresent it throu, Irector of his Divxs: 

Presidents will thin place it be; mstees with his recc 

Membc the Administrative Group make r applications direct to 






President 



6, In o at the lea- 7 be of : :he Univ^ as w.l as 

lie lal'eper* ™^ 

least one full y ervice immeax&oely a* ^ 

e. Failure tc obligav recipient to re- 

ce mcney* In of extenuating circum- 

st 3, this repayment nay be modi or cancelled by the Board of 

Trustees . 



December" 21, 1948 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
April 7/J149, 2:00 P.M., Mr. Bartlett' s Office, Boston 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Bartlett presiding 

Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Carmichael, Chandler, Deely, Desmond, 
Hoftyzer, Leach, McNamara, Orton, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 



It vas 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

President Van Meter introduced the names of ten nominees 
for honorary degrees. All ten persons have been recommended by th« 
University Committee on Honorary Degrees which is headed by Dean 
Machmer. There was discussion as to the total number of degrees 
which the University might appropriately give at one Commencement. 
It was felt that even though the student body has grown and the 
number of degrees in course has risen, the value of honorary de- 
grees should be protected by keeping the number granted low 
rather than high. 

After discussion of each nominee, it was 
VOTED. : To award the following honorary degrees: 

Maurice J. Tobin, the degree of Doctor of Laws, to be 
awarded at the final convocation at Devens. 

All other degrees to be awarded at the June Commencement 
in Amherst: 

Bernard H. Smith, the degree, Doctor of Humane Letters. 

Stanley B. Freeborn, the degree, Doctor of Science. 

Harlan N. Vorthley, the degree, Doctor of Science. 

Sidney Waugh, the degree, Doctor of Fine Arts. 

John V. Gregg, the degree, Doctor of Landscape Architecture. 

Daniel G. Lacy, the degree, Master of Horticulture. 



1551 



Honorary 
degrees 



1552 



TRUSTEE 



Bachelor of 
Science in 
Chemical En- 
gineering 



Mildred Briggs - 
sabbatical 
leave 



John G. Arc hi bale 
sabbatical 
leave 



Assistant 
Treasurer - 

L. Lawrence Tayldr 



Stephen B. 
Hitchner 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Van Meter recommended that the Trustees 

authorize the University to grant the degree of Bachelor of Science 

in Chemical Engineering. Courses leading to this degree were 

approved by the Executive Committee under date of April 14., 194-3 and 

several candidates are almost cualified for the degree. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the University to grant the 
degree, Bachelor of Science in Chemical 
Engineering beginning in June of 1949. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To grant sabbatical leave subject to the 
usual conditions to Miss Mildred Briggs, 
Assistant Professor of Home Economics for 
one semester at full pay beginning 
September 1949, to study Applied Art in 
Home Furnishing. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To grant sabbatical leave subject to the 
usual conditions to John G. Arc hi bald, 
Research Professor of Animal Husbandry, for 
six months at full pay beginning September 15, 
1949, for study at Michigan State College. 

Upon the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 



VOTED : To appoint L. Lawrence Taylor as Assistant 
Treasurer of the University effective upon 
the retirement of John K. Broadfoot, or 
approximately July 1, 194-9 at minimum salary 
rate for this grade. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 



VOTED : To appoint Dr. Stephen B. Hitchner as Research 
Professor of Veterinary Science at the minimum 
salary rate for this grade, effective 
Ju}y 1, 1949. 

President Van Meter called attention of the Board to a 

communication which he has from Mr. John Brooks Pratt offering to 

give land located in the town of Princeton, Massachusetts, to the 


















■*v ^ . 



— fc. 



9. 












-i Ls. 

1s te t 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University to be used as a research station. Various members of 
the Board expressed the opinion that it would be against the in- 
terests of the University to establish this additional separate 
research station, and it was 

VOTED : To decline with thanks Mr. Pratt's offer. 

Treasurer Hawley presented brief report on progress of the 
building program. (See attached list.) 

Chairman Bartlett raised question as to the assignment of 
the new Trustees, Mr. Cashin and Dr. Orton, to Committees of the 
Board. Each Trustee is to serve on the Committees on which his 
predecessor served until the next Annual Meeting. Meantime, how- 
ever, it was 

VOTED : To elect Mr. Cashin to serve on the Trustee 
Committee on Legislation. 

The Trustees discussed the Boarding Hall of the University, 
Treasurer Hawley spoke of the fact that the Boarding Hall is 
losing money thi3 year and that because of comments in the student 
newspaper a Committee from the Office of the Commission on Ad- 
ministration & Finance have looked into the Boarding Hall 
operations. President Van Meter said much of the difficulty 
stems from the fact that freshmen have not been required this year 
to eat at the University Boarding Hall. There are inadequate 
facilities to feed all the students this year and the President 
did not feel that he could require certain groups to eat there 
which would have definitely barred other groups. Because of this 
free choice on the part of the students, there is a great deal 
of fluctuation in the numbers served at the Boarding Hall and it 



JL zJzJzJ 



Assignment of 
new Trustees 



Dining Hall 



1554 



TRUSTEE 



Harley A. Leland 
Assoc. Prof. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



has been difficult for the Manager to plan meals. The President 

said that the University should definitely have an additional 

Dining Hall before this problem will be solved. It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Executive Committee to 
meet with the Administration at a later 
date and approve* a supplementary budget 
for the University. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED ; To promote Harley A. Leland from Associate 

Professor to Professor effective July 1, 194-9. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3*50 P.M. 




Chairman 



Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



May 12, 1949 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 



The following letter dated May 5, 1949 from Treasurer 
Havley to the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachu- 
setts and the resultant mail ballot are hereby made part of the 



official records of the Board. 



May 5, 1949 



To: Board of Trustees 



Subject: Waltham Field Station Laboratory and 
Electrical Engineering Buildings 

Gentlemen: 

The Board of Trustees at its Annual Meeting on 
January 19, 1949 j upon the recommendation of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds voted to approve plans and specifications 
for the New Building at the Waltham Field Station and, also, the 
plans and specifications for the Electrical Engineering Wing of 
the Main Engineering Building. 

We have taken bids on the Waltham Field Station Build- 
ing and have the approval of the Public Building Commission for 
the award of a contract to the Poorvu Construction Company for 
this work. 

We are now advertising for bids for the Engineering 
Building and expect to be in a position soon to execute a con- 
tract for that work. 

I am sure the Trustees, by the action of their 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds and the full board action 
on January 19, have intended to authorize the execution of con- 
tract and necessary procedures for accomplishing this work. 
The Attorney General requires specific action by the Board 
covering execution of contract and I am, therefore, requesting 
your vote by mail poll. A ballot form and a return stamped 
envelope are enclosed. lour early consideration will be 
greatly appreciated. 



Very truly yours, 

/s/ Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



1555 



Waltham Field 

Station 

Laboratory 



Electrical 
Engine erinff 
Buildings 



1556 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mail Ballot 
In accordance with the explanation of the Treasurer 
in his letter of May 5> 194-9, I hereby indicate my decision on 
the following matters: 



1. 



That the Treasurer be authorized to 
execute contract in the name of and 
for the Board of Trustees with the 
Poorvu Construction Company covering 
the construction of Laboratory and 
Auditorium Building at the Waltham 
Field Station. 

Approved. 

Not Approved. 



2. 



That the Treasurer be authorized to 
execute contract in the name of and 
for the Board of Trustees for the 
construction of the Electrical Engi- 
neering Wing of the Main Engineering 
Building provided acceptable bid with- 
in the appropriation is received. 



.Approved^ 



X 



Not Approved. 



Leonard Carmichael 
R. A. Van Meter- 
Joseph V. Bartlett 
A. C. Brett 
John J. Desmond, Jr. 
Ernest Hoftyzer 
Elizabeth L. McNamara 
Philip F. whitmore 



Harry Dunlap Brown 
William M. Cashin 
John Chandler 
John M. Deely 
John W. Haigis 
Clifford C. Hubbard 
Ralph F. Taber 




_Secretary 



6/ 



/Jj/Xjc ^J^ A^9 q^SZ^ Chairman 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1557 



STEE 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TEUSTEES 

June 4, 1949, 11:00 A.M., Butterfield Dormitory, Amherst 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brovn, 

Carmichael, Cashin, Chandler, Deely, 
Desmond, Orton, Taber, Whitmore, 
Mrs. Leach, Mrs. McNamara, President 
Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 

VOTED: To waive reading of the call and reading of 
the minutes of the last previous meeting. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve minutes of all meetings up to date. 

Upon the recommendation of the President and of the 



faculty of the University, it was 

VOTED : To award the degree Bachelor of Science to those 
candidates listed on the Commencement program; 
to award the degree Bachelor of Arts to those 
candidates listed on the Commencement program; 
to award the degree Bachelor of Business Admin- 
istration to those candidates listed on the 
Commencement program; to award the degree 
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 
to those candidates listed on the Commencement 
program; to award the degree Bachelor of Science 
in Civil Engineering to those candidates listed 
on the Commencement program; to award the degree 
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
to those candidates listed on the Commencement 
program; to award the degree Bachelor of Science 
in Mechanical Engineering to those candidates 
listed on the Commencement program; to award the 
degree Bachelor of Vocational Agriculture to 
those candidates listed on the Commencement pro- 
gram; and to award the degree Bachelor of 
Landscape Architecture to those candidates listed 
on the Commencement program. 



Degrees 



1558 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Surama Cum Laude 



Joseph Rogers Leal 
Janice Rittenburg 



Louis Robinson 
Eugene H. Varney 



Magna Cum Laude 



David Bonneville Balise 
Joel Ralph Cohen 
Anson Richard Cooke 
Pearl Gladys Hirshon 
Harris Frederick Holstein 
Alvin Joseph Keroack 
Judith Trowbridge Lambert 



John Everett Lane 
William James Mellen 
Norton Hart Nickerson 
Rose Marie Pepi 
Frank Earl Shumway 

-*Clifton Mason Waugh 

--Ralph Willard Whit comb, Jr, 



Cum Laude 



Simpson Beral Adler 
Murray I. Altsher 
Martha Beck 
Arthur Brown 
Bernard Philip Buss el 
Arnold Levi Erickson 
Joanne Frawley 
Irving Gibbs 
Emerson W. Hibbard 

Duncan Henry 



Joan Marion Jackler 

Joseph John Licciardello 
■^William Henry Lynch 

Marie Matthes 
^Mitchell Ely Penn 

William Edwin Randall, Jr. 

Bar bars. Preston Rowe 

Marc Sagan 
^Mitchell Reginald Samborski 
Urquhart 



Rite 



Allan M. Abrahams 

Burton Sumner Adler 

John Leo Aldrioh 

Alvin Fred Alkon 

Martha Jean Allison 

Marjorie Elaine Arons 

Charles Winthrope Bailey 

Henry Warren Ballou, Jr. 

Elmer Ellsworth Barrows, Jr. 

Donald Sidney Barrus, Jr. 

Marilyn Moser Bar stow 

Edward Robert Baush 

Robert Mitchell Beal 

Barbara Annie Bean 

Wilfred Jean Beauregard 

Ernest W. Bemis 

Richard Joseph Bibbins 

Arnold Eugene Binder 

Theodore Blank 

Alan Channing Blue stein 

-*Warren Maxwell Bock 
James Norton Bodurtha 



Sally Lyman Bolles 
Harold Milton Bradbury, Jr. 
Shirley Evelyn Braman 
Helen Frances Bride 
Barbara Ann Broderick 
Arthur Elliott Budd 
Cornelius Bulman 
Wayne A. Burnett 
Walter Morse Bussolari, Jr, 
Aldea Bernhardtine Carroll 
Jerome Casper 
James Edward Cassidy 
William Irving Cerier 
Alfred B. Chaet 
Frederick N. B. Chase 
Robert Kenneth Chatel 
Barbara Ruth Child 
Walter Chizinsky 
Robert Clayton Church 
Shirley Ida Clark 
Melvin Benjamin Clayton 
Jean Justine Cleary 



1559 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



-"-Robert Henry Clorite 

*Paul Cole 
Herbert Joseph Cooper 
Hurray Cooper 
Henry Anthony Costantino 
Edward William Critchett 
Richard Paul Crowley 
Ronald Joseph Czaja 

-^Sherwood Goodwin Davidson 
James Wilson Dayton, <Jr. 
Robert Vincent Decareau 
Lois 4yrtle Decker 
William Austin Delaney, Jr. 
Stephen Frederick Dirks 
John Eliot Downey 
Edwin Edward Drewniak 

^ert Delaney D'Unger 
Leo Joseph Dymerski 
Leo Frank Egel 
Dorae Louise Elwell 

-*Fred Herbert Emmert 
Charles Judd Farley, Jr. 
"William Donald Flaherty 
Ralph Thomas Florio 
Charles Edward Flynn 
John Edward Flynn 
John Joseph Foley, Jr. 
Nancy Camille Ford 
Phyllis Marjorie Ford 
Louis John Fcritano 
Thomas Walton Fox 
Sydney Haskell Franc er 
Georgia Perkins French- 
Paula I. Friedman 
James Robert Gallagher 
Donald Edward Geer 
Gordon George Geis 
Morton Bigelow Gilbert 
Louise Isabel Gillis 
Marc Alfred Girard 
William E. Glabau 
Robert B. Gleason 
William Anthony Gogis 
Melvin Norman Goldman 
Florence Bernice Gordon 
Robert Hall Green 
Paul Greenberg 
Charles Edward Groff 
Alice Teresa Gula 
Barbara Ann Hall 
Fichard Horace Hall 
Roderick Chesley Hall, Jr. 
Lawrence Paul Hannon 
Richard C. Hansen 



Margaret Emma Hautennan 
John Richard ^enry 
-lcolm Carl ^enry 
M. Elizabeth Flint Hibbc 
John William Holloway, Jr. 
John A. Holt 
Warren Milton Holt 
Daniel James Horton 
Faymond Clement Hottinger 
Catherine Agnes Howard 

-*Frank Leo Howard, Jr. 
Patsy F. Iampietro 
Nathan Milton Insuik 
R-i chard Field Jackson 
Stenley Janus zkiewicz 
Elizabeth Ann Johnson 
F.obert William Jones 
Dana N. Jost 
Wallace John Kallaugher 
Abraham Kaufman 
Arthur Eugene Kaye 
Thomas J. Kelley 
Mary Margaret Kelly 
Robert John Kelsey 
Russell Rutherford Kenyon 
Stratton Harsburgh Kerr 
Donald Markham Kinsman 
Stephen Joseph Koziol 

*Frank Ellsworth Kramer 
Marcel Douglas Labbee 
Jerome Faymond Landry 
William Norman Lane 
Lucille Mae Langerman 
Francis George Langevin 
Claire Lillian Lavigne 
Melvin Lavin 
Richard Henry Lee 
Deborah Adeline Liber^ian 
Samuel Liberman 
William Lester Liley, Jr. 
Norma Jean Litz 
Robert Howard Lowell 
Nancy Ann Maier 
George Maurice Marcotte 
James Robert Marshall 
Margaret Mary Marshall 
John Joseph Matthews 
Thomas Joseph McGarr 
James Edward McKenzie 
Leon Joseph Menard, Jr. 
Francis Gould Mentzer, Jr. 
Anne Micka 

^Horace Newton Milliken 
Harold Arthur Miner 



1560 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Julia Lee Moore 
-"-Victor Mathison Morgan 

Marie Irene Morrison 

John Thomas Moynihan 

Edward John Murphy- 
Myron Michael Muzyka 

Marjorie Louise Nason 

Chandler Newhall Newton 

Donald George Newton 

Paul A. Nickas 

Robert Fred Noyes 

Elisabeth Ann Olaussen 

Alice Rose O'Neil 

Howard Openshaw 

Helen Osuch 

Eleanor Irene Parker 

Kenneth John Parsons 

Casper J. Psrednia 

Maynard Moore Perkins 

Wayman Thor Peterson 

Gilbert Harris Porter 

Lomer Joseph Pothler 

Alphonse Raymond Presto 

James Albert Price 
-*Langdon Prouty, Jr. 

Jason L. Radio 

Everett Jones Paynes, Jr. 

Abbott Fraser Reid 

Robert Andrew Reis 
---Fred Kellogg Richardson 
"nMary Teresa Riley 
---Joseph Philip Roberge 

William Fenton Robertson, Jr, 

Barbara Wood Robinson 

George H. Robinson, Jr. 

Kyman R. Roseman 

George Herbert Rosenfield 

Irma L. Rossman 

Norman Joseph Roy 

Merwin Herbert Rubin 

Herbert R. Rumminger 

Frances Schekman 

Robert J. Schierloh 

Ruth Erna Schlenker 

Herbert Frank Scribner 

Joseph N. Segel 



Donald Charles. Sellar 
Martin Sevoian 
Lawrence Herbert Siegel 
Carl James Sindermann 
Gloria Frances Sirine 
Charles Francis Skiff 
Marie Catherine Skiff ington 
Margaret Elizabeth Slate 
Richard Norman Smith 
Thomas Edward Smith, Jr. 
William V. Smith 
Beverly Elaine Southwick 
Edgar Winfred Spear 
Bernice Helen Staniszewski 
John Whitaker Stearns 
Eileen There se Stern 
John Henry Strand 
Barbara M. Sutton 
Elliott Leo Swartz 
Janet Sanctuary Thatcher 
Alvin Alfred Therrien 
James Thomson Timberlake 
Barbara Mae Tinkham 
Robert Alexander Tolmsn 
True Tower 

William Marshall Trousdale 
John P. Trull 
William David Tunis 
Jane Sears Vondell 
Janet Elizabeth Vondell 
Philip Allen Vondell 
Anna. Eleanor Walak 
Theresa Julia Walkowiak 
-^Stanley Edwin Waskiewicz 
John August Weidhaas, Jr. 
John Joseph Wells 
Lewis F. Wells, Jr. 
Wilma Roberta Wescott 
Herbert Elton West 
Mildred Louise West 
Lewis Matthews Whitcomb 
John ^enry White 
Elizabeth Ann Wileikis 
Michael Woynar 
Charles Merrick Wright 
Robert Rouben Zall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Summa Cum Laude 



David Patrick Buckley 



Magna Cum Laude 



Ralph Jeremiah Fishman 
■^Lorraine Silvermann Goldin 



Cum Laude 



Doris Elizabeth Abramson 
Philip John Bourque 
Clarence Adolph Burley 
Ernest William Cook 
Edward Martin Cynarski 
Gloria Zelda Eissman 
Ruth Beebe Emrick 
Leonard Foster Gardner 



Rite 



Lois Abrams 
Mary Ann Alger 
Cleo Marie Anderson 
Shirley Caldwell Anderson 
Henry Stuart Bacon 
John Leonard Baier 
Albert William Bailet 
Marion Ruth Bass 
M chard Hingham Best 
-*Jack David Betterman 
Robert Bevins 
Florence Irene Blumenthal 
Ponald Dean Boddy 
Elizabeth Katherine Boerner 
Nancy Lee Bowman 
Lindsay Boyd 
Daniel John Boylan, Jr. 
Donald James Brennan 
Patrick John Bresnahan 
Barbara Anne Brunner 
Felix Edward Buba 
Eugene Harold Bugbee 
Arthur Bertram Burtraan 
John Carmen Centracchio, Jr. 
Elizabeth Chadwick 
Florence Marcia Chapman 
Roslyn G. Cohen 
David Floyd Collier 

Henry Frink Colton, Jr. 



Robert Louis San Soucie 



Phillip George Marsh 
James Edwin Spaulding 



Shirley Leone Gibbs 
Lillyan Dee Greene 
---Arnold Murray Levin 
Alvan Morton Lisman 
Peter Jan Mozden 
Allen Silbergleit 
Robert Murray Thomas 
William Thomas Wells, Jr. 



There se Joan Conlon 
Judith Lillian Copeland 
Samuel David Coppelman 
Arlene Teresa Cormier 
Howard James Coughlin, Jr. 
John Francis Crean, Jr. 
Robert Franklin Crerie 
Schuyler Trowbridge Crowell 
John Michael Curley 
Jane Fenwick Davenport 
Dorothy Marie Davis 
Robert Edward Diamond 
John Thomas Dickmeyer 
Peter Scoville Doe 
John Joseph Donovan 
John Richard Doyle 
John Anthony Dunn 
Shirley-Marie Dunn 
Jason Sundell Elias 
Richard Akers Ellis 
Barbara Nancy Fagan 
John H. Farquharson 
William Allan Feldman 
V. Claire Foglia 
Edward Erwin Fulton 
Jack Bruce Gilbert 
M. Steve Gilman 
Edmund Joseph Godin 
Shirley Drexel Godin 






1562 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Hubert Selvyn Goldberg 
Eugene Mandly Grace 
Daniel Samson Greenfield 
Phyllis May Gruntler 
Robert Origene Guilbault 
Barbara Helen Hamilton 
James Joseph Harrington, Jr. 
Ralph Sherman Heard 
John Joseph Higgins 
Norman Sidney Holt 
Leonard Jay Horwitz 
Joan Elizabeth Hummel 
Raymond Joseph Thomas Izzo 
David Emmett Kelleher 
Charles Allen Kendall 
Clark Kendall 
Herbert Levis Kern 
Mildred Elizabeth Kinghorn 
Joseph Anthony Klejna 
Morris Koffman 
George Thomas Kopp 
Natalie Diane Korson 
Diane Rosalyn Kramer 
Charlotte Kunian 
Richard Joseph Lacey 
Robert Francis LaFountain 
Cecile Edna Laurin 
Robert Peter Leahey 
Daniel Joseph Leary, Jr. 
Cyrille Joseph Leblanc 
Richard Joseph Legrand 
Richard Webster LeRoy 
Donald Alexander Levis 
Donald Lieberman 

-*Calvin David Lijjston 
Irving I. Litman 
Gloria Anne Marchioni 
Adele Rona Margolis 
Barbara Sayre Margolis 
Sylvia Zelda Maron 
Marilyn Elisabeth McCarthy 
Edvard John McGrath, Jr. 
David Ira Mend el son 
Nancy Miller 
Milton Marcus Mondor 
Dorothy Corrine Monesi 

*John Allan Mullaly 
Marvin Keith Nadel 
Carolyn Miller Nally 
Edvard Stuart Neville 
Mary Louise Nicoll 
Valandingham Gaggott Nisbeth 
Manuel Nunes 
Richard Myron Ober 



Mary Therese O'Brien 
Constance O'Keefe 
Crosby Olinto 

Raymond George O'Neill, Jr, 
Peter Pacocha 
Carol Parker 
Virginia Aileen Parker 
Faith Eveline Pelton 
Henry A. Perry 
Richard D. Pickett 
Norma Aline Pinckney 
William Midgley Potter, Jr, 
Margaret Gay Pratt 
Barbara Therese Pure ell 
Donald Paul Ray 
Virginia Ann Rice 
Patricia Helena Richardson 
James Walter Ritchie 
William Everett Robinson 
Earl Bernard Rodriguez 
Ruth Gloria Rosenthal 
Arthur Ernest Rove 
George Albin Runquist 
Dorothy Anne Saulnier 

-^Abraham Max Shaponik 
Francis Thomas Shea 

*John Rosier Sherman 
Milton Shore 

Frederick Cabot Skolfield 
James Morrill Smith, Jr. 
Charlotte Alice Snov 
Calvin Milton Spivak 
Naomi Lenore Spreiregen 
Paul Daniel Stenard 
Patricia Mary Stevens 
Waldo A. Stevens 
David Louis Sudhalter 
Max Svartz 
Beverly Bruce Sykes 
Walter F. Szetela, Jr. 
Eileen Ruth Tananbaum 
Peter Joseph Tassinari 
Robert William Tetrault 
Donald Nevton Thatcher 
Leon Chester Thresher 
Roslaide Myra Tolman 
Earl Felix Tonet 
Robert William Toohey 
Alison Trombla 
Emily Lambert Trott 
Arlyne Lorraine Vilker 

Marilyn Jean Walsh 

Levis Weinstein 
Charles Joseph White 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



David Wolf 

Robert Clifford Woodies 
Ruth Marilyn Worthing 
George Edward Wright 



David Yarosh 
Betty A. Young 
Edward Young 
Theodore John Ziemba 



Adolph Michael Zukowski 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



John Thomas Conlon 

Francis John Joseph Connerney 

Aram Karney Conragan, Jr. 

William J. Dowling 

Robert Gordon 

John Donahue Kelly 

Ray Young Kline 

Edward Bar tie tt Wirt 



Anthony Eddie Koptuck 
Norman Landesman 
Warren Hastings Lovelace 
Richard Andrew Lucas 
Mahlon Earl Scott 
Kenneth Elton Spaulding 
Richard Condon Tisdell 



CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

George Cushing Whorf 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Henry Raymond Macina 



Harold John Publicover 



Francis Keith Sheehan 

CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Robert Gordon Raymond 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Cum Laude 



5o 



Joseph Andrew DeCarlo 



Rite 

Edgar Seaverns Burkhardt, Jr. 
Edward Allen Chambers 
William Roy Higgins 
Michael Francis Kelly, Jr. 

Walter Spokowski 



Joseph Louis "Magri 
Clovis Andrew Prendergast 
George Francis Robichaud 
Charles Edward Savage, Jr< 



1564 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 

Cum Laude 

Robert Edmund Bertram 

Rite 



Richard Milton Brown *Christos Charles Mpelkas 

George Elliott Yetman 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGFEE OF 
BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Janet Lois Fraas 

John Robinson Lawrence 



*As of the Class of 1943 



Edward William Muller, Jr, 
Alden Dary Ridley 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Moharaed Sayed Abdel-Rahman 
Theodore Roosevelt Adams 
Robert John Allen, Jr. 
Clinton Ralph Blackmon 
John Robarts Blalock 
Maurice Blauer 
Warren Julius Bodendorf 
Joseph Edward Brinson 
Margaret Carol Cassidy 
John Joseph Cohan 
Suzanne Colson-Fifer 
Clark Edward Corliss 
John Harold Crain, Jr. 
Joan Brooks de Revere 
Warren Spencer Dobson 
Margaret P. Donovan 
William Otho Drinkwater 
Paul Ellen 
Fred Herbert Emmert 
Charles Clifford Entwistle 
James Edward Falvey 
Eleanor Clark Fillmore 
Robert Alan Fitzpatriek 
Muriel Adele Francoeur 
Jose J. Franco Betancourt 
William Henry Green, Jr. 



Louis Peter Greenberg 
Maurice Louis Guss 
Arthur Roland Hastings 
Robert Lee Hemond 
Ward Martin Hunting 
M. Milton Kaplan 
Nancy Jeanne Kelleher 
Jack Lester Lapuck 
Theodore H. Levine 
Pei-Hsing Lin 
Dorothea Ann Lohmann 
Ralph Stephen Lucardi 
A. Marie McCarthy 
John Paul McDonough 
Harold Hubert McLean 
Ellen Hastings Morse 
Roy Edgar Moser, Jr. 
Leo Francis Mulvaney 
Michael Neznayko, Jr. 
Frederick Barnes Oakes 
Thomas Judge 0' Grady 
Alton Gif ford Perkins 
Gilbert Reising, Jr. 
Louis Frederick Ruder, 
Glenn C. Russell 
Stanley Francis Salwak 



Jr, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Irving Herbert Schlafman Gordon Franklin Thomas 

Roy Edward Sigafus Betty Lou Travis 

John LeBaron Spencer William James Wall, Jr. 

Paul Herbert Struthers Charles Newton Warner 

James Joseph Tattersall Charles James Wiley 

Jose Terrazas Loyola Margaret Koerber Wilhelm 

George Staples Yee 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Azmi A. Afifi Chaudhry Mohammed Ishaq 

Edward Everett Anderson Omer Kosker 

Garland Booker Bass Andre Patron 

R. Kemal Gokce Rajupalli Ramamurti Reddi 

Dale Albert Hinkle Donald Bernard Seeley 

Clara Edith Weir 

On the recommendation of the President and of the 

Faculty of the Graduate School, it was 

VOTED : To award the degree Master of Science to those 
candidates listed above and to award the degree 
Doctor of Philosophy to those candidates 
listed above. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To authorize payment from Student Trust Funds 
of annual extra compensation to the following 
members of the staff as recommended by the 
Faculty Academics Activities Board and en- 
dorsed by the President. 

Lawrence S . Dickinson. ........... $150 

Arthur B. Musgrave 75 

H. Leland Varley 75 

Charles N. DuBois 75 

Leonta G. Horrigan 75 

Doric Alviani 100 

James Robertson, Jr 100 

Ezra Schabas 100 

Arthur E. Niedeck 150 

Anthony W. Zaitz 75 

There was discussion of further applications for 

sabbatical leaves during the college year 194-9-50. It was 

VOTED : To retain the present policy as to sabbatical 

leave but in view of the peak load of students 

expected in the year 194-9-50 to approve no 
further sabbatical leaves during that period. 



1565 






Academics 

Activities 

Coaches 






Sabbatical 
Leaves 



1566 



TRUSTEE 



Promotions 

and 
Apnointments 

Milo Kimball 

Vernon P. 
Hei ming 

Frederick S. 
Troy- 



Douglas N. Stern 



Edgar E. Lindsey 



Appointment of 
Warren P. 
McGuirk 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Van Meter submitted several promotions and 
new appointments to the Board. In each case the promotion or 
appointment has been initially recommended by the head of the de- 
partment concerned, by the dean of the school and then by the 
University dean or the Director of the Extension Service. 

The Trustees considered each nominee separately and 

VOTED : To approve the following promotions and 
appointments : 

Milo Kimball from Associate Professor to Professor 

of Business Administration effective September 1, 1949 • 

Vernon P. Helming from Associate Professor to Pro- 
fessor of English effective September 1, 1949. 

Frederick S. Troy from Associate Professor to Pro- 
fessor of English effective upon the retirement of 
Professor Walter E. Prince (probable date 
September 1, 1949). 

Douglas N. Stern to Extension Professor of Animal 
Pathology effective June 6, 1949- 

Edgar E. Lindsey to Professor of Chemical Engineer- 
ing effective September 1, 1949. 

President Van Meter announced that Curry S. Hicks, 
Head of the Division of Physical Education expects to retire 
August 31 > 1949. Upon learning of the expected retirement, the 
President appointed a committee to locate a successor to Pro- 
fessor Hicks. This committee .was composed of Philip F. Whitmore, 
Trustee, as Chairman; faculty representatives Earle S. Carpenter, 
Robert D. Hawley, Marshall 0. Lanphear, Emory Grayson, Frederick 
S. Troy, Walter S. Ritchie, and William L. Machmer; Alumni repre- 
sentatives Dennis Crowley, Harold Poole, Clarence Clark. This 
committee examined the records of a large number of applicants 
and interviewed many of these applicants personally. The 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

committee was unanimous in recommending appointment of Warren P. 
McGuirk who is now with the Maiden High School. 

The Trustees asked many Questions about the other candi- 
dates who had been recommended for the position. Trustee Whitmore 
spoke for his committee and said that the committee had been very- 
careful in examining records and in interviewing applicants and 
that the committee was unanimous in its feeling that Mr. McGuirk 
was by far the most outstanding candidate for the position. 
After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To appoint Warren p. McGuirk as Head of the 
Division of Physical Education effective on 
the retirement of Curry S. Hicks with 
probable date of September 1, 194-9. 

It was 

VOTED : To elect Walter E. Prince as Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of English on the date of his retire- 
ment . 

It was 

VOTED : To elect Curry S. Hicks as Emeritus Professor 
of Physical Education on the date of his re- 
tirement . 

Trustee Deely raised question as to the relative number 
of professors, associate professors, assistant professors and in- 
structors on the staff of the University and how the University 
compares with other colleges and universities in this matter. 

Trustee Bartlett asked that the administration study 
this matter and report at next year's meeting. He also asked that 
the question be referred to the Trustee Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study. 

Upon the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 



1567 



Emeritus Pio- 
fessor Walter 
E. Prince 



Emeritus Pro- 
fessor Curry S. 
Hicks 

Staff, teaching 
percentage of 



1568 



TRUSTEE 



Dormitories 

Hamlin House 
Knowlton House 
Brooks House 



Public Health 
fees 



Assistant 
Treasurer - 
L. Lawrence 
Taylor 



Supplementary- 
Bur! get 



Next Meeting 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To name the most northerly of the two dormi- 
tories being constructed on North Pleasant 
Street Hamlin House in honor of Miss Margaret 
Hamlin for many years Director of Placement 
for Women at the University; to name the 
southerly dormitory of the two being con- 
structed on North Pleasant Street Knowlton 
House in memory of Miss Helen Knowlton, 
former teacher of Home Economics at the 
University; to name the new Men's Dormitory 
Brooks House in memory of Dr. William Penn 
Brooks, former Head of the Division of Agri- 
culture and Director of the Experiment Station 
and Acting President of the University. 

On the recommendation of Treasurer Hawley and President 

Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : T authorize the following fees for a special 
12 weeks summer course in Public Health during 
the summer of 194-9? these fees to cover tuition, 
board, room and miscellaneous charges: 

for residents of the Commonwealth $225 

for non residents 34-5 

On the recommendation of Treasurer Hawley and President 

Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To authorize L. Lawrence Taylor Assistant 
Treasurer to sign, in the absence of the 
Treasurer, such official documents of the 
University as require the signature of the 
financial officer in charge. 

The Treasurer discussed a proposal from the administra- 
tion for a Supplementary Budget for the fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 194-9 • The budget was considered item by item and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to submit a 

Supplementary Budget request for the fiscal 
year 1950 in the amount of $214-,900. 

It was 

VOTED: To meet at the University on Wednesday, 
July 20, to consider the budget for the 
year beginning July 1, 1950. 



1569 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Bartlett said that the Commission on Administra- 
tion and Finance has been authorized by the Legislature to take 
over the closing of Devens. The Commission has sent notices to 
several members of the faculty that their services will not be re- 
quired after about the middle of June. Vice President Williams 
feels that the men should have longer notice and has asked the 
Trustees for assistance in presenting their views to the Commission 
It was agreed that President Van dieter would talk with Dr. 
Williams and prepare a statement which might be sent out to the 
augmented Board of Trustees to inform them of this matter and to 
obtain a recommendation from members of the Board. 

Trustee Brett spoke of interest on the part of Alumni in 

setting up a trust to handle gifts and bequests of Alumni. He 

said that the Alumni would probably respond more freely if such a 

fund were set up to be administered by Alumni representatives. 

It was 

VOTED : To refer this matter to the Executive 

Committee for later report to the Board. 

Treasurer Hawley discussed the investigation of the 

Boarding Hall by the Commission on Administration and finance. He 

said that the Commission's report is very critical of the present 

manager but that he did not feel that a change in management now 

would solve the problem of providing better food to the students 

and better management of the Boarding Hall enterprise. He said 

he felt much of the trouble during the present year has come from 

the Administration' s relaxation of its rule requiring freshmen and 

dormitory residents to eat on the campus. After discussion, it 

was 



Devens - 
closing of 



Gifts 



Boarding Hall 



Board Rates 



1570 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To require freshmen and residents of 

dormitories, except seniors, to eat at 
the Boarding Hall on a 5-day week basis 
unless excused by the Dean. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve a rate of $8.75 for five days 
or 15 meals and a cash rate of $1.90 
per day. Tickets will be sold in advance 
for one semester with provision for stu- 
dents to pay each semester's board in two 
installments - one in the beginning and 
one at mid- semester. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1 o'clock. 



O^iXfjU, AA^Q <*SK£fictL 



<"-- 



Chairman 



_Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Minutes of Meeting of Board of Trustees 

July 20, 19-49, 11:00 A.M., Farley 4-H Club House, Amherst, Mass 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Deely, Haigis, Orton, 

Hubbard, Chandler, Brown, Taber, Whitmore, 
Mrs. McNamara, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and with 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

President Van Meter informed the Trustees that 
requisitions for approximately 250 temporary positions have beer 
held up in the Personnel Office and that persons occupying 
these positions since July 1 are doing so without author- 
ization and with no assurance of being paid or continued in 
employment. The Administration has been unab : e to get any 
explanation as to why the authorizations for these positions 
have been held up. Yesterday the President telegraphed to 
the Governor asking what could be done to clear this matter 
up and today the Personnel Office has telephoned releasing most 
of the 250 persons. However some 55 positions are still 
being held up. It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Chairman of the Board to 

telegraph the Governor's Office requesting clar- 
ification of the reason for the approximately 55 
positions being held up; also asking if the 
encumbents of these positions are to be discharged. 

The Trustees then considered the budget for 1951 

item by item and 

VOTED : T,o authorize the Administration to submit a 
budget as follows: 



15 



Personnel 



1572 



TRUSTEE 



Budget 



Fees - 

Control 

Laws 



Tuition for 

in-state 

students 



Capital Out- 
lay Program 



Five-year 

buildinc 

Drogram 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1. 


Administration $ 179,365 


2. 


Instruction 2,4-06,876 


3. 


Extension Service 287,080 


4. 


Experiment Station 4-66,615 


5. 


Control 258,258 


6. 


Operation of Plant 1,14.1,150 


7. 


Boarding Hall 609,800 


It 


was also 


VOTED: 


To authorize the Administration to 



such amount s.s may be needed to meet increased 
salary costs if salaries are increased by State 
action. 

Question was raised as to whether fees charged under 

Control Laws should be increased. It was 

VOTED : To request that this subject be discussed at a 
future meeting at which time the Treasurer will 
present more information concerning fees charged 
under Control Laws. 

There was discussion as to whether the tuition for 

in-state students should, be increased, end it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Chairman to appoint a committee 
of five to consider tuition charges. 

The Trustees then considered the capital outlay budget 

of the University. It was explained that the first 18 items 

in the 1951 list are repeated from the 1950 budget since no 

action has been taken on this budget at the present time. 



It was 



VOTED : To approve the following list of 47 capital outlay 
items, totaling 15,789,950 for 1951 (including 1950 
items) and $5, 884-, 500 for the remaining four years 
of the five year period. 

(See attached) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion of keeping of pets in University 

buildings. President Van Meter said that he had submitted to 

each member of the Board a written statement by the pet owners 

and a written statement by Mr. Randolph in charge of housing. 

There was very lengthy discussion of this matter and it was 

VOTED : To affirm rule of the University that no pets be 
allowed in student housing units 3 

Tresurer Hawley said that the administrator of the 
Frank H. Plumb estate has asked that the Trustees accept an 
amount of $13>379«97 and discharge the administrator of the estate 
as having fulfilled the conditions of the will. The Treasurer 
said that the income from this fund may be used for scholar- 
ship awards or loans to students of Agriculture. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to accept the Plumb 

bequest of $13>379»97 and to sign a release for the 
administrator of the estate. 

President Van Meter said that there is more need for 
scholarship funds than for loan funds for students in Agri- 
culture since the Lotta Crabtre-' loan fund is very generous. 
It was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to use the income from 
the Frank H. Plumb fund for scholarship grants 
under terms of the will. 

Treasurer Hawley said that a committee composed of the 

chairman of the Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds, 

architect and administrative officers of the University met 

on July 5 and inspected Gunness Laboratory. The Committee 

recommends that the building be accepted as of May 1, 194-9. 

It was 



1573 



Pets 



Frank H. Plumb 
estate 



Scholarship 
Funds 



Gunness 
Laboratory 



t 



1574 



TRUSTEE 



Unearmarked 
Trust Funds 



Association of 
Governing 
Boards of State 
Universities & 
Allied Insti- 
tutions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To accept Gunness laboratory as of May 1, 194-9. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve expenditures by the President from un- 
earmarked trust funds in the amount of $598-44 for 
the period July 1, 1948 through June 30, 194-9. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to expend not to 

exceed $1,000 from unearmarked trust funds during 
the year beginning July 1, 194-9. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Chairman to appoint a delegate to 
attend the annual meeting of the Association of 
Governing Boards of State Universities and Allied 
Institutions. This meeting is scheduled for 
Denver, Colorado. The Chairman appointed Trustee 
Whitmore to represent the Board at this meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 P.M. 

j 




James W. Burke 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees 

I Chairman 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACKUSS'.'. 



ima 



5~YE "30GRAM FOR CAPITAL OUTLAY 



**1„ 



*»4. 



**8 , 

**9 9 

**io » 

**n, 

**12 . 



**15 ." 

**21. 



23- 

24, 

25 « 
26 » 

25., 

29 . 



30, 
31 1 

32 c 

**33, 
**34 e 
**35 * 

380 

#^'2 



W. 



il&ing 



Engineering Building & Equipment 
Dining Coma 

Construction of Cavalry Stable for ROTO 
Addition to Chemistry Laboratory 
Replacement of Durfee Conservatory 
Replacement of Sky-Light, Phys. Sd. Cage 
Construction of Laboratory & Other 

Improvements. French Kail 
Reconstruction of Paige Laboratory 
Poultry Plant 
Farm Building 

Dairy Industry Bldg. , Reprs. & Iiapts. 
Addition to Library 
Garage and Storage 

Clark Kill Road and Connecting Roads 
Section Bldge, for Animal Disease Control 
Turbine Plant Extension 
Extension of Utility Service Lines 
Public Health Building 
Classroom Building - first section 
Steam Engineer Ing Laboratory 
Forestry Laboratory Headquarters & Equip. 
Farm Improvements 
Addition to Arena and Abbatolr 
Horns Management House 
Physical Education Improvements 
Greenhouse Reprs. , & Add. - V/altham 
Parking A3?ea* for 100 Cars - Waltham 
Barn & Lab, for Research in Animal Industry 
Const, of Laboratory at Marshall Hall 



,'r 



^636,050* 

750,000* 

65*000* 

750,000* 

50,000* 

20,000* 

10,000* 
15,000* 
72,500* 
■75,000* 
36,000* 

sob'.bbb* 
9o,oor 
45,000* 

90,000* 
150,000* 

250,0c 
500,000* 
1,000.000 
135 , 000 

35*000 

26,400 

230^000 

30,000 
44,000 

13,000 

10 , 000 

127,000 

35,00a 



Armor y-Aud i t or ium 

Infirmary 

Student Union Building 

Add, to Food Technology Laboratory 

Vep,c Card. Service and Lab. Bldg. 

Agronomy Demonstration Greenhouse 

Zoology-Entomology Greenhouse - Animal House 

Add. & Xmots, - French Kail Greenhouses 
Service £f Lab. Bld{> for Horticulture 
Addition to Clark Kail, i: y 
Addition to Ago Engr e Building 



1952 
1,000,000 

500,000 

600 , coo 

300,000 

75*000 

35,000 

20,000 

29,500 

75,000 
4501,000 
15c 000 



■§5,789,950 



3,: 500 



* From 1950 Budget 
** These items have been included- in 5 -Year Program of the 

Massachusetts Public Building Commission. (In some cases 

for different years and amounts). 



B( 
Ji 

a: 
t\ 



-fc. 



brought forward 



1953 



$9,024,450 



41 „ Improvements to Booker Auditorium 75,000 

42. Physical Education Building for Women 750,000 

43. ¥om©a«s Athletic Field 75 , 000 



™» 7 ^t^p 



44* Music & Fine Arts Building 
Adasinlstration Building 
Boreaitory for Women 



■-t/J* 

4-6, 



400,000 

750,000 



ec&9«Kril&-«w3«3afa' 



1, 650,000 



47. Sortie© Building for Plant 



a awaMtt CTfc^.'St^a^S- 



100.000 



GRMD TOTAL 



111,674,450 



■.-.-.. ■-_!* '.T . 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



September 26, 1949 

Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated September 20 from Treasurer 

Havley to members of the Board of Trustees of the University of 

Massachusetts and the resultant mail ballot are hereby made part 

of the official records of the Board. 

September 20, 1949 

To: The Board of Trustees 



Subject 



Architectural and Engineering Services 
for New Construction 



Gentlemen: 



The Capital Outlay Program for the current year, as 
recently authorized byothe Legislature, provides for three 
projects for the University as follows: 



1. Improvements to Utility Distribution System 

2. Improvements to Electrical Generating Plant 

3. Construction of Reserve Officers Training 

Corps Facilities 



1154,000 
185,000 

65,000 



$404,000 



The First step is the selection of engineer and archi- 
tect for preparation of plans and specification for this work. 
We have consulted with the Public Building Commission and they 
have asked us to submit recommendations, listing three firms for 
each project, although specifying the one preferred. 

The obvious choice for engineering services on the 
first two projects is the Mollis French Company of Boston. This 
company made a study last year of our plant and utility service 
line needs and drew the plans and specifications for the vork 
done thus year on the utility service lines. In order to aieet the 
requirements of the Public Building Commission, it is our 
recommendation that they be listed first, with indication of our 
preference for their services. 



=T 



1575 



Architectural 

and Engineering: 
Services for 
New Construction 



1576 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1. Hollis French Company, of Boston 

2. Varner-MacNeish, of Springfield 
3- E. C. Brown, of Boston 

For architectural services on the ROTC Cons true ticn, the 
logical firm is Alderman and Alderman of Holyoke. This firm did 
preliminary plans for us last year without charge and they under- 
stand our needs better than anyone else. Second, James A. Britton 
of Greenfield. Third, Hampson and Fisher of Pittsfield. 

President Van Meter and Dr. Bartlett hare authorized me 
to submit this matter to the Board of Trustees by mail with the 
recommendation that the Treasurer be authorized to recommend 
appointments for engineering and architectural services as 
described above, and that he be authorized to enter into contracts 
with Hollis French Company, of Boston, and with Alderman and 
Alderman, of Holyoke, for services on these projects, if and when, 
their appointment is approved by the Massachusetts Public Building 
Commission. 

A ballot form and returned stamped envelope are enclosed 
for your convenience. 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ F.obert D. Hawley 
Treasurer 



Mail Bal lot 

In accordance with the recommendations of the Treasurer 
in his letter of September- 19, 194-9: 

VOTED : For Engineering Services for the two projects: 
Improvements to Utility Distribution Systems 
and Improvements to Electrical Generating 
Plant, the Treasurer is authorized to recommend 
to the Public Building Commission, three firms, 
as follows, with preference specified for the 
first: 

1. Hollis French Company, of Boston 

2. Warner-Mac^eish, of Springfield 

3. E. C. Brown, of Boston 

The Treasurer is also authorized to execute 
a contract with Hollis French Company for 
engineering services for Improvements to 
Utility Distribution Systems and Improvements 
to Electrical Generating Plant in the name of 
and for the Board of Trustees. 



Approved^ 



Not approved_ 



VOTED: 



3TEE 



Approved: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



For architectural Services for the con- 
struction of ROTC Facilities, the Treasurer 
is authorized to recommend to the Public 
Building Commission three firms, as follows, 
with preference specified for the first: 

1. Alderman & Alderman, of Holyoke 

2. James A. Britton, of Greenfield 

3. Hampson & Fisher, of Pittsfield 

The Treasurer is also authorized to execute 
a contract with Alderman and Alderman for 
architectural services for the construction 
of ROTC Facilities in the name of and for 
the Board of Trustees. 



Approved_ 



Not appro ved_ 



R. A. Van Meter 
Philip F. '"hit-more 
Villiam M. Cashin 
John J. Desmond, Jr, 
Joseph V. Bartlett 
Ernest Hof tyzer 
A. C. Brett 



Clifford C. Hubbard 
John Chandler 
Leonard Carmichael 
Harry Dunlap Brown 
Elizabeth L. xicKamara 
Ralph F. Taber 




Secretary 



^ 



<r<+^L~ "^5 a^Eft^ Chairman 












1578 



TRUSTEE 



Nominating 
Committee 



Honorary 
Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January 19, 1950, 10:30 A.M., State House, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees - Governor Dever, Vhitmore, 
Haigis, Hubbard, Taber, Desmond, 
Brown, Carmichael, Cashin, Mrs. Leach, 
Mrs. McNamara, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 

At the request of Chairman Bartlett who was absent, 

Trustee Vhitmore called the meeting to order and requested that the 

Trustees elect a chairman to serve in the absence of Dr. Bartlett. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED: To elect Trustee Vhitmore to serve as 
chairman. 

It was 

VOTED: To dispense with reading of the call and 
reading of minutes of the last previous 
meeting. 

Mr. Vhitmore appointed the following committee to escort 
the Governor to the meeting. Mrs. McNamara, Chairman; Trustees 
Cashin and Taber. 

President Van Meter presented recommendations of the 

faculty committee on honorary degrees and recommended that the 

Board approve the nominations of the committee. After separate 

discussion of each recommendation, it was 

VOTED: To award the following honorary degrees 
at the 1950 Commencement: 

Herbert C. Brewer '13 - Doctor of Science 
Earl Sumner Draper '15 - Doctor of Landscape Archi- 
tecture 
George Freeman Parmenter '00 - Doctor of Science 
Percy LeBaron Spencer - Doctor of Science 
Ernest Elwood Stanford '15 - Doctor of Science 
Charles Hiram Thayer - Bachelor of Agriculture 
Sidney B. Vaugh, Sp.»24 - Doctor of Fine Arts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Van Meter presented recommendations of the 
University Committee on Course of Study for new courses to be 
offered by the University in various schools and departments. The 
President discussed each course and answered questions of the 
Trustees. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached new courses of study. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To accept a scholarship of f50.00 per 

semester from the Massachusetts Milk In- 
spectors' Association to be awarded to a 
worthy male undergraduate student who is 
studying in the field of sanitation deal- 
ing with the quality control of milk, in 
either the four-year course or in the 
Stock bridge School of Agriculture; students 
are to be chosen by a committee of the 
Association upon recommendation of the Head 
of the Department of Dairy Industry, the 
Head of the Department of Bacteriology and 
Public Health and the Dean of the University. 

On the recommendation of the School of Liberal Arts and 

of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To authorize award of the degree Master of 
Arts beginning with the June 1951 Commence- 
ment. 

There was discussion as to University policy on 
acceptance of out-of-state students in the undergraduate college. 
During the period 1945-194-8, on the recommendation of the Universi- 
ty administration, the Trustees adopted a priority system on ad- 
mission of students which practically precluded acceptance of out- 
of-state students. This policy was adopted in view of the large 
number of in-state students who were seeking admission. In 
discussion of the question, the Trustees expressed the belief that 

the University should begin to accept out-of-state students so 
that the college will not become too provincial and so that 



New 
Courses 



Scholarship 



Massachusetts 
Milk 

Inspectors' 
Association 



Master of 
Arts Degree 



Out-of-state 
Students 






1580 



TRUSTEE 



President's 
Annual Peport 



Treasurer's 
Annual Report 



Boarding Hall 
survey of 



Public Health 
Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Massachusetts students may have the opportunity of meeting and 

living with students from other areas. After discussion, it vas 

VOTED: To authorize the administration to accept 
out-of-state students in such numbers as 
the administration feels to be desirable - 
this policy to begin with students accepted 
for registration in September of 1950. 

President Van Meter presented his annual report to the 

Trustees, and it vas 

VOTED : To accept the report as presented. 

Treasurer Hawley presented his annual report, and it vas 

VOTED: To accept the report of the Treasurer as 
presented. 

Treasurer Hawley discussed the operations of the Uni- 
versity boarding hall and spoke of recent recommendation of the 
Commission on Administration and Finance that the University em- 
ploy a concessionaire to operate the boarding halls. He said 
that the Executive Committee has met recently to discuss this 
problem and it was the feeling of members of the committee that 
more information is needed. Upon the recommendation of the 
Treasurer and the President, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to arrange for 
a survey of the boarding hall operations 
at the University by Mrs. Mary DeGarmo Bryan, 
Director of Food Services, Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 

President Van Meter outlined to the Board a proposed 

agreement for the establishment and operation of a New England 

Field Training Center for public health workers at the University, 

The center would be operated under the immediate direction of the 

Head of the Department of Bacteriology and Public Health at the 

University of Massachusetts. Cooperating in the program would be 



1581 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Massachusetts State Department of Public Health, the University 
of Massachusetts, selected local health departments in Massachusetts 
and the United States Public Health Service. After discussion, it 

was 



TOTED : To authorize the University to proceed with 
the agreement as outlined in the attached 
material. 

Trustee Whitmore said that the Alumni Association of the 
University has proposed the establishment of a University of Massa- 
chusetts Foundation to serve as legal custodian and administrator 
of wills, gifts and bequests to the University. It is proposed to 
incorporate the foundation and a set of by-laws has been drawn up. 
It was 

VOT ED: To refer consideration of the proposed 

foundation to the Executive Committee of 
the Board of Trustees for further study and 
with the request that the Executive Committee 
make recommendation to the full Board. 

Trustee Haigis, chairman of the Trustee Committee on 

Finance, reported on actions of his committee taken during meeting 

on January 4-» On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Finance, it was 

VOTED: To confirm the following transactions in 
securities during the 19A9 calendar year 
as requested by the agent for endowment 
funds : 

Matured bond August 2, $5,000, Central 
Pacific Railroad, 4 ! s, $5,000. 

Withdrawal November 22, 194-9 for deposit 
in Savings Bank, $5,204.-75 • 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Foundation 



Securities o** 
the College 



1582 



TRUSTEE 



A. A. Brown - 
land 



L. Lawrence 
Taylor 



Student Loans - 
cancellation of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED; To authorize the rental of four acres of 
land on East Pleasant Street, Amherst, 
from A. A. Brown at a cost of $200 per 
year for five years. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Assistant Treasurer of the 
University of Massachusetts, L. Lawrence 
Taylor, in the absence of the Treasurer, 
to sign such official documents of the 
University as require signature of the 
financial officer in charge. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize L. Lawrence Taylor, Assistant 

Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
to sign any and all checks, withdrawal orders, 
drafts, certificates of deposit, and all other- 
documents required to be signed or endorsed 
in the name and behalf of the University of 
Massachusetts or the Board of Trustees of 
said University of Massachusetts in order to 
deal with, withdraw from, and deposit to any 
bank accounts of the University of Massachusetts, 



It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to cancel the 
following seven student notes which have 
become outlawed: 



Name 

Allan T. Fuller 
Marshall Holt 
Gardner C Lombard 
John P. Morrison 
Leonard Pice 
Henry R. Surgen 
Malcolm H. Adams 



Date of No te Date of Maturity Amount 



May 15, 1940 
March 16, 1933 
Feb. 19, 1936 
Oct. 3, 193^ 
Jan. 14, 1937 
Jan. 23, 1942 
Feb. 12, 1934 



Sept. 15, 1940 


$27.65 


May 16, 1938 


75.45 


Sept. 19, 1936 


141.00 


Oct. 3, 1939 


32.10 


March 14, 1937 


63.39 


July 23, 1942 


26.95 


August 12, 1934 


135.40 



Trustee Hubbard, chairman of the Special Committee on 
Tuition and Fees, reported on the meeting of his committee 
January 4? 1950. On the recommendation of this committee, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: To increase the Nursery School tuition at 
the University from the present $10 per 
semester to $25 per semester effective 
September 1, 1950. 

Trustee Hubbard dissented in this vote. 

Dr. Hubbard spoke briefly of the discussions of his 

committee on tuition fees for students at the University and on 

the fees charged for feed, seed, fertilizer and poultry tests. It 

was 

VOTED : To accept Dr. Hubbard's report as a report 
of progress and to continue this special 
committee. 

The Chairman of the Finance Committee spoke of the con- 
sideration given by that committee to the advisability of changing 
the agency for the custody of Endowment Fund securities. He called 
upon the Treasurer who recommended that the agency be transferred 
from the Springfield Safe Deposit and Trust Company to the First 
National Bank of Amherst. He explained that the Amherst bank has 
a competent Trust Department and that its proximity to the Univer- 
sity would be a great convenience in the handling of investment 
matters. It was 

VOTED : To terminate agreement dated January 22, 1937 
with the Springfield Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company and to authorize the Treasurer to 
withdraw securities and funds in accordance 
with the terms of said agreement. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to negotiate an 
agreement with the First National Bank of 
Amherst for custody of Endowment Securities 
in accordance with the terms of their proposal 
of January 13, 1950, said agreement to be sub- 
ject to approval of the Finance Committee; 
and to authorize the Treasurer to transfer to 
said First National Bank of Amherst all Endow- 
ment Fund Securities for custody and supervision 
in accordance with the terms of said agreement. 



1583 



Nursery School 



tuition 



Committee on 
Tuition Fees 



Springfield 
Safe Deposit 
and Trust 
Company 



Securities 



Endowment 
Securities 



1584 



TRUSTEE 

Ratification 
of Actions 



Promotions 



George W. 
Al^°r^an 

Alfred W. 
Boicourt 



Theodore 
Kozlowski 



Theodore 
Kozlowski - 
Head of Depart- 
ment 



A. Vincent Osraun 

Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of 
Botany- 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Reuben E. 
TripDensee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To approve and ratify actions of all 

committees of the Board since the date 
of the last annual meeting. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VO TED; To approve the following promotions: 

George W. Alderman from Associate Professor to 
Professor of Physics effective September 1, 1949. 

Alfred W. Boicourt from Associate Professor to 
Professor of Horticulture effective February 1, 
1950. 

Theodore Kozlowski from Associate Professor to 
Acting Head of the Department of Botany 
effective February 1, 1950. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to confirm 
Dr. Kozlowski as permanent Head of the 
Department of Botany if the President 
so desires after Dr. Kozlowski has 
served for one year as Acting Head. 

It was 

VOTED: To elect A. Vincent Osmun Emeritus Professor 
of Botany upon his retirement on January yi, 
1950 from Head of the Department of Botany 
after 4-6 years of service at the University. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the following sabbatical leaves 
at full pay provided that either no substi- 
tute is required or that the Legislature 
appropriates funds for the employment of sub- 
stitutes: 

Reuben E. Trippensee, Professor of Wildlife 
Management for the semester beginning 
February 1, 1951 to visit schools offering 
Wildlife Management programs in the southern 
states and to inspect Wildlife Management 
operations of federal and state governments 
in the southeast. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Harry N. Glide, Professor of Philosophy, for 
the semester beginning February 1, 1951 to 
attend the University of California at 
Berkeley and to attend a six weeks school of 
comparative philosophy at the University of 
Hawaii . 

S. Church Hubbard, Assistant Professor of 
Floriculture, during the semester beginning 
February 1, 1951 for the preparation of a 
text book dealing with the use of herbaceous 
perennial plants, for conferences with 
commercial flower growers in New England, 
and for visits to herbaceous nurseries, parks 
and private estates to obtain colored photo- 
graphs of representative groups of perennial 
plants for use in class work. 

Puth Mclntire, Extension Specialist in Recrea- 
tion, for the period July through September 
1950 for travel to study activities and 
organized programs of home and community 
recreation in the Scandinavian countries and 
to attend the international conference of the 
Associated Country Women of the World at 
Copenhagen; also for three months during the 
first half of 1951 to study Extension Service 
recreational programs in other states and to 
attend Extension summer school courses at 
Colorado A. & M. College. 

Oliver C. Roberts, Associate Professor of 
Pomology, for the pe riod September 1, 1950 
through January 31, 1951 to visit the major 
fruit growing areas of the United States to 
study the market handling of fruits. 

The Nominating Committee presented its recommendations 

concerning officers for the coming year and membership on 

committees of the Board. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Secretary to cast one ballot 
for the officers and committee members as 
recommended by the Nominating Committee and 
as listed below: 



585 



Harry N. Glick 



S. Church 
Hubbard 



Ruth Mclntire 






Oliver C. 
Roberts 



i 



Nominating 
Committee 



u _ a r^i lil 



1586 



TRUSTEE 



Committees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President, Paul A. Dever 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bartlett 

Secretary, James W. Burke 
Treasurer, Robert D. Hawley 

Committee o n Faculty and Program of Study 

Leonard Carmichael, Chairman Clifford C. Hubbard 
William A. Orton Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 

John J. Desmond 



Committee on Extension Service 

Mrs. Joseph S. Leach, Chairman 
William A. Orton 
Harry D. Brown 

Committee on Experiment Station 
Alden C. Brett, Chairman 
John Chandler 
John M. Deely 



John Chandler 
William M. Cashin 



Ernest Koftyzer 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 



Committee on Agric ultur e and Horticulture 

John Chandler, Chairman Ernest Hoftyzer 

Harry D. Brown William M. Cashin 

John W. Haigis 



Comm ittee on Buildings and Ground s 
Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John M. Deely 

Committee on Finance 

John W. Haigis, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
William M. Cashin 

Committ ee on Legi slation 

Ralph F. Taber, Chairman 
John W. Haigis 
John M. Deely 

Executive Com mittee^ 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Leonard Carmichael 



Clifford C. Hubbard 
Ralph F. Taber 



Ralph F. Taber 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Clifford C. Hubbard 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 



Mrs. Joseph S. Leach 
Philip F. Whitmore 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 P.M. 




A (Ti^Ju, W^ yyMjfc 



Secretary 



Chairman 



UB fflfgBSm O F MASSACHUSOT S 

Becomaendations to the Board of Trustees 
from the Course of Study Committee, 

The following new courses have been passed by the Committee on 
Course of S£udy and are now recommended to the Board of Trustees for approvals 

Education 66 (II) PREPARATION AMD USE 0.F AUDIO-VISUAL AIDS. Study is 

made of available media of audio-visual aids to instruction, construc- 
tion of visual material, and accepted methods of use, 

2 class '-ours: 1-2 iir. laboratory period. Credit 3 

Philosophy SI (I) PHILOSOPHY OF. RELIGION. A critical and constructive 
study of the origin and nature of religion; its various forms and manifes- 
tations; its function in human life; its place as a cultural phenomenon. 
Prerequisite, Philosophy 61, 62 .or 63. 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

Losophy 82 (II). AESTHETIGS, The meaning of aesthetic experiences; 
the objective and subjective character of beauty; the origin and nature 
of the art impulse; the place of art in culture and personality, 
3 class hours. Credit 3 

Philosophy 83 (I) HEADINGS IK ANCIENT PHILOSGPHX. Special attention 
given to the works of Plato and Aristotle; the nature of their philosophy 
and its influence upon later thought. 
Prerequisite, Philosophy 61 or 62, 



•a 



class hours. Credit 3 



Philosophy &4 (II) READIHGS IN MODERN PaiLOSQPHI. Attention focused on 

the writings of Kant; the roads leading to Kant; the nature of his 

philosophy and its influence r.pon modern thought. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 61 or 62, 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

Psychology 81 (I) INDIVIDUAL INTELLIGENCE TESTING, A study and 
evaluation of Individual intelligence tests, including a discussion of 
the nature and current theories of intelligence. The laboratory periods 
are devoted to training students in the specialised techniques for adminis- 
tering and interpreting the most important of these tests. 
1 class hour; 2-2 hr. laboratory periods.- Credit 3 

Prerequisite, Psychology 26. 

Russian 51 (I), 52 (II) JSLEfflGKTAKX RUSSIAN, Grammar exercises in 

composition and conversation, selected readings. No credits in this 
cor ay be applied toward a degree until the close of the second 
semester, except upon special recommendation from the Dean. 
4- class hours. Credit 3 



;oi 



-2~ 

Animal liusbandry 54 (II) &&&% PROCESSING. (For students other than 
Animal Husbandly majors) . A few of the two-hour periods will be 
devoted to a discussion of the meat packing industry and to the preserv- 
ing and care of meat products. The remainder of the periods will be 
spent on the classification of meat animals with practice saughtezlng 
and the making of wholesale and retail cuts with stress on identification 
of retail cuts. A one-day trip through the packing plants of Boston is 
a requirement of this course and will cost about $10.00. This course 
will be given when demand is evidenced and abattoir facilities permit. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
2 2-hour laboratory periods. Credit 2 

Animal Husbandry 76 (II) AHIML BREEDING TECHNIQUES. This course deals 
with the practical application of the principles of Physiology of 
Reproduction and Election to the improvement of .Farm Animals. It inc3.udes 
practice of semen collection and evaluation, artificial insemination 
procedures and techniques and in the study of genitalia at different stages 
of estrus and gestation period in live and dead animals. Methods of 
easing and aiding parturition will be discussed and observed. 
l-2hr laboratory period. Credit 1 

Animal Husbandry 83 (1) AI)?AMCED MEAT JUDGING. This course is a eontinua- [J.; 

tion of Course 72 (Animal Husbandry) and is a continuation of meat judging. 

The team to represent the University in the Intercollegiate Meats Judging 

Contest held in connection with the International Livestock Exposition 

will be chosen from students in this course. 

Prerequisite, Animal Husbandry 72 and permission of instructor. 

1-4- hr. laboratory period first half of semester. Credit 1 

Forestry 52 (II) FORES? PHOTOGEAMMETKr. k course designed to familiarise 
the student with the use of aerial photographs in present-day forest 
man* nt practice. Map making, forest inventory and other phases of 
forest r jement involving the application of photogrammetry are considered 
in detail. Field trips for checking photographic detail on the ground .and 
inspection of photograE ic equipment will be made. Texts and equipment 
costing about $22,00 is required. 
2 class hoursj 1-4 hr. field or laboratory period. Credit 3 

Geology 31. Summer Field Course. REGIONAL GEOLOGY FIELD COURSE. 
Four weeks of intensive field study in the Big Horn Basin and the Bear- 
tooth Range of Montana, and two weeks reconnaissance of type localities 
enroute to and return from the regional area. The course will include work 
with the Brunton compass relative to mapping of rock outcrops and 
structures. Each student will prepare a comprehensive field report in 
completion of the cour3©. Enrollment restricted to eight men students of 
junior, senior or graduate status. Credit 6 

Home Economics 71 (I) RETAIL FOOD BUYIMG. This course offered jointly 
by departments of Olericulture, Animal Husbandry and Poultry Husbandry 
for all students interested in retail marketing. First 5 weeks; Vegetables and 
Fruits, Retail buying, varieties and adaptability to various uses, season of 
-liability , grades, packs and packages. Second 5 weeks: poultry and Eggs - 

dressed poultry is graded ?ji& prepared in various ways for the table and 
home freezing. Demonstrations are given of c&ndling and market classific 
©£gs. Third 5 weeks its - Deacnoiration and laboratory practice in 



a 



identification and classification of meat cuts* Sn preservation 
(freeslng sad curing) and in judging quality* 

2 class hours j l~2hr. laboratory. Credit 3 

Home Economics 85 (I) THEOSJ AMD PRACTICE OF NURSEKX SCHOOL MANAGEMENT. 
This course is planned to give students aback-ground in the history 
and philosophy of the pro-school program; theory and techniques of 
nursery school practice; children's activities in music, art, literature and 
science; fundamentals of play and use of play materials, and methods of 
observation and recording. Supervised participation in child development 
laboratory as wall as field trips to observe special groups. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 84-* 

2 class hours. 1-3 hr. laboratory. Credit 3 

Bacteriology 55 (I) F0NDAME3ST.SJLS OF SOIL MICB0BIOL0GI. This course is 
designed for students majoring in agricultural and related fields. 
Subjects included -will be: fundamental laboratory procedures and 
techniques; quantitative and qualitative microbiological analyses of 
various types of soils; studies on the carbon and nitrogen cycles as 
affected by soil miei*o-organisms. 
2-3hr. laboratory periods.. Credit 3 

Bacteriology 93 (X) 94 (II) PROBLEMS. Qualified students who have 
obtained permission from the department may arrange for independent 
wo2 s k on special problems in bacteriology. 

Credit 3 

Public Health 63 (I) INDUSTRIAL HIG.IME AMD SANITATION. A Comprehensive 
study of the practices and principles of industrial processes which may 
constitute problems in sanitation; industrial wastes, and -the health of 
the worker. Subject matter includes organisation of programs and the 
formation of policies for the inspection of sanitary and mechanical 
facilities of factories, food processing plants and other industries. 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

Mathematics 51 (I) MQDEEN SYNTHETIC GEQMETHX. An extension of the 

geometry of the triangle and the circle. The course is intended 

especially for high school teachers. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 30. 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

History 72 (II) HTSTOHT OF AMERICAS WESTWARD EXPANSION, 1763 - 1393. 

Advance of settlement from the Appalachians to the Pacific and influence 

of the frontier upon social., economic and political conditions in the 

country as a whole. 

Prerequisite, History 59. 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

History 77 (I) 7S (II) HISTORY OF SCIMCE. An introductory course fixing 

the place of science in our civilization; the growth of scientific ideas 

end the role science plays in the progressive development of society, 

It would trace tho origin and growth of the major scientific idoas of the 

past, emphasising not the technical development of each individual science, 

but science as a whole. It points out the economic, social and intellectual 

forces which, for good or ill, act upon the scientist and hence upon science 

and the influence of scientific discoveries upon men*s thinking and upon 

economic and social environment. 

2 class hours. Credit 2 



Pomology 85 (I) 86 (II) GRAIBSREI PROBLEMS. For seniors in Cranberry 
Technology. Sasctive readings and individual work to familiarize students 
with the literature, research and problems of the cranberry industry, 

2 class hours. Credit 2 

Civil Engineering 86 (II) ADVANCED SAHITAfiY. MGIKEERING* The applica- 
tion of the principles of Sanitary Engineering to design problems connected 
with water supply and sewage treatment facilities. 
1 class hour$ 2~3hr. laboratory periods. Credit 3 

Civil Engineering S3 (II) ADVANCED STHESS MALISIS. The determination 
of the stresses and strains in machines and structures under static, and 
dynamic loads. The course will cover elastic and plastic deformations, 
effect of impact or explosion, stresses in plates, thick-walled tubes 
and other two-end three-dimensional, bodies. 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

Economics S3 (I) SOCIAL COKTBDL OF EUSIKSSS. Methods of social control 

of economic activity including both formal and informal controls. 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

cs 84. (II) COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, An examination of -the 
I:--?, forms of economic organization that have been tried and proposed 
th en analysis of the economic institutions of representative current 
economics. 
3 class hours. Credit 3 

Government 71 (I) AKCIEUT &m MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THOUGHT. This course 
traces the development of political thought from the time of the Greeks 
to the end of the Middle Ages and relates it to cultural and institu- 
tional growth. 
3 class hours. Credit 3 

Government 72 (II) MODEM POLITICAL THOUGHT. This course traces the 
development of political thought from the rise of modern state to the 
present time and relates it to cultural and institutional growth. 
3 class hours. Credit 3 

* 

Wildlife Management H (II) WILDLIFE MANAGSMSHT SEMINAR. StJdy and 
discussion of problems in relation to agriculture, forestry, and the 
use and control of wildlife resources. For juniors (in 1950 only) and 
seniors in the major field, 
3 class hours, Credit 3 



Vm. L. Macbmer 
December 16, 194-9 



PROPOSED AGREEMENT OF PARTICIPATING AGENCIES REGARDING THE 
ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERaTlOS OF THE 
NEW ENGLAND FIELD TRAINING CENTER 



!• NAME OF TRAINING CENTER: 

The name of this training center shall be the Mew England Field Training 
Center. The Center shall operate under the immediate direction of the 
Head of the Department of Bacteriology and public Health at the University 
of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts. The field training aspects of 
the program shall be under the immediate supervision of the health depart- 
ments participating. 

(a) Location: 

is field training center shall be located at Amherst, Massachusetts, 
utilizing certain facilities at the University of Massachusetts, 
at the Connecticut Valley District Offices of the State Department 
of public Health, Amherst, and in cities and towns in this district 
and adjacent districts which are made available through the coopera- 
tive efforts of the St cite Department of public Health. 

(b) Staff: 

The training officer and staff assigned by the Public Health Service 
shall work under the direction of the above-named department head in 
charge of bacteriology and public health at the University of Massa- 
chusetts. They will be accountable for all Public Health Service 
properties furnished by the Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

(c) Fiscal Policies: 

Salaries of the participating staff will be borne by the participat- 
ing agencies as set forth under paragraph "7 n of this proposed agree- 
ment. 

2- GEpRAL PURPOSE OF THE TRAINING CENTER: 

To provide practical field training experience in environmental sanitation 
for all categories of public health personnel from the Mew England region, 
which includes the States of Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, 
New Hampshire , and Maesachus^ ts (public Health Service Region No. 1), and 
for students enrolled at the University of Massachusetts. 

3 . PARTICIPATING AGENCI ES : 

(a) Massachusetts State Department of Public Health, 

(b) University of Massachusetts. 

(c) Selected local health departments in Massachusetts (to be designated 

by the State Department of Public Health). 

(d) Public Health Service j 

(1) Public Health Service Regional Office No. 1, Boston, Mass. 

(2) Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Georgia. 



From time to time as field training areas in Massachusetts are evaluated 
and designated by the State Department of Public Health as suitable for 
field experience, provision may be made for other health departments in 
these areas to become participating a&encies. 

4- BEPHESEHTnKVSS Q£ JBABE£Sg&£S£ AMCIES: 

(a) Vlado A* Getting, M.D., Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of 

Public Healthy or his representative. 

(b) A representative from the Section of Environments,! Sanitation, 

designated hy the Commissioner. 

(e) Ralph a. Van Meter, Ph.D., president of the University of Massachu- 
setts, or his representative, 

(u) Leon a. Bradley, Ph.D., Head, Department of Bacteriology and Public 
Health, University of Massachusetts. 

(e) A. J. Aselmeyer, M.D., Regional Medical Director, Public Health 

Service Regional Office, Boston, Massachusetts. 

(f) £. S. Tisdale, Chief , Training Division, Communicable Disease Center, 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

5. ADVISORY BOARD t 

.An Advisory Board is established consisting of the representatives of the 
participating agencies and the senior training officer in charge of the 
training center. It shall determine the general policies concerning the 
operation of the public health training center. 

6. CHANNELS OF COMMUNICATION s 









, ,.. T | L-|,J[ -*J II. I. 



(a) Correspondence to be cleared through the Training Division, Communi- 
cable Disease Centers 

(1) Administration 

(2) Program planning 

(b) Correspondence to be cleared through the Regional Public Health Serv- 
ice Office, Region Mo. 1: 

(1) State relations 
(k.) Recruitment 

(c) All correspondence pertaining to the operation of the training center 
will be between the senior training officer in charge of the training 
center and the Training Division, Communicable Disease Center, with 
carbon copies to representatives of the participating agencies. 

7. FINANCIAL PARTICIPATION* 
(a) public Health Service: 

(1) Salaries of the following staff: Training center staff, 
full time, consisting of one or more qualified sanitary 
engineers or sanitarians with clerical assistance. 



-3- 

(2) Field equipment and supplies. 

(3) k minimum of two automobiles, including operational and mainten- 
ance costs for staff and trainees. 

(b) University of Massachusetts » 

(1) Necessary offices, demonstration and class rooms at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts j for conducting field training activities. 

(d) Rent, heat , and electricity for training center quarters. 

(3) Salaries of part-time consultants as described below in section 

a (b). 

(c) State Department of Public Health* 

(1) Salaries of part-time consultants as described below in section 
8 (c). 

(2) Additional automotive equipment necessary for transportation 
during field trips. 

*• PARTICIPATIO N IN STAFF ACTIVITIES t 

(a) Public Health Service* 

(1) One sanitary engineer to act as senior training officer. 
(£) On© junior sanitarian. 

(3) One clerk-stenographer. 

(b) University of Massachusetts % 

(1) Staff members of the University of Massachusetts will be avail- 
able for consultative services in connection with field training. 

(c) Stat© Department of Healths 

(1) Menbers of State and local health departments to participate in 
training as designated by Commissioner in areas agreed upon by 
the Advisory Board. 

9- RESPONSIBILITY FOR RECBMRMk 

(a) Public Health Service Regional Office 8o« 1, Boston, Massachusetts 

will be responsible for recruiting of all trainees from States 
in Region 1' other than Massachusetts. 

(b) Massachusetts Department of Public Health will be responsible for 

recruiting trainees from Massachusetts. 

(c) The number of trainees to be recruited from Massachusetts and the 

other states shall be decided fcy the Advisory Board. 



General eligibility requirements for enrolment shall be agreed upon 
by the Advisory Board. Admission to courses shall be cleared through 
the appropriate admission officers of the University of Massachusetts. 

11. DECISIONS PEIlTAiraG TOi 

(a) General policy 

(b) personnel 

(c) Finance 

(d) progrejE planning 

vill be arrived at by the Advisory Board, 

12. This agreement may b© revised or terminated at any tis.® ty mutual 
agreement or at the end of any fiscal year provided three months notice 
on the part of either the Public Health Service, the Massachusetts De- 
partment of Public Health, or the University of Massachusetts has been 



Vlado A. Getting, dSTssionSF" 

State Department of Public Health 






Ralph .4. Van Meter, president 
University of Massachusetts 



A. J. Aselmeysr, Kegional Medical Director 
Public Health Service Region Ho. 1 
Boston, Massachusetts 



E. S. Tisdale, Chief 
Training Division 
Communicable Disease Center 

Atlanta, Georgia 



October, 1949 



1587 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINOTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 12, 1950, 12:30 P.M., Butterfield Dormitory, Amherst 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Chandler, Deely, 
Cashin, Hubbard, Brett, Taber, Orton, 
Brown, Whitmore, Mrs. Leach, 
Mrs. McNamara, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Havley, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett called on members of the Trustee 
Committee on Tuition to report their findings. Trustee Deely said 
that he felt that a tuition rate of $100 established in 1933 was 
not realistic today. Further, a flat tuition rate, regardless of 
the amount, puts education on the basis of ability to pay rather 
than intellectual ability. He felt that an increase in tuition 
coupled with scholarship assistance would allow variation in the 
tuition rate to meet the needs of different students. 

Trustee Hubbard said that in his opinion it is the 
obligation of the Commonwealth to finance higher education on the 
same basis as secondary education. Genius is not coordinated with 
income. Society should see to it that the men and women who will 
serve the next generation should have education in accordance with 
their ability to learn. He said that it is not within the power 
of the Board of Trustees to set up scholarship funds from extra 
tuition income. Further, no Legislature can bind the next Legis- 
lature and so there would be no guarantee that any scholarship 
funds which mi^rht be established would be continued. 



Tuition 



1588 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Brown said that a State University should have 
a different philosophy from that of a private university. Any 
tuition increase makes it more difficult for students from low in- 
come families to attend. He said he had given much weight in his 
thinking to the expressed wishes of the Legislature, the Alumni, 
and the students. 

Trustee Taber said that in principle he had agreed with 
Trustee Deely that if $100 tuition was right in 1933, it was not 
right today. However, in the meantime there has been a trend 
toward free education on the theory that education is a responsi- 
bility of all the people and is an investment in the future rather 
than an expense. Education should be made more easily available. 
Further, Mr. Taber said that he could not agree with the idea of 
raising the tuition on some students so that they would in effect 
finance the education of other students. 

Trustee Whitmore said that when he was a student at the 
University there was no tuition. Some states still have no tuition 
at the state university. Money spent for education is the best 
money that a state spends. Financial income is not the best 
answer to meeting an educational problem. 

Chairman Bartlett said that an increase in tuition at 
the State University at this time would tend to stop the trend 
toward placing higher education within the reach of all who can 
benefit from it. He said it would be a serious mistake to step 
backward and raise the tuition at a tine when the State should be 
spending more money for its University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To accept the recommendation of the Special 

Trustee Committee on Tuition that the tuition 
not be increased and that the committee be 
discharged. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the Boarding Hall is in 
good financial condition, with a revenue at the end of April of 
$4.1,900 in excess of expenses. He reported on the action of the 
Trustee Executive Committee authorizing continuation of the Board- 
ing Hall operations on the present basis. After discussion, it 
was unanimously 

VOTED : To accept the recommendation of the Executive 
Committee that the Boarding Hall continue to 
operate on the present basis. 

Trustee Brett outlined the proposed Alumni Association 
Foundation. He said that this Foundation should be able to obtain 
more contributions from private donors than have been granted to 
the University in the past. In fact, very little has been given 
to the University to date. 

Under the proposed articles of incorporation, there would 
be set up a non-profit corporation of eleven members - six repre- 
senting Alumni and the other five being the Chairman of the Board 
of Trustees, two other Trustees and the President of the University 
and the Treasurer of the University. This corporation would solicit 
gifts and bequests to be used for the general benefit of the 
University. Several other states have similar corporations. 

Trustee Brett read correspondence between him and 
Commissioner Desmond discussing the question which Commissioner 
Desmond raised at the annual meeting; namely, the possible conflict 



fSSf 



C 



Bo« rding 
Hall 



Alumni 

Association 

Foundation 









1590 



TRUSTEE 



District Gage 
Laboratory- 



School of 
Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of authority between the Foundation and the Board of Trustees. 

Several suggestions were offered by different members 
of the Board: 

1. That the Trustee representatives should be named 
by the Board. 

2. That gifts should be received by the Foundation 
only after approval of the Board. 

3. That the expenditures in support of the University 
should be approved by the Trustees. 

4.. That there be provision for acceptance of funds 
by the Foundation for the benefit of the Alumni 
Association itself. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To refer the question of the Alumni Associa- 
tion Foundation to the Executive Committee 
of the Trustees with power. 

It was further 

VOTED: That the Trustees are in agreement with the 
general principle and purposes of the pro- 
posed Alumni Association Foundation. 

President Van Meter reported that he had just received 

copies of a proposed contract with the War Department for establish 

ment of a District Gage Laboratory at the University. The Trustee 

Executive Committee recently approved establishment of the 

laboratory subject to final approval of the terms of the contract. 

In view of the lateness of the hour, it was 

VOTED: To refer the contract to the Executive 
Committee with power. 

Trustee Vhitmore presented recommendations from the 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds. After discussion, it was 

unanimously 



EE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To accept the Home Economics Building as of 
October 15, 194$; the Physics Laboratory as 
of September 19, 19-49 subject to final com- 
pletion of some minor items as listed by the 
architect; the Waltham Field Station Build- 
ing as of March 9, 1950 subject to completion 
of a few minor items as listed by the architect; 
the Brooks, Hamlin and Knowlton dormitories as 
of September 15, 194-9 subject to completion of 
a few minor items as listed by the University 
Superintendent of Buildings. 

The dormitories were accepted on lease from the Alumni 

Building Corporation. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED : To authorize construction by the Alumni Build- 
ing Corporation of housing accommodations for 
approximately 350 men students either in one 
large building or two smaller buildings. 

It was 

VOT ED: To authorize the Trustee Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds to decide the type of construction 
and the site of construction. 

It was 

VOTE D: Not to grant further options for the present on 
lots in the Louisa M. Baker tract. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED : To authorize the administration to demolish all 
temporary wooden buildings in Commonwealth 
Circle with the exception of T barracks which 
will be used for the present as a Housing Office. 

It was 

VOTE D: To authorize the University administration to 
grant a right of way across the property 
occupied by the Chief Engineer, this right of 
way to be granted to the Town of Amherst for 
purposes of sidewalk construction. 

There was discussion of a proposed Supplementary Budget 

of the University which was recently approved by the Executive 

Committee in the amount of $291,770. 



Home Economics 
Building 

Physics 
Laboratory 

Waltham Field 
Station 

Dormitories 



Dormitories 



Option on 

Land 



Commonweal th 
Circle 



Sidewalks 



Supplementary 
Budget 









1592 



TRUSTEE 



Departments of 
Philosophy and 
Sociology 



Engineering 

Research 

Institute 



University 

Extension 

Program 



Arthur B. 

Beaumont, Emeritujs 
Professor 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion as to whether separate departments 

of Philosophy and Sociology should be established, and it was 

VOTED: To refer this matter to the Trustee Committee 
on Faculty and Program of Study. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED ; To authorize the establishment of an Engineer- 
ing Research Institute. The purpose of this 
Institute would be to contract with private 
concerns, government agencies and others for 
engineering research. 

Secretary Burke reported briefly on the demand from 

various parts of the State for University Extension programs in 

fields other than Agriculture and Home Economics. He described 

the program being conducted by the State Department of Education 

with the cooperation of Amherst College and University of 

Massachusetts instructors at Vestover Field. He reported that the 

University now has requests from 67 persons in Pittsfield for 

University Extension programs. These requests are endorsed by the 

Pittsfield School Department and by the General Electric Corporation,, 

most of the applicants being employees of the General Electric. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the University to proceed with 
University Extension courses at Pittsfield 
and the administration was requested to 
discuss this matter with the State Depart- 
ment of Education before beginning its pro- 
gram. 



It was 

VOTED: To elect Arthur B. Beaumont as Emeritus 
Professor of Agronomy. 



1593 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. Leach, Chairman of the Trustee Committee on Exten- 
sion reported on the meeting of her committee on Friday, May 12, 
at 11 o'clock in Director Munson' s office. She said that all 
members of the committee were present and that the meeting proved 
to be most vorth while as a means of keeping informed on progress 
in this field. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5 o'clock. 




Secretary 



n^y^^j^cW^CTT 



Chair-man 






1594 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DONALD HAVLEY 
resolution 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 3, 1950, 10:30 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 

PRESENT ; Trustees Whitinore, Haigis, Taber, Deely, Brown, 
Desmond, Mrs. Leach, Mrs. McNamara, president 
Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 

In the absence of Chairman Bartlett, it was 

VOTED ; To elect Trustee Vhitmore as Chairman pro tern. 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and minutes 
of the last meeting. 

Upon the recommendation of the president and of the faculty 
of the University, it was 

VOTED : To award the following degrees to those candidates 
as listed on the Commencement program: 

of Science 

of Arts 

of Business Administration 

of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

of Science in Chemical Engineering 

of Science in Civil Engineering 

of Science in Electrical Engineering 

of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

of Vocational Agriculture 

of Landscape Architecture 



Upon the recommendation of the president and of the faculty 
of the Graduate School, it was 

VOTED : To award the following degrees to those candidates 
as listed on the Commencement program: 

106 Master of Science 
11 Doctor of philosophy 

The Trustees requested the administration to prepare 

appropriate resolutions expressing their feeling of profound loss 

through the death of Hugh P. Baker, president from 1933 to 1947, 

and Donald P. Kawley, Manager of the University Store from 1933 to 

1950 - these resolutions to be presented at the next Board meeting. 



450 


Bachelor 


280 


Bachelor 


139 


Bachelor 


3 


Bachelor 


8 


Bachelor 


53 


Bachelor 


66 


Bachelor 


121 


Bachelor 


3 


Bachelor 


6 


Bachelor 


1129 


- total 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 
VOTED: To meet on Wednesday, June 28 at 11:00 A.M. at the 



UNIVERSITY OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 



C ommencement 
1950 



1863 - Eighty-seventh Year - 1950 



'-ear 



. 



1595 



Next 

Meeting 



Addition to 
• b egislative 
Committee 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Jup« i loco in. in a m PrasiHpnt.t.c; Ciffir.f*. £mhpr&t 



P' 



Vf 



of the 



V( 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DONALD HAWLEY 
resolution 



of the 

V 



approp 
throug 
and Dc 

1950 - 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 
VOTED: To meet on Wednesday, June 28 at 11:00 A.M. at the 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



Eightieth 
Commencement 



LIBRARY LAWN 

(In case of rain the exercises will be held in the Curry S. Hicks 
Physical Education Building) 

Sunday, June 4, 1950, at 3 :00 P. M. 



ear 



95 



Next 
Meeting 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



- - 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Jun* 1. IQ^O. IQ.^50 A.M.. President's Office. Amherst 



of thf 



\ 



of th< 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DONALD HAVLEY 
resolution 



appro} 
throu^ 
and Dc 

1950 - 



Program 



& 



PROCESSIONAL 



INVOCATION 

Rabbi Louis Ruchames 
Hillel Foundation 



ADDRESS 

Edward Weeks, Litt. D. 
Editor of Atlantic Monthly 



ADDRESS 

His Excellency Paul A. Dever, LL.D. 
Governor of the Commonwealth 



CONFERRING OF DEGREES 

President Ralph A. Van Meter, Ph.D. 

RECESSIONAL 

Organist: Doric Alviani, Assistant Professor of Music 



& 



(The audience is requested to remain standing 
while the academic procession withdraws.) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



VOTED: To meet on Wednesday, June 28 at 11:00 A.M. at the 



ear 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Summa Cum Laude 



Theodore Delevoryas 
Guy Arthur Franceschini 



Stuart Richard Gunn 
James P. Toomey 



Magna Cum Laude 



William Dean Athearn 
Horace Huntingdon Brown. Jr. 
Elizabeth Pauline Burr 
Barbara Lucy Freeman 
Theodore Joseph Goodman 
John William Grenier 
George Eugene Maurice 



Burton Richard Anderson 
Eleanor Carr Burt 
Edwin Brainard Caswell 
Estelle Rose Chase 
Peter Joseph Drevinsky 
Hyman Saul Edelstein 
Tracy Ivan Flagg 
Ann Lackens Guba 
Margot Fraser Hakes 
Donald Edward Hattin 
John Thomas Katsanos 
John Merriam Kingsbury 
Howard Byron Lovering 



Shirley Marie Adams 
Daniel George Alex 
Alexander Allan Alexander 
Donald Macomber Allen 
Peter Francis Anastasia 
Lorene Smith Andersen 
Clinton Edward Anderson 
David Eugene Anderson 
Donald Lindsay Anderson 
Fred Anderson, Jr. 
Leonard Eugene Anderson 
Mary Catherine Armato 



Homer Blaine Miller, Jr. 
Eugene Charles Putala 
Robert Ervin Putnam 
Emmanuel Mann Roth 
Edna Elizabeth Steinbeck 
*Alan Nelson Young 



Cum Laude 



Dominic Alexander Marini 
John Vincent Moreau 
Gordon James Muise 
John Anthony O'Connor 
Frank Quimby Orrall 
Paul Pincus 
John Albert Rikert 
William Smith Ryder, Jr. 
Judith Stoyle 
Arden Claire Sullivan 
Warwick Manson Tinsley, Jr. 
Irving Wasserman 



Next 
Meeting 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



Rite 



Marshall Frederick Aronson 
Jaspard Harvey Atkins 
Vitie Charles Atkocius 
Richard Pierce Babbitt 
Harry Lawrence Bain 
Kevin Joseph Barlow 
Russell Tuller Barnes 
Roger Thomas Barron 
Barbara Arey Bartlett 
George Elian Battit 
Edward Stone Beal 
Robert Alvin Bennett 






1594 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

-5 -ir*crv lrv-Ctn /. \a D-r.^cn Aa-n+ 1 c. H-P-P-i r»o tmViPr.t.t. 



Degrees 



of ti 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DONALD HAVLEY 
resolution 



of t 



appr 
thrc 
and 

195' 



William Joseph Bennett 

David Adams Benson 
*Jason Stuart Berger 

Joseph Merton Bernard 

Paul Emile Bernardin 

Roland George Bernier 

Lawrence Melvin Bernstein 

Marion Moody Berry 

William Francis Berry 

Howard Alan Biegel 

James Leonard Billings 

Philip James Blanchard, Jr. 

Donald Woodburn Bliss 

Warren Spaulding Blodget 

Rosalind Barbara Bonazzoli 

Chester Alexander Bonnallie, Jr. 
*Francis William Botsch 

Zane Audbrey Bower 

John Farley Boyle 

George William Boylen, Jr. 

Robert Ambrose Brennan 

Howard Everett Brewer 

John Albert Brickett 
*Carlton Allen Bricknell 

David Emerson Brooks 

William Albert Bross 

Albert Frederick Brown 

Thomas Orlando Brown 

Sydney Brunell 

Allan Chandler Buck 

Ruth Marie Buck 

Robert Bulcock 

Paul Philip Burbutis 

Priscilla Eunice Burnett 

Robert Louis Burns 

Richard Henry Burt 

Hervey Harold Butler 

Stephen Frank Caci 

Edward Camara 

Raymond Alcide Caouette 

Nicholas Andrew Carbaliotis 

Doris Catherine Carbone 

Ralph Noble Carew 

Alan Ervin Carlson 

Allan Cameron Carpenter 

Charles William Carr 

Francis Xavier Carr 

James Mills Cassidy 

Arthur Oreste Castraberti 

Ardith Muriel Cattermole 

Patricia Ann Chadwick 



Elmer Albert Chamberlain 
Emerson Hiltz Chandler 
Paul Eugene Channell 
Edward Joseph Chapski 
Stanley Ely Charm 
Ernest Carlton Charron 
Harry Chiklakis 
Gratia Ruth Clancy 
John Burleigh Clapp, Jr. 
Michael Joseph Clifford 
Louie Arthur Clough 
Joseph Collingwood, Jr. 
Eugene Francis Congdon 
Walter Paul Conrardy 
James Patterson Cormack, Jr. 
Raymond Manford Cornish, Jr. 
Bernard Calvin Cossar 
Mary Louise Cote 
Lawrence Henry Couture 
John Caldwell Cowles 
Henry Lytle Crawshaw 
William G. Creed 
Hobart N. Crocker, Jr. 
Eleanor Crowell 
Raymond Alan Currier 
Spencer Lappen Davis 
Douglas Dean 
William Deane, Jr. 
Ara Demur jian 
Richard Edmund Desjarlais 
Mary Lucille Dickman 
Oscar Clarence Doane, Jr. 
Paul Taylor Doherty 
Alden Cushing Doliber 
Barbara Anne Donahue 
Russell Stephen Drago 
John Howard DuBois 
Valmore A. Dubreuil 
John Seymour Egan 
Raymond Herman Eger 
David Crocker Eldridge 
Erwin Marcellus Eldridge 
John George Ellis 
Endre Endresen, Jr. 
Theodore Stevenson Eschholz 
Arnold John Estelle 
William Thomas Evans 
Donald Francis Fair 
Nancy Farnsworth 
Harold Fienman 
William Arthur Fitzpatrick 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



Francis Constant Florini 
Paul Michael Foley 
Douglas Bernard Footit 
Robert W. Fox 
John Joseph Freeman 
Robert George Freeman 
Stanley Henry Frodyma 
Brewster Weston Fuller 
Wallace Russell Fulton 
Edward Kramer Funkhouser, Jr. 
Leonard Henry Gaffen 
Michael C. Gaffney 
Walter Austin Gaines 
Alfred Peter Galasso 
*William Andrew Gallamore 
Dexter DeWitt Galusha 
Robert Verrill Ganley 
Marcia Janet Gardner 
Richard Emerson Gaylord 
Henrique Alexander Gerardo 
Charles Joseph Gerry, Jr. 
Robert Tuttle Gildersleeve 
Frances Josephine Gillotti 
Dorothy Lois Gilman 
Philip Sexton Gilmore, Jr. 
Rose Sarah Goodman 
Walter Phillip Gould 
John Howard Graham 
Leo Roger Gray 
Kivi Kenneth Grebber 
Paul William Greenburg 
Arthur Charles Grenier 
Gedemen Joseph Gribouski 
Frank Grice 
Raymond A. Haddad 
Robert Morton Haft' 
Joseph Norman Haffty 
Charles William Haines, Jr. 
*Harold Francis Hall 
Anne Alice Harrington 
Franklyn Sherwood Harris 
Harry Deane Hartwell 
John Emil Hauschild, Jr. 
David Lowell Hayden 
Lloyd Norton Hayward 
Carol Jean Heady 
Robert Graham Hebb 
James Francis Herlihy 



jar 



zJ U 



Next 
Meeting 



Frank Selden Hersom 
James Andrew Higgins 
William Barton Hill 
Bruce Carter Hobson 
Ralph Richard Hockridgc 
Herbert John Holden 
Arthur James Holmes 
Robert Kimball Huckins 
Richard Lawrence Humphrey 
David Croxton Hunter 
Grace Mary Hyder 
Daniel Issenberg 
Trueman Carl Jackson 
Theodore Jenkins 
George Benson Johnson 
Norman Earl Johnson 
Evan Vincent Johnston 
Robert Alston Jones 
Wallace A. Jones 
Warren Stanley Jones 
Nicholas Vaios Karas 
Sumner Kaufman 
Nancy Elizabeth Kendall 
Allen Henry Keough 
Allah-Gholi Khazai 
Barbara Anne Kinghorn 
Everett Adam Kosarick 
Robert Leo Kuhn 
Harold Carleton Lacaillade, Jr. 
Harlan Bolles Ladd 
*John Franklin Ladd 
Frederick James Laird 
Francis Edward Lajoie 
Stanley Warren Lake 
Philip Miner Lamoreaux 
Robert John Landry 
John Perry Lane 
Francis Richard LeBlanc 
Louise Marie LeClair 
Harry Gustave Lehnert, Jr. 
Philip Elias Lewis 
Reginald Frank Lifka 
Joseph Lit 
Thelma Ruth Litsky 
William Paul Looney 
Curtis Linwood Lopes 
Glenn Paul Lynch 
George Butterick MacCollom 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



of t 



Degrees 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DOKALD HAWLEY 
resolution 



of 



app 
thi 
and 

195 



Kenneth Gordon MacDonald 

Joseph Francis Mach 

William Donald MacKay 

James Edward MacMonegle, Jr. 

Bradford Stevens MacNulty 

Ann MacVicar 

Anthony John Manganaro 

John Manlich, Jr. 

John Francis Manning 

John Lewis Mansfield 

Ralph Perkins Marble, Jr. 

John Aloysius Martin, Jr. 

Leslie Joseph Martin 

Mason Edwin Marvel 

Joseph Donald Mascis 

Eugene F. Mason 

William Edward Mathews, Jr. 

David Lawrence May 

Everett Louis Maynard 

John Phillip Mayo 

Thomas Francis McAvoy, Jr. 

Francis Patrick McCarthy 

Robert Francis McCarthy 

Robert Wesley McEachern 

Dorothy Mcintosh 

Harvey James McKinney 

Joan Sheila McLaughlin 

John Patrick McLaughlin 

John Joseph McManus 

Thomas Allen McRoberts 

William Edward McTigue 

Grace Elizabeth Merrill 

Benn Howard Merritt 

Louis Franklin Michelson 

Robert Moore Midgley 

Richard Morton Milan 

Robert Luckey Miller 

Ralph Gerald Mitchell 

Bertha Alice Monroe 

Walter John Montgomery 

Donald Moore 

Morton Edwin Morin 

Walter R. Morin 

Daniel Kenneth Morrison, Jr. 

Alfred Raymond Morse, Jr. 

Christopher George Moustakis 

Arthur Allen Muka 

Harold Edward Myers 

Michael Domcnic Nardi 



Joseph Vito Natale 
Arthur Eliot Newell 
Nestor Nicholeris 
Charles Emerson Nichols 
Richard Gorham Nickerson 
Carl Wilfred Nyberg 
William James O'Brien 
Robert Francis O'Connell 
George Edmund Oldmixon 
Yvonne Brenda Oliver 
John Edward O'Neil 
Edwin Joseph Orlowski 
Patricia Ann O'Rourke 
Ralph Bartlett Osgood, Jr. 
Frank J. Padykula 
Clarence W. Parker 
Richard Bradford Parks 
Robert Michael Pasini 
Shirley Evelyn Patterson 
Leon Earl Dwight Pease, Jr. 
Edward Ludwig Perednia 
Ann Glover Peterson 
Rosemary Giordano Peterson 
Paul Robert Phalon 
Robert Paul Phaneuf 
Edward Robert Pierce 
Frederick Grover Pierce 

*Richard Hurst Pierce 
Robert Gardner Pierce 
Earl Nelson Pilgrim 
Thomas Francis Pitoniak 
Donald John Poitras 
Harriet Elizabeth Poor 
Allen Norman Porter 
William Edward Powell 
Gerald Pributsky 
Donald Robert Progulske 
Sheldon Morton Promisel 
Anne Valerie Provencher 
Henry Albert Prunier 
Earl S. Quance 
Daniel Francis Quealy 
Earl Quint 
Marvin W. Ray, Jr. 
Raymond Arlington Reed 
Edwin Arthur ReHill 

^Lawrence Jason Reines 
Herbert Edward Ripley 
David Walker Roberts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



Edith Delores Roberts 
William Charles Robinson 
Dorothy Beers Rodriguez 
John Patrick Rogers 
Franklin Drisco Rollins 
Aaron Rosenfield 
Robert A. Rotan, Jr. 
Joseph Gideon Roy, II 
John Joseph Rypysc 
Jean Claudio Santoro 
William Arthur Saverse 
Louis Edwin Scheller 
Abraham Schlein 
Marvin Mandel Schreiber 
Elliot Schreider 

*Everett Dean Schubert 
Robert Martin Scolnick 
James Alexander Scott, Jr. 
Edward Hartley Seadale 
Arthur Elbert Selig 
Paul Serex 
June Patricia Simons 
Donald Everett Sisson 
Elizabeth Jane Skahill 
Elinor Jean Sleeper 
Barbara Ruth Smith 

*Howard Bruce Smith, Jr. 
John Calvin Smith 
Paul Sherman Smith 

*Robert Kingston Smith 
Zilpha Fasser Smith 
Russell Elliot Snow 
Loretta Rose Souliere 
Clifton Edmund Sowerby, Jr. 
Charles Edward Staniunas 
Richard Baldwin Stein 
Alphonse Strachocki 
Miriam Marston Stump 
William Duggan Sweeney 
James Herbert Swensen 

*Lawrence Kent Swift 
June Flora Swindell 
Theodore Raymond Sylvia 
Edward Rudolph Taddeo 
William Henry Tague, Jr. 



*As of the Class of 1949. 



year 
:e 



John Hoag Talmage 
Dominic Thomas Taurone 
William Gordon Taylor 
Donald Andrew Thibeault 
Dale Stephen Thomas 
Robert Irving Thomas 
Chester Baylies Thompson 
*Harry Wallis Thorne 
Albert Henry Toczydlowski 
Leonard Albert Todd 
Jeannette Marian Tonner 
Betty Anne Traynor 
Frank Elmer Truesdale 
Thomas Alexander Turner 
Leonard James Van Vorse 



3 



Next 
Meeting 







cjlf*~-f^*{/ 



Marius Plato Vavoudes '?))e^ji~j*- P- TOS-S- 

Francis John Vigneau 

Nancy Marie Wallace 

Wallace Waloweek 

Thomas Caroli Walz 

Ruth Dimock Wandrei 

Arthur Calvin Ward 

Barbara Elinor Washburn 
*Corinne Mary Waters 

Nathan Weinstein 

S. Edward Weinswig 
*Paulina Fay Wells 

James Edgar West 

Donald Elvin Westcott 

Hope Goff Westcott 

Joan Bangs Westcott 
*Edward Leland White 

Earle Dixon Whitney 

Paul Roy Wilbur 

John Joseph Winton 

Edward Wiseblood 

Francis Joseph Wisnoski 

Frank John Wojcik 

Barbara Ann Wood 

Abraham S. Yaloff 

Isidore Omer Yergeau 

George Clement Youland 

Warren Irving Young 

Melvin Louis Zabar 
''George Joseph Zebrowski 
''Boleslaw Eulogouse Zmaczynski 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Degrees 



of t 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DOKALD HAWLEY 
resolution 



of . 



app 
thi 
and 

195 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Bruce Tucker Bowens 



Charles Richard Carswell 
*Leonard Joseph Drohan 
Diana Louise Gallotta 
Faye Hammel 
Burton Jay Kolovson 



John Vincent Abidian 
Rachel Louise Blouin 

^Lawrence Joseph Brayman 
Francis Donald Brogan 
John Francis Byrne 
Arreta Irene Edmonds 
Joseph Day Emerson 

*Irving Noble Kelsey 
Anthony Lawrence 



Edward Aaronian 
I. Melvin Abrahamson 
William Horace Adams, III 
John Robert Addison 
Theodore William Bruce Albert 
Leo J. Alessandrini 
Bertram Ward Allen 
Francis Xavier Anderson 
Frederick Nathaniel Anderson 
Myron Lawrence Atlas 
Francis William Bacon, Jr. 
Ralph Leigh Bailey 
Arthur Cory Bardwell 
Richard F. Barkley 
Richard John Barry 
Robert Maurice Beaulieu 
Irving Berg 

Norman Harrison Berkowitz 
George Joseph Bernard 
Richard Albert Blanchard 



Summa Cum Laude 

Paul Adelard Gagnon 

Magna Cum Laude 

William Vincent Luti 
*Robert Joseph Meyer 
Paul Arthur Perry 
Robert William Tighe 



Cum Laude 



Rite 



Richard John Miller 
Mary Claire Morano 
h George Alfred Peters, Jr. 
Clarence W. Peterson, Jr. 
Robert James Tisdell 
Anita Marie Torres 
Thomas Edmund Wilber 
Agnes Frances Wilczynski 
Earl Winer 



Henry George Boucher, Jr. 

Bernard William Bourdeau 

William Stratton Bradley 

Irene Bresnick 

Thomas Jefferson Brewer 

Sidney S. Bronstein 
*Albert Brown 

Pasquale Anthony Bruni 

William Burns 

Eugene Martin Byrne 
*Roland Arthur Campbell 

James Michael Caramello 

Alexis Adelbert Caron 

Paul Donahue Caron 

James Arthur Carr 

Morris David Cave 

Thomas Dwight Chaffee 

Jack Chinian 

Stanley Philip Chiz 

Thaddeus John Ciesluk 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



Jo-Anne Clark 
Eliot Kenneth Cohen 
Phyllis Lillian Cole 
*Paul Joseph Conlon 
Robert George Cook 
Byron Anastasious Coparanis 
George Cruft Corey 
Webster Eliot Cotton 
Walter John Cox 
Jacqueline Crosby 
Philip Martin Cullin 

*Homer Madison Culver 
Richard Milford Cunningham 
William James Cunningham 
Brabara Adell Curran 
James Patrick Curtin 
Daniel Richard Daly 

*John Usher Damon 
Newton Stanley Davidow 
Samuel Matheson Deamon 
Raymond Joseph Demeo 
Janice Amanda Dillard 

"Richard Taylor Dolan 
Mariellen Donoghue 
Everett George Downing 
George Henry Doyle 

*Henry Frederick Drewniany 
Jack LeRoy DuMond 
William Gerard Dunn 
Robert Donald Eddy 
Solomon Feinberg 
Courtland Field 
Henry Joseph Filar 
Betty Louise Fischer 
William Joseph Fitzgerald 
Gardner Bruce Fletcher 
Kenneth Stancliffe Ford 
Joseph Peter Fraser 
Restitute Treille Fresto 
Donald William Friedman 
Frank Anthony Frontiera 
David Gerard Gabrielson 
Robert Myles Gardner 

John Gilboard 
Lillian Jane Gill 
George Leo Gilligan 
Elliot Glassman 
Howard Goldberg 

James Donald Gracey 
Donald Benjamin Grainger 
Harold Davidson Grant, Jr. 



Arnold Jack Green 
H. Richard Green 
Winthrop Jeremiah Green 
Bernard Irving Grosser 
^Joseph Gruber 
Anne Theresa Guiheen 
Michael Hadala 
John Henry Hager 
Philip G. Hanson 
Cornelius D. Harrington, Jr. 
Phyllis Whitcomb Hartwell 
Kenneth Anthony Harubin 
Elmer Wells Butler Hassett 
Jack Bert Herson 
Joseph Raymond Hilyard, Jr. 
Peter Humphry 
Richard Theodore Jackson 
Adolph John Jakobek 
Arthur Burdette Jerome 
Robert William Joyce 
Edward Stephen Kanozak 
David Jack Katz 
John Frederick Klaiber 
Bertram William Kline 
Richard Grant Knowland, Jr. 
Christy James Kollinites 
Walter Benjamin Kozloski 
Elizabeth Anne Kreiger 
Lionel Joseph LaBarge 
Morton Roy Laby 
Normand Roland Laporte 
Barbara Joan Lawrence 
Henry William Lawrence 
Henry Warren Leander, Jr. 
Francis John Leary 
Eleanor Lee 

^Charles Henry L'Esperance 
Laura Levine 
William Lieberwirth 
Leonard S. London 
Bruce Homer Lucier 
Daniel Nicholas Macero 
Douglas Clifford MacKenzie 
George Macricosta 
William Francis Magner 

+ Melvin Ralph Mailloux 
Walter Peter Maisner 
William Aloysius Malone, Jr. 
Joseph William Maloney 
Richard Edward Maloney 
Ralph Edward Marsden, Jr. 



year 
se 



e 



159- 



Next 

Meeting 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DOEALD HAWLE 
resolution 







UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 






MINUTES 
1 ' ' 


OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF 


BOARD OF TRUSTEES 




EE 












Louise Florence Martin 


Gabriel Pustel 








Julian Terwilliger Martindale 


Cheryl Race 








Frank Robert Matarese 


Leon B. Ranger, Jr. 








Stephen Mateik 


Edwin A. Rautio 








Floyd Robert Maynard 


John Joseph Reardon, Jr. 








James Patrick McCarthy 


Irwin Thomas Reed 








Thomas Alfred McCarthy 


Roland James Reidy 








James Kendel McDonald 


George Joseph Renda 








*Regina Mary McDonough 


Kenneth Newhall Roberts 








Ann McElroy 


Donald Sumner Robinson 








Martin Joseph McGrath, Jr. 


Charles William Rogers 






of t 


David Harris Meltzer 


Charles Harry Rollins 






Robert Calvin Messer 


*Patrick Henry Rooney, Jr. 








Janet Elizabeth Miller 


George Everett Rose 








Clifton Russell Milne 


Donald Joseph Roy 








Helen Mae Mitchell 


Lois Rubin 








Roger John Morell 


Edward George Safer 








Francis Joseph Moriarty 


Gerald Francis Scanlon 








Joseph Paul Moriarty 


Sumner Sharff 








*Enid Shryer Morin 


John William Shea 








William Bernard Mullins 


*Thomas Henry Shea 








Walter Francis Nally, Jr. 


*Bruce Whitman Shufelt, Jr. 








Bertrand Francisco Narbis, Jr. 


Joan Nancy Silverman 








Edward Naroian 


Geremias Furtado Simas 








Edward Johnson Newby 


Bernard Melvin Slavin 








John Robert Newman 


Edwin Anthony Slowinski 








Norman Nolan Newman 


David James Smith 








John Peter Nionakis 


Everett John Smith 








Giovanni Homer Nobile, Jr. 


Stanley Lyman Smith 








Robert Norwood 


Fred Calvin Spracklin 








Joseph Daniel O'Connell 


Lewis Lambert Stead 






of 1 


Walter Edward O'Connell 
Leonard Albert O'Connor 
Frances Irene O'Keefe 


Joseph Thomas Steede 
John Steele, Jr. 
Elbert Abraham Taitz 






/ 


Jay Barton Oker 
John Aaron Oliver 
*Justin Leo O'Malley 
Alan Charles Ornsteen 
Mary Margaret O'Rourke 
Raymond Dominique Ouellette 
John Robert Paulsen 
Henry Brown Peirce, Jr. 


*Irving Taylor 
Joseph Rene Thibeault 
John Thomas 
Thomas Degnan Toohey 

* Maurice I. Tretakofif 
Herbert Joseph Turin 
Stanley Til ford Udelson 
Jacquelyn Ruth VanBlarcom 






app 


Therese Anne Pender 


Harry James Velander 




V 


Jean Zelman Perkins 


Abigail Vest 




I 


thi 


Russell Gedney Perkins 


Robert Edward Vigneau 






Robert Louis Peters 


Nicholas Vrachos 








Charles Francis Plumer 


*John D. Walker 






and 


Lael Hunt Powers 
Patricia Anne Powers 


James William Wall 
Mildred Edna Warner 






195 









UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



year 
ce 



Next 

Meeting 



Stanley Fred Wasserman 

Robert George Watson 

Mary Whitman Wells 

Joseph James Westwater 

Wilcox Langbridge Whitcombe, Jr. 

William Walter Winn 



*Norman Alfred Winston 

*Charles B. Woods 
Gordon Pember Wrenn 
Jerome Ferguson Wyman 
Christopher J. Yahnis 
Ronald Taylor York 



e 



*As of the Class of 1949 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



With Honors 



Albert Russell Broude 
"Albin John Jodka 
Stanley Thomas Lis 



Walter Henry Abrahams 
Melvin Andelman 
Edward Einer Anderson 
Thomas Steve Andrews 
Pierre Angers, II 

*Marvin Aronson 
Donald Melvin Askin 

*Phillip Paul Awad 
Edward James Barnicle 
David Sargent Bayer 
Robert Bean 

Edward Charles Beauregard 
Donald Ernest Blomquist 
John Edward Bradbury 
John Joseph Buckley 
William Albert Buckley 

*Kenneth Robert Burns 
John Edward Byrnes 
Walter Purcell Cahill, Jr. 
Robert Harvey Chapdelaine 
William Frank Christensen 
Thomas Edward Clark, Jr. 
Merwin Cohen + 
Edward Michael Coogan 
William Francis Crimmin 
Alexander Forbes Cullen, Jr. 
Edgar Reginald D'Abre 
Robert Esmond Daniels 



Lawrence Francis McGonagle 
Edward Meyer Plotkin 
Myron Emanuel Shapiro 

Howard Ernest Denny 

John Lisle DeNyse 

John Nickolas DeSalvo 

Frank John Dever, Jr. 

Joseph Francis Dillman, Jr. 

Edward William Doran 
*Donald Jerome Dowd 

James Hoar Duffy 

Sewell Nightingale Dunton, Jr. 

Herbert Martin Freedman 

Winfield Scott Fuller 

Charles Curtis Goldfarb 

Everett A. Greel, Jr. 

John Lawrence Grimes 

Hendrik Guziejk 

Bernard Harris 
*Nelson Walter Hearn 

Warren Arthur Holway 

Clement Powell Houran 

Paul Gerard Hussey 

Joseph Jacobs 

Thomas Paul J agger 

Robert Lawrence Jepson 

Raymond Edward Johnson 

Stanleigh Irving Johnson 

George Albert Jones 

Robert John Joyce 

Joseph Maurice Kane 



HJU- y^U^- 



■aJ Oft 




^CfiST>£« 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



1 



Degrees 



of t 



of i 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DONALD HAVLEY 
resolution 



app 
thi 
and 

195 



-i f\ *\r> 



r* ~4 ^~„+ I «-. C\WA r>a. fmViorcf 



*Thomas Daniel Kelley 
Charles Mason King 
Robert Warren Kraines 
Fred John Kulaga 
Alvin Harold Liftman 
Grant Wesley Locke 
Alan Max Lustig 
Richard Dudley Magoon 

*John Joseph Mahoney, Jr. 
Ronald Edward Marshall 
William Donovan Matthews 
John Francis McAuliffe 
William Francis McCann 
Robert Connor McManimon 

*Martin William McNamara 
Robert Anderson Miller 
Edward John Molitoris 
Donald Channing Monson 
George Francis Morgan 
Rudolph Francis Mutter, Jr. 
Chandler Whipple Newell 

*Neil William Newton 
William James Niland, Jr. 
Carl Sterner Oberg 
1 Alphonse Vincent Pachcsis 
Peter Pano 
Edgar Stanley Parent 
Richard Shepard Parkes 

*Leon Perekslis 
Francis Xavier Peters 
Armando Ralph Petrino 
Charles Walton Phelps 
Alfred Ernest Pigeon 
Roy William Pitman 
Paul Stephen Piusz 
Robert Arthur Porter 
William Joseph Quinn 
Murray David Radio 
Edward Milton Ramsey, Jr. 



* As of the Class of 1949 



Paul Beaune Ranncnberg 
John Ellsworth Reddick 
George Francis Reynolds 
Frederick William Roche 
Robert Arthur Rocheleau 
Mark Benjamin Rogers 
Samuel David Rosenberg 
Richard Bernard Ryan 
Eliot Howard Sagan 
Fred Julius Schaake 
Marvin Ernest Seidenberg 
Charles John Shannon 
Sheldon Merritt Shattuck 
Austin Benedict Sica 
Robert William Small 
Marie Allene Smith 
Sheldon Eugene Smith 
Robert Olaf Sondrol 
George L. Stasikelis 
Arthur Alward Stephens 
Edmund Joseph Struzziero 
Henry Blackwell Suprenant 
James Thomas Swanick 
Charles Vincent Taugher 
Joseph Testarmata 
John George Thompson 
James Francis Tidd 
Walter Fletcher Tidman 
Robert Martin Tippett 
Martin Tuhna 
Robert Miller Tyson 
William Joseph Ward 
Robert Lewis Watson 
Joseph John Wehry, Jr. 
John Clifford Welch 
Alan Dexter Wheeler 
Henry Sylvester Whyte 
Fred Ziwotowski 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



*John Isaac Babbitt 



Randall Lawson Dean 
Franklin Bond Wetherbe 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



o 



year 
ce 



Next 
Meeting 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

With Honor 
John Francis Fleming 



e 



Robert Charles Bates 
Allan John Estey, Jr. 
Irving Jacob Gross 



Leo George Judge 
William Edward Kenney 
William Dunne Thomas O'Toole 
Alan Paul Rockwood 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



With Honors 



Remi Joseph Bourdages 

Melvin Cohen 

Richard H. Homewood 

Clark Douglas Adair 
Paul Putnam Armstrong 
Stewart Angus Bain 
John Joseph Bergen 
Gunnar Robert Berglund 
C. Russell Blomerth 
John Vincent Brink 
Calvin Cutler Brown 
Frank Joseph Bukoski 
Samuel Cohen 
Alfred Courtines 
"Claude Louis Crepeau 
Marcel Leo Desrosiers 
Hugh Francis Elder 
Antonio Ferreira 
William Bartlett Gannon 
Harold Stewart Gillis, Jr. 
Stanley Bernard Goldberg 
George Wilfred Goldie 
Clifton Robert Grinnell 
Arthur Ralph Groves 
William Alexander Hampton, Jr. 
Thomas Edward Hanlon 
Edward Charles Hickey 



Harold William Kallin 
Francis Joseph Murphy 
Frank Valente 

William Arthur Horton 
Kenneth Bufton Howe 
John Koopman, Jr. 
John Lincoln Lowe 
Robert Edward Luciano 
Louis Francis Maffei 
Leroy Edward Mentor 
Leon A. Murphy 
Paul Glenwright Nickerson 
Leonard Joseph Peterson 
Theodore Gerard Pineault 
Allan Lothrop Pitcher 
Richard Martin Power 
Joseph Arthur Roulier 
Irving Franklin Rounds 
Edward Schwartz, Jr. 
Isaiah Snow, Jr. 
Herbert Stuart Stillings, Jr. 
Murray Merton Tatham 
Eugene Alfred Taylor 
John Parker Wellington 
Richard Peter Wynn 
Raymond Zintz 



* As of the Class of 1949 



I 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



of t. 



of 1 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

With Highest Honors 
William Francis Higgins William Dalton Hogan 

With High Honors 

Arthur Lawrence DiVenuti Earl Norman Hansen 

John Edward Hall Arthur Seymour Laurilliard, Jr. 

Armand Rene Tanguay 



Jay Truman Doane 
Edward Leon Gilfix 
Arlindo Jorge 



With Honors 

John Joseph Lawler 
Walter Paul Plucinski 
William George Priest 
Juhn Michael Supranovicz 



HUGH BAKER 




resolution 






app 


DONALD HAVLEY 




resolution 


thi 




and 




195 



Kazia Adams 
Seymour M. Alter 
Samuel Joseph Ameen 
Welton Richard Ballard 
William Stephen Barron 
Alan Henry Belgard 
Paul Edmond Bennett 
*Russell Scott Bronson 
John Francis Cleverly 
Lloyd S. Cohan 
Bradfield Joseph Collins 
Louis Emil Comeau 
Erwin Russell Coulson 
Terrance Edward Cunningham 
Carl Irving Cutler 
Marshall Henry David 
Henry Stewart Dickson 
Joseph Francis Ferrante 
Edward Anthony Fiorello 
William Harry Folkins, Jr. 
Robert Joseph Guertin 
James Matthias Harcourt 
John Bartholomew Hayes 
John Faulkner Hubbard 
Ray Herbert Hyde, Jr. 
Richard Ironfield, Jr. 



Nicholas Jais 
Bernard William Jalbert 
Donald Arthur Jameson 
Gunnar Kalevi Koskinen 
Edwin Albin Laitinen 
Edward Francis Ledgard 
Kenneth Anthony Lumenello 
Martin Joseph Manning, Jr. 
Frank Marsden, Jr. 
Robert Peter Minicucci 
William Mita 
Stewart Kendall Morton 
Jacques Murachver 
Richard Andrew Neece 
Harry Norkin 
Charles Nelson Paskauskas 
Irving Allen Peltier 
Milton Rome 
Joseph Alvin Short, Jr. 
Franklin Allen Simmons 
Nazarino Ralph Testarmata 
Alphonse Francis Torchia 
Marvin David Waldman 
John Mullen Webster 
Walter Gregory Weisse 
Peter Stanley Wicky 



* As of the Class of 1949 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



year 
ce 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Next 
Meeting 



Nicholas Boraski 



With High Honors 

Edward Novak 



With Honors 



Edward Harry Kusiak 
Henning August Sahlberg 

Christo Andrea 

George Sidney Anzuoni 

Elliot Jackson Atlas 

Ardashus Avedis Aykanian 

Harry Squier Baker 

Francis Irving Baratta 

John Robert Barry 

Edward Pierre Bartlett 

John A. Biernacki 

Harold Walter Bonneville 

Raymond Louis Borsetti 

Charles Peabody Brackett 

John Joseph Breen 

John Daniel Cairns 

Robert James Cardell 

Earl Stewart Carpenter, Jr. 

Alton Frank Carr 

William Aaron Carrington 

Robert Raymond Chapin 

Myron Anthony Chotkowski 

George Dale Clark 

Robert Maurice Conary 

Edward Francis Cousineau, Jr. 

Richard Fleming Creeron 
*David William Cuff 

Robert Gunner Dahlstrom 

Francis Albert Depuy 

Francis Timothy Desmond 

Eugene DiCesare 

Edwin Harry Dineley 

John Francis Donegan 

Clarence Edwin Doucette, Jr. 

Paul James Feeley 

Saul Finkel 
*William Joseph Foley 

Edward Charles Fontaine 



*Richard Wironen 
Henry Joseph Zaorski 

Joseph Paul Golas 
Edwin Richard Golus 
Marcel Joseph Grenier 
Donald Howe Guild 
Rolf O. Gullans 
Elliot Haytowitz 
Harold Gold Hazen, Jr. 
Nelson George Howard 
Edward Albert Humphrey 
Francis Barry Hyland 
Edmund William Jones 
John Paul Karpuk 
Loren Willis Kelley 
John Paul Kieronski 
Francis Benedict Kilduff, Jr. 
Carl Robert Kinney 
Clifford James Knox 
Arthur Lawrence Knutson 
Frank Stanley Kulas 
Harvey Joseph Lander 
Emil Lange, Jr. 
Kenneth Francis Lanzillo 
Einar Harry Larson 
Leo John Learner 
Clarence Leonard Ledin, Jr. 
Nathan Alvin Leveton 
Edward Liss, Jr. 
Paul Joseph Lombardi 
George Roland Louvaris 
George Wesley Lovewell 
Anthony Magina, Jr. 
Joseph Patrick Manning 
Walter Leahy Markham 
George William McGown 
Thomas David McLay 
John Francis Mullen 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J 



of t] 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DONALD HAVLEY 
resolution 



of i 



app 
thi 
and 

195 



A _U~,», ■ 



Horace Francis Nadeau 
John Richard Nelson 
Leo Gregory Nicholas 
*Joseph Roderick O'Gorman 
Thaddeus John Okolo 
Robert Francis O'Neill 
Ernest John Ouellet 
Nestor William Pandell 
Anthony Joseph Panzica 
Edwin Arthur Paul 
Joseph Stephen Paulson 
Gilbert Emerson Perkins 
Oresto Persechino 
Carl Lawrence Peterson 
Donald Henry Phipps 
Robert Sanborn Pinkham, Jr. 
Edwin Allan Pirie 
Frederick William Popp 
Robert Schyler Prouty 
Carmelo Anthony Puliafico 
Alfred James Rettie 
Ernest Leonell Richardson, Jr. 



John Michael Ritchie 
Everett George Ross 
Niles Mathew Schlegel 
Howard Edward Schulien 
Allister William Shepherd 
Alfred Sidel 
David Sokolow 
Paul Emmanuel Sullivan 
Stanley Walter Swiderski 
Dominick Joseph Swistro 
Sulo William Talvio 
Romolo Testarmata 
Francis Anthony Tomasunas 
Ernest Christopher Trimper 
Henry Joseph Tracy, Jr. 
Winthrop Bruce Vail 
Alfred Ernest Wandrei 
Ronald Victor Waters, Jr. 
George Alvin Wilder 
William Paul Wing 
Peter Wolff 



*As of the Class of 1949 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 

William Whittier Hamilton Robert Francis Lucey 

Henry Gordon Trimble 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Joan Frances Feld 
Gordon George Geis 
Quincy Wellington Gregory 



Elmer C. Martinson 
Howard Openshaw 
Abbott Fraser Reid 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



year 
ce 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Dagoberto Aguilar Vergara 
Raymond Joseph Amiro 
Warren Earl Anderson 
Thomas J. Army 
Warren Averill 
Emmett Washington Bassett 
Frank Wilbur Bates 
Edward Robert Bansh 
Jean Bayles 
Warren Maxwell Bock 
Richard Norman Bowler 
Frank R. Bridges, Jr. 
Hormoz Broumand-Nejad 
Hall G. Buzzell 
James Kenneth Cage 
Olvia Cambourelis 
William Wesley Cantelo 
James J. Casler 
Hsiu-fu Chao 
Roland J. Charlebois 
Thomas F. Clougherty 
Martha Burnham Coady 
Joel R. Cohen 
Gustavo Contesse-Pinto 
Anson R. Cooke 
Geoffrey St. John Cornish 
Andre Lucien Daniere 
John Edward Deady 
Robert Edward Diamond 
Eleanor Dillon 
George W. Doten 
John F. Duff 
Robert David Dunton 
William Edward Fenton 
Eugene Joseph Finnegan 
Charles Edward Flynn 
Robert Leo Fox 
Eva Gabrielsen 
William Joseph Good, Jr. 
Charlotte Greenfield 
Moyle E. Harward 
Helen Marie Hawley 
Marie C. Honney 
Howard E. Houghton 
Alphonse Joseph Jackowski 
Arthur J. Kavanagh, Jr. 
Marguerite Eleanor Keough 



e 



David Kronick 

Marcel Douglas Labbee 

Richard Joseph Lacey 

Lawrence Walter Lamery 

Francis George Langevin 

Jean Marie Lapensee 

Alfredo Marfori Lejano 

Kuang-Chiu Li 

Joseph John Licciardello 

Thomas Stanton Loeber 

John P. Lynch 

David Laurence Meggison, Jr. 

Edison Stanley Merritt 

John Allan Mullaly 

Anne Marie Murphy 

Francis J. Murphy 

Gertrude Ellen Murphy 

Dorathea Martin Nagel 

Olympia Navarro y Bunyi 

Richard Buck Neilson 

Kathleen Lilian O'Leary 

Olga Marion Olesiuk 

Irving- John Pflug 

E. Michael Pollack 

Ruth R. Raphael 

Hyman Roseman 

Irma L. Rossman 

Herbert Alan Rouisse 

Jon Anthony Sandrilla 

Henry Siddall Saulnier 

John Frederick William Schulze 

Shehata El-Sayed Shehata 

Louis Simeoni 

Robert Kingston Smith 

Samuel Peaslee Snow 

Philip James Spear 

Edwin I.Stoltz 

George Preston Tilley 

James P. Trainor 

Gordon Prescott Trowbridge 

Philip B. Turner 

Robert Joseph Vilece 

Charles Elliott Weinstein 

David Olds White 

Raymond Walkley Williamson 

Shou-Shih Yang 

Robert Rouben Zall 



Next 
Meeting 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



*■» £* t* * _ _ A r«U/-vV»( + 



J 



Degrees 



of t 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Mohamed Saved Abdel-Rahman 
David Werner Anderson, Jr. 
Norman Wilfred Desrosier 
Irving Seymour Fagerson 
Mohammed Abdul Ghani 
Ottilio Guernelli 
Jack Kern Krum 
Edward Anthony Nebesky 
Kenneth Raycraft Newman 
Phiroze Kaikhasru Patel 
Ikram Ahmed Rashid 



RECIPIENTS OF HONORARY DEGREES 

Earl Sumner Draper — Doctor of Landscape Architecture 
Herbert Charlesworth Brewer — Doctor of Science 
George Freeman Parmenter — Doctor of Science 
Percy LeBaron Spencer — Doctor of Science 
Ernest Elwood Stanford — Doctor of Science 
Sidney Waugh — Doctor of Fine Arts 



Of 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DONALD HAULEY 
resolution 



ap 
tfc 
an 



19 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



i 

i year 

ice 



HONORS 



Elected to Phi Kappa Phi 



John Vicent Abidian 

Burton Richard Anderson 

William Dean Athearn 

Rachel Louise Blouin 

Nicholas Boraski 

Remi Joseph Bourdages 

Bruce Tucker Bowens 

Francis Donald Brogan 

Horace Huntingdon Brown, Jr. 

Elizabeth Pauline Burr 

John Francis Byrne 

Charles Richard Carswell 

Estelle Rose Chase 

Melvin Cohen 

Theodore Delevoryas 

Arthur Lawrence DiVenuti 

Jay Truman Doane 

Peter Joseph Drevinsky 

Leonard Joseph Drohan 

John Francis Fleming 

Guy Arthur Franceschini 

Barbara Lucy Freeman 

Paul Adelard Gagnon 

Diana Louise Gallotta 

Theodore Joseph Goodman 

John William Grenier 

Anne Lackens Guba 

Stuart Richard Gunn 

Margot Fraser Hakes 

John Edward Hall 

Faye Hammel 

Earl Norman Hansen 

William Francis Higgins 

William Dalton Hogan 

Richard H. Homewood 

Albin John Jodka 

Arlindo Jorge 

Harold William Kallin 

John Thomas Katsanos 

Irving Noble Kelsey 



John Merriam Kingsbury 

Burton Jay Kolovan 

Edward Harry Kusiak 

Arthur Seymour Laurilliard, Jr. 

Anthony Lawrence 

Stanley Thomas Lis 

Howard Byron Lovering 

William Vincent Luti 

Dominic Alexander Marini 

Robert Joseph Meyer 

George Eugene Maurice 

Lawrence Francis McGonagle 

Homer Blaine Miller, Jr. 

Richard John Miller 

Alary Claire Morano 

John Vincent Moreau 

Francis Joseph Murphy 

Edward Novak 

John Anthony O'Connor 

Paul Arthur Perry 

George Alfred Peters, Jr. 

Clarence W. Peterson, Jr. 

Paul Pincus 

Edward Meyer Plotkin 

Walter Paul Plucinski 

Eugene Charles Putala 

Robert Ervin Putnam 

John Albert Rikert 

Emmanuel Mann Roth 

Edna Elizabeth Steinbeck 

Arden Claire Sullivan 

Amand Rene Tanguay 

Robert William Tighe 

Warwick Manson Tinsley, Jr. 

James P. Toomey 

Irving Wasserman 

Richard Wironen 

Alan Nelson Young 

Henry Joseph Zaorski 



*e 



o 



Next 
Meeting 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



From Graduate School 



Geoffrey St. John Cornish 
Hermon Ulysses Goodell 
Moyle E. Harward 
Joseph John Licciardello 



Anne Marie Murphy 
Olympia Navarro y Bunyi 
H. Russell Shaw 
Allen Silbergleit 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



K t N tttf.£ OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Ji 



Phi Beta Kappa Scholars 
Bruce Tucker Bowens 
Guy Arthur Franceschini 
Paul Adelard Gagnon 



Phi Kappa Phi Scholar 
Paul Adelard Gagnon 



Degrees 



of t 



of 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DONALD HAVLEY 
resolution 



a. 
tt 



DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

William Dean Athearn in Geology 
George Elian Battit in Zoology 
Paul Emile Bernardin in Entomology 
Marion Boody Berry in Home Economics 
Philip James Blanchard in Dairy Industry 
Henry George Boucher, Jr. in Economics 
Francis Donald Brogan in English 
Richard Henry Burt in Forestry 
Jacqueline Crosby in Psychology 
Paul Taylor Doherty in Floriculture 
Peter Joseph Drevinsky in Chemistry 
Barbara Lucy Freeman in Zoology 
David Gerard Gabrielsen in Economics 
Theodore Joseph Goodman in Zoology 
John William Grenier in Chemistry 
Stuart Richard Gunn in Chemistry 
Margot Fraser Hakes in Zoology 
Faye Hammel in English 
Donald Edward Hattin in Geology 
Burton Jay Kolovson in Economics 
Melvin Ralph Mailloux in Economics 
Dominic Alexander Marini in Olericulture 
Richard Gorham Nickerson in Chemistry 
Edwin Joseph Orlowski in Zoology 
Frank Quimby Orrall in Physics 
Jean Zelman Perkins in Economics 
Robert Ervin Putnam in Chemistry 
Emmanuel Mann Roth in Zoology 
William Smith Ryder, Jr. in Olericulture 
Bernard Melvin Slavin in Economics 
Jeannette Marian Tonner in Entomology 
Anita Marie Torres in History 



Special Award of Prize Books for Outstanding Work in French 

from the French Government to: 

John Vincent Abidian Rachel Louise Blouin 

Alexis Adelbert Caron 



ar 



IS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



i year 
ce 



>e 



Next 
Meeting 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



1594 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



'"■mtitoq r\v RTiMT-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



HUGH BAKER 
resolution 

DOKALD HAWLEY 
resolution 



of 1 



of 



a. 
tl 

ari 
IS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED ; To meet on Wednesday, June 28 at 11:00 A.M. at the 

University to act on the University budget for the year 
beginning July 1, 1951 if this suits the convenience 
of Chairman Bartlett. 

It was 

VOTED : To add Ernest Hoftyzer to the Legislative Committee 
of the Trustees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:4-5 A.M. 




Secretary 



| Or^jX. lxr ^> QkAXtJXC C hairman 



O 1 



Next 
Meeting 



Addition to 
legislative 
Committee 



1596 



TRUSTEE 



Hugh P. Baker 



Donald P. Hawley 



Budget 



Supplementary 



Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 2%, 1950, 11:00 A.M., Farley 4-H Club Rouse, Amherst 



Chairman Bartlett, presidin, 



PRESENT; 



Trustees Bartlett, Cashin, Deely, Whitmore, 
Chandler, Taber, Brown, Hubbard, Brett, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke, Registrar Lanphear 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and reading of the 
minutes of the last previous meeting. 

It was 

VOTED : Unanimously to adopt the following resolution: 

(Copy attached) 

It was 

VOTED : Unanimously to adopt the following resolution: 

(Copy attached) 

Treasurer Hawley presented brief report on the status of 
the budget for the year beginning July 1, 1950. He emphasized that 
he has not had final word since the passage of the budget but to the 
best of his Knowledge tne budget passed for the University in the 
amount of $4,54-6,450. represents a reduction of $1,452,450. from the 
original Trustee request. The supplementary budget in the amount of 
$291,770. has yet to be passed on by the Legislature. The Presi- 
dent pointed out that this will mean that the University will not 
undertake any proposed new projects and will be undermanned in 
operation of its present programs. However, in view of the austerity 
program of the state it is the best that can be hoped for this year. 
It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Legislative Committee of the Trustees 

to communicate with the Ways & Means Committee and 
others emphasizing the importance to the University of 
passage of the supplementary budget including the 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



appropriation for the Boarding Hall. Without the 
supplementary budget several University services must 
be curtailed and the Boarding Hall in particular woulc 
be unable to operate through the whole year. 

Registrar Lanphear reported on admissions and 

admission requests for the fall of 1950. Despite the fact that 

veterans are almost entirely out of the picture in the entering 

class, the requests for admission are larger than ever and hundreds 

of well qualified students have had to be refused. 

The Trustees spent most of the meeting time in examining 

the proposed budget of the University for the year beginning July 1, 

1951* This budget was mailed to the Trustees in advance of the 

meeting. Treasurer Hawiey presented the budget item by item and the 

Treasurer, President and Secretary answered questions and provided 

further explanations for the Board. It was then 

VOTED: To authorize the administration to submit the proposed 
budget as revised by the Trustees in the amount of 
$5,645,881. anc * a l s ° "to allow the .administration to 
make minor substitutions within this total to meet needs 
arising between now and September 15 when the budget 
must be submitted to the Budget Commissioner. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the promotion of Chester Cross at the Wareham 
Field Station from Assistant professor to Associate 
Professor rather than to full Professor as originally 
proposed by the Director of the Experiment Station. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the administration to submit a capital 

outlay budget covering the period July 1, 1951 through 
June 30, 1955 in the amount of $10, 844-, 950 of which 
i,239,450 is for the year beginning July 1, 1951* 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Secretary Burke reported on follow-up of Trustee meeting of] n n - v <=>rsitv 

Extension 



Admission of 
Students 



Budget 



Chester Cross 



May 12 on the subject of University Extension programs in cooperation 

with the State Department of Education. He said that Commissioner 
Desmond had approved the proposed program to be carried at pittsfield 



Program 



1598 



TRUSTEE 



Personnel for 
University 
Extension 
Program 



Hemond 

Scholarship 

Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and further had requested the University to cooperate in a program of 

college level instruction for Army air forces men and officers at 

Westover Field. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the attached agreement for a cooperative 
plan of instruction by which the University and the 
State Department of Education will provide instruction 
for the Army air forces at Westover. 

Secretary Burke explained that the officers at Westover 
Field are also interested in making extension courses available to 
personnel stationed at Bermuda, Tripoli and the Azores. They would 
like to have two ins tractors assigned to each base to provide college 
level courses and would provide tuition payment in an amount to offset 
the salary costs of the instructors. They would also provide class- 
room facilities and supply transportation for the instructors. They 
would also provide living quarters and food at reasonable prices. 
Dther requests for University Extension courses are pending. The 
Department of Education wishes the University to provide college 
courses for nurses and for high school teachers on an extension basis 
After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Administration to add an item of 

$32,100 t° the budget for the year beginning June 1, 195^ 
for the services of 2 Associate Professors, 3 Assistant 
Professors, and 5 Instructors to meet University 
Extension demands. 

At the request of President Van Meter, Secretary Burke read 
a. proposal from Conrad J. Hemond, Sr., of Holyoke. Mr. Hemond pro- 
poses to create a scholarship fund in the amount of $2500 from which 
Interest in the approximate amount of f 50 would be available for an 
annual scholarship award to a deserving student without regard to sex, 
race, creed or color but who shall be a resident of either the city 
of Holyoke, Massachusetts, or the town of South Hadley, Massachusetts 
tfr. Hemond stipulates that whatever worthy student may be selected or 



JSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

nominated by the Scholarship Committee, under the direction of the 

Board of Trustees, shall be approved by the oldest living direct 

descendant of Agnes Louise Crean Hemond before the award is made. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To leave the acceptance of this scholarship and its 
terms in the hands of the President and the Chairman 
of the Board. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to offer the services of 
the University to the United States Department of 
Defense and to stand ready to help in any way that 
may be required by conditions facing the Nation. 

It was 

VOTED : To confirm action of the Executive Committee of the 
Trustees in approving War Department Supply Contract 
Form #1, approved by the Undersecretary of War, 
December 16, 194-1 > by which the University of Massa- 
chusetts and the Springfield ordnance District agree 
to establish a District Gage Laboratory at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts and to authorize the Treasurer 
to sign said contract in the name of and for the Board 
of Trustees subject to clearance of the contract with 
the Attorney General and with the Commission on 
Administration and Finance. « 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to execute contract for the 
purchase of a turbine generator from the General 
Electric Company, the low bidder, at a price of $58, 600 
and to sign said contract in the name of and for the 
Board of Trustees. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to execute a contract for 
construction of a garage for armored vehicles, and to 
execute a contract for construction of an arms storage 
building in accordance with requirements of the Public 
Building Commission and to sign said contracts in the 
name of and for the Board of Trustees in a total amount 
for the two not to exceed balance available in the 
appropriation . 

Treasurer Hawiey explained that the Veterans Administration 
regulations were revised last August and under the new requirements 



U 






Services of 
University to 
United States 
Dept. of Defense 



District Gage 
Laboratory 



Turbine 
Generator 



Garage for 

Armored 

Vehicles 



Veterans 

Administration 
Regulations 



.. 



1600 



TRUSTEE 



Unearmarked 
Trust Funds 



Tena Bishop 

Leave of 
absence 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

payments to the University must be based upon a contract at a rate 
fixed by a formula prescribed by the Veterans Administration known 
as "Cost of Instruction". This covers teaching salaries plus 15% 
presumed to cover cost of supplies. Since last September, the Uni- 
versity negotiated with the veterans Administration to obtain a 
contract for the academic year 1949-50. It now appears that this 
contract is about to be approved by the Veterans Administration on a 
basis which will yield approximately $350 per veteran per year. The 
Treasurer says that he believes this is the best contract the Uni- 
versity can obtain. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to execute contract with the 
Veterans -administration covering payment for instruction 
services to veterans for one year from September 1, 194-9 
in accordance with Veterans Administration regulations 
and to authorize the Treasurer to sign said contract in 
the name of and for the Board of Trustees. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the President to expend not to exceed $1000 
* from the income of unearmarked endowment funds during 
the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1950. 

President Van Meter recommended that the Trustees change 

the period of time for the sabbatical leave previously granted to 

Miss Tena Bishop. Miss Bishop was granted a sabbatical leave of one 

year by the Board of Trustees in 194B-49. She completed one semester 

at Columbia University and was then recalled because of the illness 

3.nd subsequent death of Miss Marion Forbes, her partner in carrying 

the 4-H Club program for girls. Miss Bishop has a $500 scholarship 

award from the Farm & Garden Association which she would lose if she 

sould not return to Columbia in the spring of 1951. She would also 

be in danger of losing credits earned at Columbia toward the Master's 

iegree. 



1601 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : Unanimously to change the dates of the sabbatic leave 
for Miss Tena Bishop so that her year 1 s leave may be 
completed during the period February 1 - May 1, 1951 
on the basis of one-half salary. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 P.M. 




Secretary 



(jo^^X, iv-ftq/vbUM, Chai 



rman 



1602 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



HUGH P. BAKER 

Resolved that the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts express their deep regret upon the loss through death of 
Dr. Hugh P. Baker, President of the University from 1933 to 1947. 
The Trustees are profoundly appreciative of the high purpose and 
rare vision which Dr. Baker brought to the presidency and of the 
untiring energy through which he realized his vision in the creation 
of a great University. During his presidency, Dr. Baker strengthened 
and broadened the curriculum with particular emphasis upon the 
humanities and fine artsj the Bachelor of Arts degree was added to 
the University offerings, the student body was more than doubled 
and the physical plant greatly expanded. 

President Baker met the challenge of the war years by 
adopting an outstanding training program at the University for 
members of the Army Air Forces. In the post war years he met the 
challenge of veterans education through expansion of the facilities 
at Amherst and through the development of a branch at Fort Devens. 
In this period he added curricula in Business Administration, 
Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Chemical Engi- 
neering. His eager interest in the University and his untiring 
energy were transmitted to the staff and to members of groups and 
organizations throughout the Commonwealth so that the small college 
over which he presided in 1933 became the great State University 
from which he retired in 1947. 

The Trustees will ever remember President Baker* s great 
and inspiring personality and leadership, his integrity of character 
and his perseverance and achievements in the face of countless 
obstacles. 



1603 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



STEE 



Be it also resolved that this sentiment be entered upon 
the official records of the Board and copies transmitted to his 
family. 



1604 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Donald P. Hawley 



Resolved ; That the Trustees express their deep regret upon 
the loss through death of Donald P. Hawley and 
their appreciation of his 17 years of efficient 
service as Manager of the University Store; that 
this sentiment be entered upon the official 
records of the Board and a copy transmitted to 
his widow. 



FLAN FOR 

the 
MASSACHUSETTS DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSA 

with the ' K OF M ; . CS„ 

SUMii-MIMfffilJJSII.MSlL.i.' 1 * te responsible tor 

1. serving as gency I 1 States Air : aad 
>*ersity of 

2. drawing up and signing contract with P for ■&© eosdwet of -classes 
at Westover J •■ or a- kinase 

planning & rotation ■■■arses to corcTespo&d Tilth the University of H&ssa- 
chm squire ing c ;t of co;; . ... cooj 

tion with the be; 

students cad collection < >b from U&1F; 

through state appropri a for pe; of instruction costs; 

6« paying is otors for their services; 

7. awarding certlficat nts at the successful conclusion of each 

individual course/ 



7ERSJTI ACHtfSiTTS vould he responsible for 

1« determining eligibility of students to mstrieul&ta in the University of 
ssachusetts; 

2o evaluating the p~ education of thos Lege progran 

and suggesting a program of cc s which : be completed in order to complete tve 
years of college work (60 - r hours) or to qualify for a baccal;. ■.. /ce degree* Th 
evaluation would be ■ mly for its who h eessfully completed at 

least two 3-e courses off ©rod by t.li- sity of Massachusetts; 

3. accepting for credit toward these the courses conducted at Wsstover Air 

Base or at the On' ity of I chusetts in cooperation with . ■ahusetts Division 
of University Extension; 

rs and of course « . . at and ol :vS; 

■ .: lege credit; 

6. pro y of ! '/tg for cours 

which csnnc | 



7 priding statwwBt- ■ . .; jears of col^g® 

, w* accopwd for 

b to S^redit cootim offered * 



the Onivara 

.filled the Tfoiveraity 

,@ios hoars of credit 

/'er Air B&:: 
I 

, > eol i r Mr Bag#$ 

. Llitaiy and coll^g: k for sach student 

ity of M -is ia e^mliiaiisag 

,1 stndanta, pie* p»M of study; 

4. providing * ite facilities fs aid at ¥esio*er Air Bass; 

^ _■ atlm and BdtaoaU(m hMdqoariMW 

to take car© a eoiaiseiion vitli the progra 



L^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



October U, 1950 



Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated September 25 from Secretary 

Burke to members of the Board of Trustees of the University of 

Massachusetts and the resultant mail ballot are hereby made part 



of the official records of the Board. 



September 25, 1950 



Board of Trustees 
University of .Massachusetts 

Enclosed are minutes of meeting of the Trustee Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds of the University of Massachusetts which 
took place Friday, September 22. Chairman Bartlett and the 
members of the committee feel that it is urgent that construction 
begin as early as possible on the new dining hall for which the 
Legislature appropriated $600,000 and on the Isolation Building 
addition to the Animal Disease Control Laboratory for which the 
Legislature appropriated $90,000. 

In these minutes the committee recommends that Maloney 
& Tessier of Springfield be appointed as architect for the Dining 
Hall with James A. Britton of Greenfield and Hampson & Fisher of 
Pittsfield as alternates. The committee also recommends that 
Louis W. Ross be appointed as architect for the Isolation Building 
addition with Alderman St Alderman of Holyoke and McClintock & 
Craig of Springfield as alternates. The committee requested that 
the Secretary obtain a mail poll from the Trustees as early as 



possible. 



Ballot is enclosed herewith. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ James V. Burke 
Secretary, ooard of Trustees 



1605 



Dining Commons 



Animal Disease 
Control 

Laboratory 



1606 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MAIL BALLOT 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds of the Board of Trustees of the University of 

Massachusetts, 

I vote to appoint Maloney & Tessier of Springfield 
as architect for the Dining Hall vith James A. Britton 
of Greenfield and Hampson & fisher of Pittsfield as 
alternates. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds of the Board of Trustees of the University of 

Massachusetts, 

I vote to appoint Louis W. Ross of Boston as 
architect for the Isolation Building addition to 
the Animal Disease Control Laboratory with 
Alderman & Alderman of Hoiyoke and McClintock & 
Craig of Springfield as alternates. 



Signed: 



J. W. Bartlett 
Aid en C. Brett 
Harry Dunlap Brov/n 
Leonard Carmichael 
William ii. Cashin 
John ^handler 
J. M. Deely 



John J. Desmond, Jr, 
Ernest Hoftyzer 
Clifford C." Hubbard 
Lottie A. Leach 
¥. A. Orton 
Ralph F. Taber 
Philip F. Whitmore 




o^i>uL uAJoajjuu 



Secretary 



Chairman 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

October 18, 1950, 6:30 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brown, 
Caraichael, Chandler, Deely, Hoftyzer, 
Hubbard, Mrs. i»each, Mrs. McNamara, 
Orton, Taber, whitmore, President 
Van Meter, Treasurer &awley, Secretary 
Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last previous meeting. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To approve the actions of that committee at 
its meeting of September 22, 1950. 

Chairman Vhitmore called particular attention to the fact that on 
September 22 his committee had recommended that the dining room and 
kitchen originally proposed for the new men' s dormitory be 
eliminated from the plans because of the impossibility of construct- 
ing the building with dining facilities within the authorized funds. 

Trustee Brett reported that the University of Massachu- 
setts Building Association opened bids recently for construction of 
a new men's dormitory. He reported that the lowest bid received was 
$732, 000 and that the Association has $691,000 for construction 
purposes. They have, therefore, had to make certain changes in 
specifications of the building to come within the available funds. 
The Trustees agreed that it was necessary to have the building and 
agreed to changes in specifications to stay within available funds. 



1607 



Men's 
Dormitory 



1608 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



Trustee Brett said that plaster walls between rooms have 
been given up in favor of cinder block partitions, some limestone 
ornamental bands have been eliminated, one trunk lift has been 
omitted, the slate roof has been changed to asphalt shingles, 
glazed tile has been eliminated on the stairwells, tiling in por- 
tions of the baths has been reduced in height, a different kind of 
flashing has been adopted, boxing of pipes in the rooms has been 
eliminated as well as picture molding. 

Trustee Brett explained that it may be possible as con- 
struction proceeds to re-introduce several of these items. 



On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: That the form of lease of a parcel of land 
for the erection of one student dormitory 
from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
University of Massachusetts Building Associa- 
tion, pursuant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 388, 
as amended by Acts of 194-5, Chapter 390, and 
by Acts of 194-6, Chapter 352, and by Acts of 
194-8, Chapter 185, and by Acts of 1950, 
Chapter 414-, be and hereby is approved as 
presented to this meeting; and that the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts, or a 
majority thereof, be and hereby are authorized, 
in the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth ' 
of Massachusetts, to execute, acknowledge and 
deliver, in or substantially in the form pre- 
sented to this meeting, said lease of land 
from the Commonwealth to the Association and 
to cause the common seal of the University of 
Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : That the form of lease of one student dormi- 
tory by University of Massachusetts Building 
Association to the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, pursuant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 383, 
as amended by Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, and 
by Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, and by Acts of 
194-3, Chapter I85, and by Acts of 1950, 
Chapter 4JU-, said building to be erected by 
said Association on s, parcel of land to be 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

leased to it by the Commonwealth, be and 
hereby is approved as presented to this 
meeting; and that the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts, or a majority 
thereof be and hereby are authorized, in 
the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, to execute, acknowledge and 
deliver, in or substantially in the form pre- 
sented to this meeting, said lease of one 
building from said Association to the Common- 
wealth and to cause the common seal of the 
University of Massachusetts to be affixed 
thereto. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the formation of a separate 
Department of Philosophy and a separate 
Department of Sociology in the College of 
Arts and Science. 

President Van Meter reviewed previous informal discussions 
with members of the Board in which he had outlined his plans for 
eventually bringing together under one Head, all of the agricultural 
services offered by the University. He said that for sometime the 
feeling on campus has developed toward this amalgamation and he now 
sees his way clear to bring this about not only without ill feeling 
on the campus but with the active backing of all concerned. His 
proposal is to bring the now separate Schools of Agriculture and 
Horticulture into one school and to have the Dean of this School 
also be Director of the Experiment Station and to have under his 
jurisdiction the Extension Service and the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture. 

This arrangement of all agriculture under one head who 
reports directly to the President is in practice at many of the 
land-grant colleges in the middle west. It is possible to make the 



Dept. of 
Philosophy 

Dept. of 
Sociology 






1610 



TRUSTEE 



School of 
Agriculture and 
Horticulture 



Sieling, Dale H. 



Dean of Agri- 
culture and 
Director of the 
Experiment StatidnDr. Sieling would have under his jurisdiction the School of Agri- 



Col&r, William G. 

Head, Dept. of 
Agronomy 



Graduate School 



Voodside, Gilbert 
L. - Dean of the 
Graduate School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

change now because of the retirement of Fred J. Sievers, Director 
of the Experiment Station as of October 31* 1950. Director Munson 
of the Extension Service will retire in January of 1951* After- 
discussion and on the recommendation of the President, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To create a School of Agriculture and 
Horticulture which would bring together 
all agricultural work on the campus. 



It was 



VOTED: To appoint Dr. Dale H. Sieling as Dean of 
Agriculture and Director of the Experiment 
Station effective November 1, 1950. 



culture and Horticulture, the Experiment Station, the Extension 

Service and the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To promote Dr. William G. Colby from Pro- 
fessor to Head of the Department of 
Agronomy. 

President Van Meter recommended that on the retirement of 

Director Sievers at the end of October, the Graduate School be 

separated from the Experiment Station. Director Sievers has been 

Director of the Experiment Station and Dean of the Graduate School. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To appoint Dr. Gilbert L. Woodside as Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

Dr. Woodside will also continue as Head of the Department of Zoology 

and Physiology. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Executive Secretary of the 
Alumni Association to act as conference host 
for the University with the understanding 
that the President shall approve which groups 
may use University facilities. 

The President said that under the present arrangement the University 
has been unable to give proper attention to housing accommodations 
for visiting groups. The Alumni Association will provide registra- 
tion, maid and bellhop service, towels and soap, identification 
tags, campus guides and sport, picnic and recreational facilities. 
The Alumni Executive Secretary will collect a fee from each visitor 
for services rendered and pay to the University the regular 
charges for room and board. Any balance over and above cost to the 
Commonwealth will be used by the Alumni to finance the new services 
provided to the guests. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached revised athletic 
charter. 

Dr. Van Meter reported that Dr. Leon Bradley, Head of the 

Department of Bacteriology and Public Health has been loaned for a 

period of two years to the State Department of Public Health. 

Dr. Bradley will spend part of his time in Amherst and will continue 

to supervise policies of the Department of Bacteriology and Public 

Health. The University would not be responsible for his salary 

during this period. It was 

VOTED : To appoint Ralph L. France as Professor of 

Bacteriology and Public Health on a temporary 
basis during the leave of Dr. Bradley. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the attached new courses of study. 



1611 



Conference 
host - Executive 
Secretary of 
Alumni Associa- 
tion 



Athletic 
Charter 



Bradley, Leon A. 



France, Falph L. 



New Courses 



1612 



TRUSTEE 



Goldberg, 
Maxwell H. - 
sabbatical 
leave 



Gaunt, Stanley 
N. - 

sabbatical 
leave 



Glick, Harry N. 

sabbatical 
leave 



By-Laws - 
revision of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To approve sabbatical leave for Dr. Maxwell 
H. Goldberg during the first semester of the 
academic year 1951-52. This leave is for 
the purpose of completion of research on 
Carlisle, study of language communication 
and literature, and reorganization of 
Dr. Goldberg's elective courses in English. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve sabbatical leave for Stanley N. 
Gaunt, Extension Dairyman for one year at 
half pay beginning in September of 1951* 
This leave is for the purpose of doing 
graduate work for the Master 1 s and Doctor's 
degrees in Animal Breeding at Pennsylvania 
State College. 

It was 

VOTE D; To approve sabbatical leave for Professor 
Harry H» Glick for the second semester of 
the college year 1951-52 to attend the 
University of California at Berkeley and to 
attend the summer school of the University 
of Hawaii which emphasizes Oriental and 
comparative philosophy. 

The President said that these leaves were recommended 
with the proviso that Ways and Means Committee of the Legislature 
does not prohibit sabbatical leaves during that period. 

The Trustees then considered revision of the By-Laws 

especially in view of the consolidation of the agricultural services 

of the University and voted the following changes. 

1. Under Article I to delete the sentence which 
reads "all payments of $2,000 or more, except 
for salaries or fixed sums, shall be subject 
to the approval of the Trustee Committee on 
Finance." 

Treasurer Hawley explained that under the present arrangement all 

expenditures regardless of amount are approved by the Board of 

Trustees through the Trustee's authorization for the President or 



JSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Secretary or Treasurer to act for the Board in the signing of daily 
schedules which go to the Comptroller's Office. The Treasurer ex- 
plained the State House procedures by which funds are strictly 
controlled . 



2. 



3. 



4. 



5. 



Under Article II the first paragraph shall 
be amended so as to read "There shall be 
two stated meetings of the Trustees in each 
year; the first to be known as the annual 
meeting, at which officers shall be chosen 
and the annual report made, shall be held 
in February at the State House in Boston at 
the call of the Chairman or at such place 
as the Trustees at any previous meeting may 
determine. The second meeting shall be held 
in Amherst during the Commencement period at 
the call of the Chairman." 

Under Article IV, paragraph one shall be 
changed so as to read "There shall be seven stand- 
ing committees to Wit: (1) Committee on Finance; 

(2) Committee on Faculty and Program of Study; 

(3) Committee on Buildings and Grounds; (4.) 
Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture; (5) 
Committee on Recognized Student Activities; 
(6) Committee on Legislation; (7) Executive 
Committee. 

Under Article IV, paragraph two, sentences 
5, 6, and 7 shall be deleted and in their 
place shall be substituted the following: 
"The Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 
shall act upon matters pertaining to Agri- 
culture and Horticulture. The Committee on 
Recognized Student Activities shall act upon 
matters pertaining to organized athletics, 
academic activities, student government and 
other recognized student organizations or 
groups . " 

Under Article VII, the word "Deans" shall be 
added to the list of administrative officers. 



It was 

VOTED: That all changes in the By-Laws as listed 
above shall be effective as of October 19, 
1950 except the changes in the committees. 
Changes involving committees shall be effective 
as of the date of the next annual meeting of 
the Board. 



1613 



1614 



TRUSTEE 

Association of 
Governing Boards 
of State Univer- 
sities and Allied 
Institutions. 

Trustee ¥hitmore 



Morris, Bruce R, 

Professor of 
Economics 



President - 
salary of 



Ascension Farm 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chairman to name a delegate 
to the annual meeting of the Association of 
Governing Boards of State Universities and 
Allied Institutions. This meeting is to 
take place November 1 to 5 in Charleston, 
South Carolina. 

Chairman Bartlett named Trustee Whitmore to represent 

the Board at this meeting. 

Upon the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To promote Bruce R. Morris from Associate 
Professor to Professor of Economics as of 
September 1, 1950. 

Chairman Bartlett recommended that the Trustees introduce 

a bill in the Legislature to fix the salary of the President at 

$15,000 and if possible to provide a house for the President free 

of cost. It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To request the Committee on Legislation 
to prepare and file a bill to fix the 
salary of the President at $15,000 and 
to provide housing for the President free 
of cost. 

The Treasurer explained to the Trustees that the 

Trustees of the Ascension Farm School, which is no longer operating, 

have petitioned the Probate Court of Berkshire County for permission 

to transfer their assets to the Trustees of the University. The 

petition specifies that these assets are to be held in trust and 

the income is to be used for "the care, education and training in 

agriculture of boys resident in western Massachusetts." Question 

was raised as to the term "care" and it was 



JSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the Trustees be recorded as willing 
to accept the assets of the Corporation 
of the Ascension Farm School, these to be 
held in trust, to invest and re-invest the 
same and to apply the income therefrom for 
the education and training in agriculture 
of boys resident in Western Massachusetts. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to execute con- 
tract with L. V. Ross for architectural 
services on the Animal Disease Isolation 
Building in the name of and for the Board 
of Trustees. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to execute con- 
tract with Maloney and Tessier for archi- 
tectural services for the new Dining Hall 
in the name of and for the Board of Trustees. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that $39 > 000 may be made avail- 
able for the preparation of plans for the proposed Public Health 
Building to be located on the University campus. It was 

VOTED : To request the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds to recommend an architect to the 
Executive Committee of the Board which shall 
take final action on the appointment of an 
architect. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to execute con- 
tract in the amount of $32,744 with the 
A. B. Stanley Company for furnishing and in- 
stalling laboratory equipment in the Animal 
Disease Control Laboratory in the name of 
and for the Board of Trustees. 



The meeting was adjourned at 9 J 30 E.M 




"^ 



Aof^VA>^3 



jurvU-*AS 



^Secretary 
Chairman 



1615 



Ross, Louis W. 

Animal Disease 
Control Lab. 



Dining Commons 



Maloney & 
Tessier 



Public Health 
Building - 
architect for 



Animal Disease 
Control Lab. 



1616 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



- 

1 



le 

is such 

- 

E 

- 

LB 

- b. dace approval of the 

Fauci money beyond the budgetary ■■ 



■ 



c. Tna approval of all at c scb ss. 

d bhe a usignii 

athletic 3, 

8. The de 1 athletic j 

schedules., participation in post 

major letion, s - -s of siraile 

3» The .Director of Athletics direct supervision over all 

ities of the SJni . Lty ether than those indi< 
2. 

be co irss 

13 Of 

-.on ; the other sing fn 

o.f s. 

b. - to be 

c. Three students ~ one tte Varsity : 'M" 
Club 3 one student Senator, one student m &r of 

athletic team, chosen by their respective groups, 

d. The .Director of Athletics. 



6. The : 
mc 
o:: 
t 

- .1, The Ti an 

au July first of each 



Lie at . of all 

individual students re - ; shall be 

:4 by such m . by 
11, 

made 3d thai Council 11 recogu and conforms 

tons o sity • . tion concerning 

absence of rs fro t participation* 

3 - undcrsto ihai the Trustees* -r "by vol - acting 

jgh tt nt of the urn .ty? rese: ; 3? of 
veto over i LI. 



Segj 
Article 1, 

iune.il shall organise u a Vice-Chairman, a 

a Director of Athletic; xecutive Committee. 



he Counc 
Secretary^ 

Article 2. 



The Executive l aittee : - consist of five members as follows: 

of the C ■ 3e ere;- Ll 5 the Director 

of .: two • Council to a by the Council 

each yeaa te of .rnich must be a student. A majority of the Executive 
.e const! tote a quoru 






a the Counc: : . be filled in the manner prescribed "bgr 
2 regulations for their regular appointments. era appointed to 
L vnQi s shall hold office for the remainder of the unexpired term* 



I. 

i 

: 
i 

- 

: cf 



■ 



les of t I be to cttlX &nd ; id® at all 

meetings of the Council* 

Article 

3 curb: f the Vict ili bo to per. the duties of 

the Chairman in hj oe or v. 



Artiej,e 3< 



a, The duties at stary shall be to issue the call for 

al. . accurate record oJ n& 

oi : .i in a book d for the 

b« Ha s v . ocord of the award sport* 

c. He shall notify the Chairman of each Coaamittee chosen by 

CI of his appointment znti indi-v 1 of a 
duty assigned to him. 



Article 4- 






The president of 1 [Diversity shall write Ms endorsement into 
the records after each meeting. 

Article 5, 

It shall be the function of the Executive Committee to act in the 
interim between meetings of the Council upon any questions of policy or 
other proposals which may require immediate action. All actions of the 
Executive Committee shall be reviewed at the next meeting of the Council, 















" 


















i 



; bingi -' tii ■ ' . 

bs give; Bach s 



• 






Qu 



s*.UU 






■are shall constit^ tsaction of 

ssSj pro^i ; -ie faculty, the aluiani 5 as idergr&du&tes 

bative pres 



gi bll: . 



Art 1. 



alarly enrolled srgr^duate a tte In intercollegiate 

tics in accordance with the of the (XEiivorsity and 

b up 1: / . ; 

Lon 71 

: on ex Gai 






:•!! be elec aa,iority of 

Season's tea held 

immediately followir.- ■■ last contest, Ekcl . ' will 

on l;. ballot y led by the ; .ii an en ■ >e , wh: ; . 

en be sealed and -the mi ■ . his a the outside . All 

ballots are to \. i to the St - ' the manag 

rs of the . 



fter ' 

! 

3- 



: 






be if 
pt&in Kay '■ 

t is cast, 

dele 

?f a c: B vacant at a: before the ope: 

season :; tin ancy shall be f . vote of the lette as 
tesaa of previoi ibars voting in vrritr 

This election shall take place ir as specified in 

Article 1. 

;icl© 5. 



.-ii-r-i.»i 



If a Cfeptc-incy oes v.: at any time durin s season, the 
vacancy shala filled by a vote of the lettermen of i -port on the 
squad. This election shall tals ace in fee manner as specified 
in Article 1» 

Section VIII, 

Election of Student Managers 

sle 1. 

lidates for Assistant Manager in each intercollegiate 

:H at the opening of the season to ,nager 5 and compete 
until the end of t an, 

tide 2. 



At the end of the season -one dates -will be rated on the basis 
outlined in the Manages rid bo ok and the two highest candidates s?ill be 
named assistant managers in that :- during .:?. 

Article 3* 

»v>*Mlit« W» ar«f iimm _^« 

Immediately following tb Be of the season in their Sophomore year 
the tvo assistant managers will become candidates for the managership and 
•Hill ha voted upon in the same mi as for the Captaine;; 

Article 4» 

The unsuccessful candidate for the manager ship will become head 
r - ''. he Freshman e ty team in that spor 



1. 



- 



E 



the 

: 

■ 






The ■ \ nave the power* 1; a two-ifoirdg e, to re 

. >js office a as - - or e 

>f Letts; 

Letters shall be awarded at the end of each sport* s season to the 
manager arid the members of "the squad who have participated the entire season 
unless exeuesd by the coach. In L-stant an individual's award should 
be recommended by the coach and h&ye the approval, of the OoMsittee on Awards 

Awards Committee 



- t *.-r^B"i&;<-nr^ l .<-^v*-^; JV .Ka*- 



icle I 



&• The awards in each spas iall I by a committee 

composed of the Chairman and Sec ?y of the Council, 
the Director of Athletics* the coach and manager of the 

sport. 

fo* The Committee time, after ... proper hearing, 

Lthdr&w the right to we i"* 



: 3&X1, those who have 3 ■ . . ■ ■ 1 requirement of 50 per cent 
of the total number of quarters in a season, pi . in any part of a 
qms ..- t 1 quarter under this As .e. 

Art 2 . 

! Gross Country, those who have scored in at least two dual meets 
out of the season's inns, or tenth better in the Mew England Inter- 

coliegiates, Connecticut Valley Meets? or Yankee Conference. 



- 

bo 

on 



ints in 
indj in 

relay] 






:3Se 



s.. o have broken a G< srcollegiate 

has been competed 
■ 
sarsj 

b. !<Jho have a cored in the iterco.1 Late Athletic 

Association meet, the University Club meet,, the Eastern 
Intercollegiates? or other meets of Like c 

c« vJho have scored a total of eig tits in eith .ring 
or winter meet 

do Who have competed in at least tevo relay races and have 
scored at it two points according to 6c? 

yho have competed in at least one relay race and have 
scored at least five points according to 6c, 



Article 7* 



In Tennis j those who have played in at least one -half of the regularly 
scheduled matches played in a seaso 

Article 8. 

Baseball;, those who have . . minimum requirement equal to one- 
irbh of the total number of inn of the games in a season, 

Exception is made for pitchers on the basis of one-eighth of the total 
number of innings of the games pi - in a season or the equivalent amount 
of relief v?orte. 



:er of t 



f of the 



. 



• mssrscn^' 



The c 'ecozsnend any 

other sen: . L has eon- 

:s of the org tion, for the roval 

of ■ hv&s Col:: i :o be mads only once to 

: 

b„ A student who has . &&y a letter in . her in his 
sophomore or jun ar may noi 2 a letter In the 
In his ye c ,r — a< : ding to Article Ila, 

c The Council shall at all times reserve the . it by two- thirds 
vote to grant the to such other men as they may de« 
deserving^ also to refuse by a two-thirds vote to grant the 
n M" to men who have fulfilled the requirements* 



Article If 



The Director shall maintain an accurate record of all awards isade to 
individuals and a record of all contests shovin. 

■VJU <J 

lason of 
ptain 
. iule (ciatOj opponent, place of Contest* Of of M* score, oppo:vnt*s 

"'■" --""-£?»\ 

Records equaled or bx*oken (event, person, class s date 5 place) 

Se^^onJSXI. 
Irregular Individual or Te&oi Competition 

'iff Jk' 

llo individual or shall compete in any branch of athletics using 
e of 'the University, except with the authority of the Council, and 
such privileges may 'be withdrawn at any time at the discretion of the 
neii* 












■ 



b. ia.ll c 






L 






: 






TO. 






wear 

■ is se/ 
s lass graduate m in 

3 3th:.: 



^ A A \J ,L> w^i *■ 



Ho mm shall be avrardec sr .in any sport v;ho does not rem? 

[' the season of that sport. 

3. 

«■• J . insignia ping in 

each sp- . m. a maroon coat type sweater ■with pocket3. 

b. Women' s Award '- 4 ,f Maroon Old English »M» nay be awarded to not 
over 10 per cent of the junior girls enrolled in Vi.a 

c. Rifle and pistol Awards ~ The Council authorises the h :cy 
Department to award a 4" block [! » Lth crossed ri .he 
rifle team and crossed bols for the piste! m* 

Article A* 



*ft#Mt Ft.'.ttM^'tvaMt 



. Rot more than one sweater shall be awarded to a member of any 
te his college course. 

be All members of athletic teams d€ Section XI shall I 

sweater. 

Section XIV 



phy Room 



on XV 



of S 1 Cups fend Medals 



■Icle 1. 

o- all 

.ce 

d mee 

:.ic 

■."■'. 



. 



The Cou; f Stm o : rsity has approved the 

folio True heir con- 

sideration 

Zoology ?V course an 

oj and animal 

dty of Jteher:-^ 
ach sneh environsac 
Leal factor; :>nsible for the 

i >o erating .: ■ he 

p:. bion of ©. Gd :'S« 

clas; - 

Botany 1, feol^gy l # C] : and. 

Accounting 75 (15 « Administrative Accounting end Controls The pre;. 

and analysis of budgets* to rnal checks, using a . iting 

;hniqu4s an ta, as control devices in business and iv . ry„ 
1 class hour j 2 2-hour laboratory period It, 3- 
Prerequisite. Accounting 25 and 26 * 



Chemistry 4, General Inorganic Chemistry* For students planning to major in 
chemistry or chemical engineering 5 end others who plan to continue the 
udy of this science 3n preparation field of special.! nation . 
The course will include ionic equilibria idatj.cn and reduction; 
electrochemistry:; the descriptive chemistry of some non-metallic and 
metallic elemental the metallurgy of some common metals* and a discussion 
of the production of soiria of the more important inorganic chemicals^ 
>lications of atomic structure and the electronic theory of valence of 
3se sub;' . will be stresse 
2 iec irj- 

2 .?-hc-: clods* Credit, k* 
Pre?:- y 3. 

"7= A consideration of the more 
3 biological : ts rials and processes,. This 
eo : rily for s- not eligible for course 93 

94-* i offered for uate c - b e Net open to chemistry 

. 

3 class periods*- 1 3-hour laboratory period., Credit,, 4o 



on 
si 

Credit, 3> 

of ths 
sat of the 

. ate years o 

P: 

- tin ctures. 

ad re< Field, and.] phasise 

the strict alternate years* 

1 3 hotu. Cred: ; ■ 

Geology 74 (XI)., Principles of Strat 1; » An examination of the 

principles of stratigraphie. co: tiaa and their application "to ths problems 
of the major rock vaults of the United States, Field and laborato: >rk eon- 

■'3 primarily of problems related to the Eastern United States » Given in 
alternate years 

Lass h hour laboratory periods*, Credit,, 3 C 

%a following modifications of the curriculum in Botany are recommended: 

t Kingdom,, bs ?pe& from izrriculuau 

be d e& from the < 
■■s in t Pathology, be dropped from the curriculum* 

r 82 (' ,'s be 

re an< Lgned - -.nigs of 

. the basic principles 
tadude are problems 

. diseonl ;is 

ispeots of 
for ad ites or qualifi' 

2 Ore 






i 

26c { 

eel 
in 

■ ■ . 

con- 
tinue ■ 

3 

Physical Ed biosj s to 

ention in 1 is 

Eta 

riven : ■ be 

ant of Public Saf can 

snal Bed Gross and the Hatic Safety C< 
2 cli Credit, 

Agrono sace and science stude; 

stlons of soils are 
ipeed crobiologioal activities, 

Ge relationships 

: stud 









i 1 i 

;ra&any ■; 



Agr< Laboratoa . narlly fa 

M< s i research ai 

gatiox] --o^g 

of determining exchangeable Ms® >© 

fractionation , tixL many other . ;.s, 

To be taken con with Agrot 

Lstry 30 9 Botany 6 



October, 1950 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TPUSTEES 
February 6, 1951, 10:30 A.M., State House, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brown, 

Cashin, Chandler, Desmond, Mrs. Leach, 
Mrs. McNamara, Orton, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Van Meter, Treasurer Hawley, 
Secretary Burke. 

The meeting having been called to order, the Trustees 
adjourned to the Hotel Statler where the meeting was resumed at 
11:00 A.M. 

It was 

VOTEL: To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last previous meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett appointed the following Nominating 
Committee to recommend officers and committee members for the year 
1950-51: Trustee Whitmore, Chairman, Mrs. McNamara, Mr. Brown. 

President Van Meter presented his annual report on 

activities of the University and, it was 

VOTED: To accept the report with congratulations on 
its excellence. 

President Van Meter said that he had appointed a new 

faculty committee to pass upon candidates for honorary degrees. 

The committee is composed of the Deans of several schools, the 

Secretary of the University and the Alumni Secretary. This 

committee has recommended five persons for honorary degrees at the 

June Commencement. The President presented outlines of the 

accomplishments of the five persons and after discussion, it was 



1617 



Nominating 
Committee 



President's 
Annual Report 



Honorary 

Degrees 



1618 



TRUSTEE 



Military 
Property 



Dormitory 
Boom Bents 



Public Health 
Tuition for 
short courses 



Summer Session 
rates 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To award the following honorary degrees at 
the 1951 Commencement. 

Pobert Frost - Doctor of Literature 

Charles Woolsey Cole - Doctor of Humane Letters 

Francis Joseph Cormier '26 - Doctor of Landscape Architecture 

Stevenson whit comb Fletcher '96 - Doctor of Agriculture 

Sibil L. Smith - Doctor of Science 

Trustee Brett presented recommendations from the Finance 

Committee meeting of February 5 and on the recommendation of the 

committee, it was 

V0TED_: To authorize the Treasurer to increase the 

amount of the present bond covering military 
property loaned by the Federal Government to 
the University from $125,000 to $300,000. 

It was 



VOTED: To approve an annual student rental rate for 

self-liquidating dormitories of $165 effective 
September 1951 and other dormitory rental rates 
as follows: 



State owned dormitories 

Weekly rates for conferences and special 

schools 
Weekly, rates for Summer Session 
Daily rates for students, Alumni, and 4-H 

Club members 
Daily rates for conferences of other groups 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to remit the 
tuition of those students who enroll in 
5-day short courses in Public Health who 
are employees of the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Health. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve the following rates for the 

12-week Summer Session beginning in 1951: 

Tuition, resident students 

Tuition, non-resident undergraduate students 

Tuition, non-resident graduate students 

Poom rent 

Board, 5-day week, Monday-Friday 



$130-1150 
$3-$5 

u 

25 cents 

§1 



$40 
$160 



$7.50 per cr. h 
$4.. 00 per w]|:. 
$9.50 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



VOTED! 



To authorize the Treasurer to cancel the 
notes of six former students which have 
been reported by the Attorney General's 
Department as uncollectible. 



Nello Fiorio 


8/16A3 


$50 


Herbert Gross 


2/17/42 


110 


Herbert Gross 


5/15/^2 


40 


Leonard Rice 


3/17/37 


100 


Paul G. Armitage 


2/13/33 


8 


Paula i . Holmes 


3/13/37 


43.05 



It was 

VOTED : To accept the report of the Treasurer for 
the fiscal year closing June 30, 1950 as 
presented. 

Mrs. Leach, Chairman of the Committee on Extension, re- 
ported for the committee on actions of its February 5 meeting and 
on the recommendation of the committee, it was 

VOTED: To appoint James V. Dayton as Associate Dean 
and Director of the Extension Service in 
Agriculture and Home Economics effective 
February 1, 1951 at annual salary of $7560. 

It was 

VOTED : To appoint H. Sidney Vaughan as State County 

Agent Leader effective March 1, 1951 at annual 
salary of $6060. 

It was 

VOTED : To appoint Dr. Anthony W. Sylstra as Exten- 
sion Poultry Pathologist effective April 1, 
1951 at annual salary of $5760. 

Trustee Desmond presented recommendations from the 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study meeting of February 5 

and on the recommendation of the committee, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following new courses of study: 



1619 



Notes 



Treasurer's 
Annual Report 






Promotion - 
Dayton, James V. 



Appointment of 
Vaughan, H. 
Sidney 



Appointment of 
Sylstra, 
Anthony V. 



1620 



TRUSTEE 



New Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



BOTANY 90 * Insect Transmission of Plant Diseases . - A lecture 
course dealing with the intricate interrelation- 
ships of insects and micro-organism, with 
particular emphasis on the basic role played by 
insects in the inception, distribution, and per- 
petuation of plant diseases. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

BOTANY 88 . Plant Cytogenetics . - The interpretation of 
heredity phenomena in plants in terms of cell 
structure. This study is a correlation of plant 
cytology with genetics and is of applied as well 
as theoretical importance. The lectures encompass 
various aspects of cytogenetics in relation to 
heredity, mutation, evolution, and systematics. 
The laboratory work includes study of physiology, 
structure, and development of plant cells with 
particular emphasis on experimental production of 
polypoids and structural hybrids, 
class hours; 



o 



Graduate School 
regulations 



Master of Sciencle 

degree in: 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engi- 
neering 

Mechanical Engi- 
neering 



1 2-hour laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Zoology 53 (I) • 



Credit, 3' 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 83 (II ). Prevention and Care of Athletic 
Injuries . - Covers the prevention and correction 
of accidents in athletic activities. Use of 
proper personal and field equipment, conditioning 
exercises, the medical examination, and 
therapeutic aids. Includes clinical use of 
physiotherapy equipment, massage, and advanced 
training methods. 
2 class hours. Credit, 2. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve regulations for the Graduate 

School as stated on the accompanying sheets. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve the granting of the degrees 
Master of Science in Civil Engineering, 
Master of Science in Electrical Engineer- 
ing, and Master of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering as soon as appropriate pro- 
grams may be developed and approved by 
the Board of Trustees and as candidates 
complete these programs. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To name Fred J. Sievers, Emeritus Director 
of the Agricultural Experiment Station and 
Emeritus Director of the Graduate School 
effective on his retirement November 30, 1950. 

It was 

VOTE D: To name Willard A. Munson, Emeritus Director 
of the Extension Service in Agriculture and 
Home Economics effective on his retirement 
January 31, 1951* 

It was 

VOTE D: To name John B. Lentz, Emeritus Professor of 

Veterinary Science effective on his retirement 
January 31, 1951. 

It was 

VOTED : To promote Dr. Kenneth L. Bullis from Professor 
to Head of the Department of Veterinary Science 
effective February 1, 1951. 

The Trustees then 

VOTED : To approve and ratify actions of all committees 
of the Board since the date of the last annual 
meeting. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the Chairman to appoint a Committee 
on Facts and Figures with reference to a 
possible Medical School and its location. The 
Chairman appointed the following as members of 
this committee: Trustee Cashin, Chairman, 
Trustees Brett, Carmichael and Taber. 

Trustee Vhitmore reported that, acting for the Committee 

on Buildings and Grounds, he had inspected the new Animal Pathology 

Building in the company of Treasurer Hawley and Superintendent of 

Buildings and Grounds, George Brehm. On his recommendation, it vas 

VOTED : To accept the Animal Pathology Building as 

of January 15, 1951, as substantially complete 
with the understanding that final payment to 
the contractor is subject to completion of all 
work as specified under the contract as certi- 
fied by the architect and approved by the 
Treasurer. 






Sievers, Fred J, 
Emeritus 
Director of the 
Agric. Exp. Sta, 



Munson, Willard 
A.- Emeritus 
Director of the 
Ext. Ser. 



Lentz, John B. 
Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Vet. 
Science 



Promotion of: 
Bullis, Kenneth 
L. 



Ratification of 
Actions 



Committee on 
Facts & Figures 

Medical 
School 



Animal 

Pathology 

Building 



] 1622 



TRUSTEE 



U 



Nominating 
Committee 



Committees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Nominating Committee presented its recommendations 

concerning officers for the year 1951 and membership on committees 

of the Board. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Secretary to cast one ballot 
for the officers and committee members as 
recommended by the Nominating Committee and as 
listed below: 

President, Paul A. Dever 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bartlett 
Secretary, Janes W. Burke 
Treasurer, Robert D. Hawley 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Leonard Carmichael, Chair-man Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 
John J. Desmond William A. Orton 

Clifford C. Hubbard 

Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 

Alden C. Brett, Chairman EniEst Hoftyzer 

Harry D. Brown Mrs. Joseph S. Leach 

John Chandler 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden" C. Brett 
John M. Deely 

Committee on Finance 

John W. Haigis, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
William M. Cashin 



John W. Haigis 
Ralph F. Taber 



Ralph F. Taber 
Philip F. tfMtmore 



Committee on Recognized Student Activities 



John M. Deely, Chairman 
Harry D. Brown 
Ernest Hoftyzer 

Committee on Legislation 

Ralph F. Taber, Chairman 
William M. Cashin 
John M. Deely 

Executive Commit tee 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 

Alden C. Brett 

Mrs. Joseph S. Leach 



Clifford C. Hubbard 
Mrs. Joseph S. Leach 



John W. Haigis 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 



Ralph F. Taber 
Philip F. Whitmore 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 P.M. 



STEE 



i 



frA*u\yXy, t,Ar*yZ> qu~uJ^AA 



Chairman 




Secretary 



3 



1624 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



. 









_ 



c 

idoptii folio 1 
e School. 

o the Graduate d1 ei1 Uted 
on full eti 

A, Requirements fo: • ission on status , 

eheior's Degree or its eqi ! .eait f an ny college 
dty of recognised standing, 

Lai transcript of all previoi - - liege work, 

A 3r of : the head of the department 

applicant aduate major or a letter from his 

tor car circumstances a student 
tatively in courses in tiie University vithoot 
S ' Hied repair, (official trans cript) and 
l-\ letter from the head of the department; oi trie appli- 

es ^ s major or a letter from his preseno em- 
tat» credit 3n until the recuxrements 

ceeDtar.ee by the 6e- mt and by the Admissions Committee 

raduate School Council, Graduate stuo.ents on 
; ie d status viil be held to the earn e s f ^ ar *^ *f^ h 
. cc as Graduate Students on full statu., I* they vash 
duate Student full status they may petition 

Graduate School Council- 

1 s for admission on full status 

3 . * Bachelor's Degree or tb at fr y college or 
university of reci stanaii 

2 An official transcript of all previous college work, 

3. B letter of recommendation from the head of the department 
of the applicant's undergraduate major. 



' _ . 

of 
nscri 

and by tn .ions Coramitt 

story 

■e department co 

roval 

x a specific recuir? 

ad in the Gre 

the Graduate 

aduai bher li full status 

does not : - n ad 

g. j be dismi lure to 

Graduate ' Council r: Board of Trustees that 

iuate ol shall apply 

-■'. 

• 3o c. is required of each iate student in not 

raajor and mi: -its which the student offers 
danced de by-five is the minimum 

any gi cours 

its for Begrees 

It is recomae:.-. : t the basic r s for the Waster of 
Science and the Master of Arts degrees s be as follows: 

A. The earning of thirty credit 

Be Not more than sis credit hours say be transferred from other 
institutions* 






Twenty-one of the thirty credits must be in 'the major field, 



D. Tf a thesis is red, six credits must be earned in courses 

open to gradual aidants only; if a thesis is not offered, twelve 
credits must bo e* in c, Q to graduate students only. 
Not ,nore than ten credits may be earned by means of a thesis- 



>ral, 

,ed 

il 

chool 

fc for a 

3d is entitle *se 

It . ver, report such ions 
School, for purposes aace. 
flitted t, ce of tl 
of the Graduate School for final appraisal in terms of 
basic and si: .rements as indicated 'e. 

Recuirements for the Ph.D.; Credits, at least ninety credits in ail, 
at least sixty of which must be in the major field, at least fifteen in another 
field or fields related to, bit not part of, the major field and not more uian 
thirty in recogni\ the dissertation. 

A preliminary written comprehensive examination in the major and 
minor fields supplemented by an oral examination at the option of the major de- 
partment, both examinations to be conducted ty the department concerned, to be 
passed not later than eight months before the completion of the candidate- s 

In case of failure a candidate may be permitted a second and final cppor- 
nity 5 but net within twelve months. 

Language Reauirement: two languages, foreign to the candidate and 

• ic group s i amended by the major department, Fro- 

fit s ould i • as possible and oe passea prior 

to tl 

Q : the c ust pass a final examination, at 
lea8 t P L'hesis Committee primarily upon, but not 

limited to," the conteir ' candle s dissertation. 

Peel, : lease 30 course credits must have been earned at this 
University. So credit, after 9 years.. 



January 25 ? 1951 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 1, 1951, 11:00 A.M., Butterfield House, Amherst 



PRESENT; 



Chairman Bartlett presiding. 

Trustees Bartlett, Broderick, Brown, Cashin, 
Deely, Desmond, Mrs. Leach, Mrs. McNamara, 
Orton, Taber, President Van Meter, Dean Machmer, 
Registrar Lanphear, Treasurer Hawley, Secretary 
Burke . 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and reading of the 
minutes of the last meeting. 

At the request of Chairman Bartlett, Mr. Lanphear 
presented a report on expected enrollments for the fall of 1951. 
As of this date last year, he said the University had received 
2355 applications for entrance and had accepted 820 students of 
whom 513 were men end 307 women. This year the University has 
received applications for entrance from 2018 students and has accept- 
ed 1039, of whom 611 are men and 428 are women. Last year at this 
date 694- of the applicants had paid deposits. This year 765 have 
paid deposits to date. 

Mr. Lanphear pointed out "that these applicants for the fresh 
man class represent children born in the year 1933 at which time the 
birth rate was low. Since that time the birth rate has increased 
very considerably, especially during the war years. Colleges and 
universities throughout the country would naturally receive fewer 
applications this year regardless of the international situation. 

Mr. Lanphear said that his previous estimate of a total of 
3300 students, including Stockbricge and Graduate School, was made 
before President Truman's recent statement on deferment. It now 
looks as though the University will have very close to 3500 students 
in the fall — about the same as last year. 



Enrollment 



1626 



TRUSTEE 



Fred C. Ellert 
Acting Head of 
Dept. of German 



John B. Newlon 
Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Engi- 
neering, Emeritu 



Refund Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In answer to question from Chairman Bartlett, Mr. Lanphear 
said that the University is using the same standard of admission as 
was used last year. However, last year not all Qualified students 
were taken because of lack of room. This year the University can 
take practically all qualified applicants and in this sense the 
class standard may be somewhat lower. Chairman Bartlett emphasized 
that the Trustees do not wish to lower the entrance requirements or 
the standards of work at the University. It would be better to have 
fewer students than to lower standards to gain numbers. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Fred C. Ellert as Acting Head of 

the Department of German, effective September 1, 
1951. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To name John B. Newlon, Assistant Professor 

of Engineering, Emeritus, effective a.s of the 
date of his retirement, August 31 , 194-9. 

On the recommendation of Treasurer Kawley and of the 



President, it was 

VOTED : To establish the following refund policy to be 

used by the Treasurer in connection with student 
withdrawals during the year. 

1. Prepaid tuition and fees will be refunded to 
students withdrawing as follows: 



a. Within the first two weeks from the 



date of registration 

b. Within the third week 

c. Within the fourth week 

d. Within the fifth week 

e. After fifth week 

2. Prepaid Board - Pro rata refund 

3. Prepaid Room-Rent - no refund 



ao% 

60$S 

A0% 

20% 

no refund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Hawley said that with rising food costs and ex- 
pected salary increases it would be necessary to raise board rates 
beginning next fall to assure sound financial operation of the 
Boarding Hall. After discussion and consideration, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to increase the board 
rate for a 5-day week from the present $8.75 to 
$9.50, effective September 1, 1951, and to 
authorize the Treasurer to increase the day rate 
from the present $1.90 to $2.05, effective 
September 1, 1951. 

On the recommendation of Dean Machmer and President Van- 
Meter , it was 

VOTED ; To approve the following new courses of study. 

Chemical Engineering 77 . Elements of Unit Operations. - For other 
than chemical engineering majors. An introduction to some of the 
unit operations of chemical engineering, especially those which may 
be of use in other process industries. Includes: materials balance 
problems, movement of solids and fluids, filtration, centrifugation, 
extraction, distillation, gas absorption, evaporation, and drying. 
The emphasis is on the principles of the unit operations and the 
types of equipment used, rather than the quantitative aspects and 
the design of eouipment. 
2 class hours. 
1 2-hour computation or laboratory. Credit, 3» 

Music 61 . That the Department of Fine Arts (Music Section) be 
authorized to change the content and re-write the description of 
Music 62, presently called Twentieth Century Music . The course 
content would be changed from an historical study and aural observa- 
tion of music trends since 1900, to a course designed for teachers 
in elementary grades, so that they may acquire practice in certain 
music skills, a knowledge and evaluation of materials and methods, 
concepts of the child's musical growth in the elementary grades. 
The course description would be rewritten as follows: 

Music 61 . Music in the Elementary Grades. - The principles of 
musical development are studied with particular emphasis on presen- 
tation in the classroom situation. Although the course is designed 
primarily for those preparing to teach in the elementary grades, 
others may elect the course upon approval of the instructor. 

Credit, 3 



3 class hours 



;7 



Board Rates 



New Courses 






1628 



TRUSTEE 



Nursing 



R 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Education 60. Elementary School Curriculum. - This course is 
designed to present a picture of the elementary school curriculum 
from the point of view of content and methodology. Emphasis will 
be placed on the unit method and the activity program. 
3 class hours Credit, 3 

Education 6 1. Elementary Reading and Language Arts. - This course 

will discuss and demonstrate emerging methods of preventing and 

remedying reading difficulties. Attention will be given to the 

purposes, methods and materials of oral and written language and 

reading. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3 

Education 6.2. Elementary Arithmetic and Science. - This course will 
discuss and demonstrate accepted methods and materials in the teach- 
ing of those subjects in the intermediate grades. Attention will 
be given to methods of integrating these courses into the total 
program of the school. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3 

Educa tion 63. Principles of Elementary Education. - This course is 
designed to acquaint the student with the aims, organization, 
program, pupil population, etc. of the elementary school and the 
relationship between this level of education and the secondary 
school level which follows. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3 

Dean Machmer spoke of the increasing demand for a program 
in nursing at the University. With the opportunity for more women 
students to attend there is more demand for programs suited to their 
needs. He said that the University now has all the courses required 
for the first two years. The usual procedure is for students to 
attend a college or university for two years and then to transfer to 
a cooperating hospits.1 for two years or two years and a half of 
clinical instruction which is provided by the hospital. The school 
or university then grants the B.S. degree and the candidate also 
becomes a registered nurse. 

Dean Machmer said that the hospitals at Greenfield, 
flkbrthampton, Holyoke, and Springfield have all requested the oppor- 
tunity to cooperate with the University in nurses training. The only 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



item needed before the University can go ahead with this program is 
a position, probably of Professor, so that a Supervisor may be em- 
ployed to coordinate the University program with that of cooperating 
hospitals and to supervise the girls taking this curriculum. 
After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to establish a 
curriculum in nursing and to seek ways and 
means of obtaining a position so that a super- 
visor may be employed. 

Treasurer Hawley presented the attached comments on the re- 
port of the Auditor for the period October 31, 194-9 - October 31 > 
1950. He said that the main concern of an audit is to check on the 
accuracy of records, cash, securities and accounts. All these have 
been verified completely. It was 

VOTED : To make record of the fact that the Trustees 
have received the report of the Auditor for 
the year ending October 31 j 1950, have examined 
his comments, have accepted the comments of the 
Treasurer, and have placed these documents on 
record. 

Chairman Bartlett said that the Trustees should have an 
up-to-date report from the Finance Committee on ■ the status of Endow- 
ment Funds and of the scholarship aid which students receive from 
Trust Funds. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To direct the Secretary to notify the Chairman 
of the Finance Committee of the desire of the 
Board for an up-to-date report on the use of 
the Trust Funds, particularly as they help in the 
activities of the students. President Van Meter 
suggested that Dean Machmer prepare certain informa- 
tion on scholarships for the use of the Finance 
Committee. 



Auditor's 
Report 



Endowment 
Funds 



Trust Funds 



1630 



TRUSTEE 



Hampshire Inter- 
Library Center, 
Inc. 



Library Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Deely reviewed the highlights of the first meet- 
ing of the new Trustee Committee on Recognized Student Activities. 
He said that he was most enthusiastic about the possibilities of 
greater understanding among Trustees, Administration and students. 
Mrs. Leach said that she was pleased with the opportunity which 
this Committee is affording for the Trustees to meet directly with 
the students to learn of their problems and to share more directly 
in the solution of them. She said that she was particularly pleased 
with the emphasis given in the first meeting of the Committee to 
the activities of women students. She pointed out that the Women's 
Advisory Council of the University is celebrating its 30th birthday 
in May. This group has been active in sponsoring programs for vomer 
at the University and has usually had women students at its meetings 

Mr. Brown said that he had enjoyed the first meeting of 
the Committee on Recognized Student Activities and he felt that 
further meetings would result in better understanding on the part 
of the students of the services which the Trustees are attempting 
to provide for them. 



Chairman Bartlett said that the Board appreciates the 
efforts of this new Committee and hopes that there will be 
additional meetings in the future. 

President Van Meter said that the neighboring colleges of 
Smith, Amherst, and Mount Holyoke are planning to establish a 
library center where little-used books and pamphlets may be filed 
in common. In this way each college will save library space and 
save funds by the avoidance of duplication on little-used items. 
The University has been invited to participate in the arrangement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

but because of state regulations has not found it possible to 
help in the initial stages of the venture. However, President Van 
Meter has agreed, personally, to be one of the incorporators of the 
Hampshire Inter— Library Center, Inc. Mount Holyoke is providing 
the tower of its new library as the deposit center. The President 
hopes that some day the University may use the center. He recom- 
mended no action by the Trustees at the present time. 

Trustee Cashin reported for the Committee on Facts and 
Figures with reference to a possible medical school and its loca- 
tion. He said that the Committee is not ready for a formal report, 
that it has been meeting and assembling facts. So far, the Committe 
is impressed with the very heavy cost of building and maintaining a 
medical school. California has just spent fifty million dollars for 
the development of a new medical school in Los Angeles. At the 
present time there are 28,000 pre-medical students at the various 
colleges and universities of the country. There will be 7200 open- 
ings for them in the 79 medical schools. 

Chairman Bartlett congratulated the Committee for the work 
which it has been doing and emphasized the need for the Trustees 
to be informed in this matter. 

Trustee Taber reported on the efforts of his Committee to 

increase the salary of the President. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To authorize and direct the Committee to file a 
bill with the next Legislature calling for a 
salary for the President of the University of 
not less than $15,000. 



O 



Medical 
School 



President 
salary of 



1632 



TRUSTEE 



Power Plant 



Dining 
Commons 



Baker House 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Havley reported briefly on the progress of 
the budget for the year beginning July 1, 1951. He said that in 
general no increases would be granted under any of the items except 
for necessary salary costs. 

He reported that the new Power Plant is completed and in 
operation; that the turbine house for the new generator has yet to 
be constructed at an estimated cost of PU0,000. This work has been 
delayed because of the slowness of the architect in delivering plans, 
Work has begun on a $180,000 project for improved utility lines in 
certain sections of the campus. Plans are completed for an isola- 
tion building to be used in connection with the newly-completed 
animal disease building. Ninety thousand dollars was provided for 
this building but it will cost approximately $115,000. It is ex- 
pected that the Public Building Commission will provide the 
additional funds. 

Mr. Hawley reported also that the plans have been com- 
pleted and approved by the Trustee Committee on Buildings & Grounds 
for the new Dining Hall. Two hundred sixty-five thousand dollars of 
additional funds are needed to construct this building and this 
item is requested in the present budget. 

It was 

VOTED: To meet on Wednesday, June 27, in Boston to 
consider the budget for the year beginning 
July 1, 1952. 

• President Van Meter reported on plans for the dedica- 
tion of the double-sized dormitory to the memory of former President 
Baker. After discussion, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To name the new double-sized dormitory, 
Hugh Potter Baker House, and to approve 
the dedication of this building on Saturday, 
June 2, 1951. 

It was 

VOTED : To change the date of the sabbatical leave 
granted to Dr. Reuben E. Trippensee to six 
months beginning in February of 1952 and to 
change the date of sabbatical leave granted 
to Miss Ruth Mclntire to six months during 
the year beginning September 1, 1951 > with 
the understanding that such leaves may not be 
taken if sabbatical leaves are prohibited by 
the Legislature. 

Secretary Burke reported on the results of the recent 
personnel survey of the University which was made by the State 
Division of Personnel & Standardization. The Division of Personnel 
has been making surveys of each of the state institutions to acquire 
background material against which future budget recommendations will 
be considered. The survey at the University was made last fall and 
the results have just been released to the University. A consider- 
able number of changes are recommended, many of them in support of 
budget askings of the Trustees. The University disagrees with cer- 
tain of the proposals and will have the opportunity to state its 
disagreement before the report is submitted to the Legislature by the 
Personnel Division. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To approve the architect's plans for the new 

Boarding Hall as submitted and to authorize the 
President and Treasurer to proceed toward the 
construction of the building. 



6~\ t> 



'-> 



Reuben E. 
Trippensee - 
sabbatical lease 

Ruth Mclntire - 
sabbatical leave 



Dining Commons 



TRUSTEE 



Turbine House 



Public Health 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To approve the outline plan for the turbine 

house addition and to authorize the President 
' and Treasurer to approve detailed plans based 
on this outline. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To approve the site along Stockbridge Road to 
the north and west of Marshall Hall for the 
new Public Health Building. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4*00 P.M. 



Secretary 



Chairman 








1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Comments on Report of Auditor for Period 
October 31, 19^9 to October 31, 1950 

Representatives of the State Auditor began their examination of 
the financial records of the University on October 31, 1950, and com~ 
pleted their investigation at the end of February • They have presented 
a comprehensive report which, In general, verifies the records of the 
University* Beginning on Page k, there are notes and comments which I 
should like to explain as follows ; 

Cas h Over and Short 

The variation in cash Is due primarily to the fact that we have 
only one cashier and a large volume of mixed business involving both 
receiving and paying., For several years, we have requested an additional 
position in order to differentiate the cashier functions with the opera- 
tion of a receiving window and a paying window» We believe that this is 
the solution to this problem* In view of our total receipts of nearly 
two million dollars a year, the variance referred to by the Auditor does 
not seem unduly large * 

Advance Mongx 

The amount of $1,110.56 advanced to members of the staff to cover 
official travel, which the report Indicates was outstanding on October 
31, 1950, was the total of advances made to eleven people,, While it 
exoeeded the total in the Advance Fund for Travel as indicated, there 
were ample funds in the total Advance Fund to cover this and our other 
requirements. However, we should restrict travel advances to the amount 
available in the travel fund Itself and Intend to do so* 

Boarding Hall Materials and Supplies 

The net shortage in our Boarding Hall Materials and Supplies 
Inventory which had to be adjusted during the year was $872*17. This 
does not seem excessive in view of an average Inventory of $30,000 and 
total purchases of $265, 000* We are doing all that we can to keep these 
variances at a minimum* It is unavoidable that there will be some 
discrepancies * 

With regard to the Suspense Accounts, we follow the practices 
prescribed by the State Comptroller 

Personnel Records and Payroll Disbursements 

The matter referred to as the adjustment of pay to temporary 
employees has now been completed and all adjustments made as authorized 
by the State Division of Personnel and the University Personnel Office* 



ther 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOATS OF TRUSTEES 



UNIVERSITY OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 



Commencement 
mi 



1863 - Eighty-eighth Year - 1951 



1635 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



635 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



:or 



Eighty-First 
Commencement 



<# 



LIBRARY LAWN 

(In case of rain the exercises will be held in the Curry S. Hicks 
Physical Education Building) 

Sunday, June 3, 1951, at 3:30 P. M. 



Degrees 



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1635 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SEMI-AHNUAL MEETING OF BOAT® OF TRUSTEES 



Program 



PROCESSIONAL 



INVOCATION 



The Reverend Harold W. Curtis, Class of 1913 
First Congregational Church 
Greenfield, Massachusetts 



ADDRESS 



Charles Woolsey Cole, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D. 

President of Amherst College 



CONFERRING OF DEGREES 



President Ralph A. Van Meter, Ph.D., LL.D. 



RECESSIONAL 



Organist: Doric Alviani, Associate Professor of Music 



( The audience is requested to remain standing 
while the academic procession withdraws.) 



.or 



'ing 



ng 
ng 



Degrees 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Robert Thomas Grimley 



Saul Kaufman Bloch 
Paul Charles Colodny 
Jeremiah Thomas Herlihy 
Barbara Anne Kranich 



Swnma Cum Laude 

James Castle Robinson 

Magna Cum Laude 

Rachel Leah Liner 
*Arthur Motta 
Richard Renzo Rescia 



Cum Laude 



fri iv e 



tions 



Harold Monroe Blanchard 

Leo Arthur Cohen 

Philip John Dean 

Joan France 

Justin Ephraim Green 

lohn Sylvester Hall 



Herbert Abrams 
Malcolm Standish Aldrich 
Boyd Allen, Jr. 
Martin Leo Anderson 
Winthrop Temple Anderson 
Joseph Angelini 
George Edward Auclair 
Donald Lee Babbin 
Joan Lucy Baginski 
James Baird 

Lewis Knowlton Baldwin 
Janet Alice Ball 
Albert Vincent Barbadora 
Arnold Abraham Barr 
Russell Henshaw Beaumont 
Roscoe Howe Bemis 
Melvin Nathan Blake 
Rosemary Ann Blanciforti 
Charles Leon Blauer 
Robert Sumner Bond 



Rite 



William John Harrington 
Walter Harold Heintz 
Phillips Russell Jones 
Charles Augustus Kiddy 
Jean Ann Lindsay 
*Thomas James O'Brien 
Lawrence Eugene Shearer, Jr. 



Albert Joseph Boris 

Richard Lloyd Boynton 

Mary Agnes Breen 

Marjorie Mae Briand 

Robert Sill Brigham 

Kathleen Mary Buckley 

Donald John Buss 

Edgar Timothy Canty, Jr. 

James Guy Cassani, Jr. 

James Warren Chadwick, Jr. 
*Edwin Hammond Chandler 
*Francis Gerald Ciarfella 

Frank John Cieboter 

Gerald Kenneth Clark 

Regina Lawlor Coffey 

Joan Cole 

Jeanne Marie Collins 
*Charles Bernard Conlin 

Alan Cornell 

Donald Francis Costello 



* As of the Class of 1950 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOAPJD OF TRUSTEES 



O 



Francis Richard Crane 

*Edward Foster Creed 
Richard Cronin 
Warren Charles Curran 
Walter Adam Czelusniak 

*Howard Earl Daniels 
Peter Andrew D'Arrigo 
Ruth Smith Davenport 
Ernest John Davis 
Frederic William Davis, Jr. 
Philip Sidney Day 
Barbara Ann Dean 
Mary Joan Dellea 
Irving Everett Demoranville 
Marilyn Bertha Derby 
Cyril Joseph Desautels 
Edwin Eugene Devine 

*Gordon Parker DeWolf, Jr. 
Charles Baker Dill 
Francis Gerald Driscoll 
William A. Edwards 
Andrew K. Eliopoulos 
Robert Knowlton Ellis 
John Robert Estelle 
Donald Robert Fairman 
Norman Charles Farrar 
Louise Evelyn Feldman 
Edna Mary Firmenich 
Laurence Bertram Ford, Jr. 
Dorothy Ann Fortin 
Donald Foster 
Beverly Elaine Fournier 
Barbara France 
Gordon Henry Francis 
James Allyn Freed 
Raymond Roy Gagnon 
Pauline Sanderson Gast 

**John James Georgian 
Paul Brewster Gilman, Jr. 
Richard Roberts Gleason 
Herman Jack Gordon 
Bradford Graton Gould 
David Stuart Gould 
Donald Milton Gray 
James Green, Jr. 



** As of the Class of 1949 
* As of the Class of 1950 



Norman Ezra Greenspan 

Robert Burnam Gretter 

Frank Alexander Grosso 

Bruce Stewart Gullion 

James J. Guthrie 

Ernest Scovell Hamilton 

Fred Joseph Hampson 

Robert Carl Hansen 

John Thomas Harmon 

John Oliver Hart 

Frances Stegner Hatch 

Harold Phelps Hatch 

Alfred Lincoln Hawkes 

Albert John Healey 

Edward Maurice Heffernan 

William J. Hendry, Jr. 

Thomas James Henneberry 

Robert Cummings Heustis 

David Lawrence Higgins, Jr. 

Albert Joseph Hodgess 

Nancy Faye Hoffman 

Paul Edward Holmes 

Harry Elmer Hopkins 

F. Lucile Howe 

Daniel Patrick Hurld, Jr. 

Herbert Colby Hutchings, Jr. 

Albert Leonard Iampietro 

Andrew Philip Iosue 

William Leonard Ives 

George Belding Jackson 

Leonard Joseph Janofsky 

Howard Andrew Jessop 

Albert Rudolph Johnson 

Ruth Marie Johnson 

Winslow Gray Johnson 

Robert Andrew Johnston, Jr. 

James Kendall Jones 

Gurson Irving Kantor 

Samuel Kaplan 
*Adam Stanley Kasica 

John Joseph Keane 

Mary Patricia Kearns 
*Robert C. Kendall 

Carolyn Helen Kendrow 
* Raymond Arnold Kinmonth, Jr. 



for 



ving 



ng 
ng 



Degrees 






Univerr 

for te 



v -«. '. 



ment Funds, 
on co line 



^DHsGHP 



Ralph Howard Kinsler 
Suzanne Carpenter Knapp 
George Koolian 
Edward Chester Kossakoski 
Anthony William Kotula 
Arnold John Kunefsky 
Nellie Kathryn Kwasnik 
Joan Aline Labarre 
Richard Peter LaLiberte 
Rauno Andrew Lampi 
Ruth Edna Landstrom 
Robert Douglas Law 
Albert Lees, Jr. 
William Ernst Leidt, Jr. 
William Eugene Leinonen 
William Charles Less 
Robert Edward Leventhal 
Edward Lewis Lichtenstein 
Douglas John Loveridge 
William Louis Luchini 
John Philip Lukens 
Sidney Mackler 

Charles Newcomb MacNear, Jr. 
Waldense David Malouf 
Manuel Mandell 
David Brownell Mann 
Rex Francis Marganti 
Carol Ellyn Martin 
Albert Stephen Marulli 
Ruth Marian Marvel 
Agnes Josephine Therese McDonough 
Warren Bradford McGranahan 
Alfred Willard McKinstry 
John Fairfield McMaster 
*Florence Eleanor Mellor 
Charles Peter Merhib 
Robert Warren Merrick 
Fredrick William Meyer 
Christine Micka 
Melvjn Jerome MUender 
Frank Apsey Miller, Jr. 
Alan Thompson Monroe 
Evelyn Altha Morgan 
Anne Joan Moriarty 
Robert William Murray 



George Nadison 

Harold Otis Nickerson 

Richard Elmer Nilsson 

Alexander Paul Norskey 

Barbara Elizabeth Nyren 

Charles Wilbur Nystrom 

James Joseph O'Connell 

Joann Mary O'Rourke 

Dexter Holt Osgood 

Harold Arne Ostman 

Stephen Ovian 

Natalie Alice Palk 

Richard Albert Pare 

Cathryn Elinor Peck 

Franklin Haskins Perkins 

David McClure Peters 

Mitchell Robert Peters 

John William Peterson 

David Lewis Pierce 

Arnold Lawrence Pinto 

Thayne Robbins Pipes 

Abraham Polonsky 

Richard Metcalf Prouty 

Joseph Lincoln Putnam 

Richard John Quinton 

Charles Nelson Reynolds, Jr. 

Marjorie E. Rice 

Virginia Bennett Roaf 

Gilbert Parker Robery 

John Henry Phillips Rodda, III 

Robert Joseph Ross 

Philip George Roth 

Frederick Lawrence Roy, Jr. 
*Louis Hooker Ruggles 

Shirley B. Saphirstein 

Richard Lee Saunders 

Everett Henry Scannell, Jr. 

Arthur Ivis-on Schofield 

Michael Thomas Sears 

Russell Lawson Sears, Jr. 

Russell Worster Shaw 

Claire Isabel Shaylor 

Mary Catherine Shea 

William John Shelvey 
*John Joseph Shugrue 



* As of the Class of 1950 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOAPJO OF TRUSTEES 



8 ~> 



Alan Morton Shuman 

Lloyd Edward Sinclair 

Adela Louise Charlotte Skipton 

Carrie Frances Smith 

Janet Lorraine Smith 

Vitie Joseph Stakun 

Raymond John Stankus 

William Chandler Starkweather 

Donald Robert Stowe 

Patricia Ann Stratton 

Marjorie Anne Sullivan 

Kenneth Ingram Sutherland 

Frank Nelson Syner 

Francis Stanley Szpak 

James Stephen Taylor 

Selwyn Hart Taylor 

Vernon Theodore Thomas 

Roger Bradstreet Thompson 

Alphonse Charles Turcotte 

Elizabeth Johanna Jacoba VanderPol 

Richard Hart Vara 



Patricia Ann Walsh 
John James Ware 
James Joseph Warren, Jr. 
Robert Bicknell Warren 
Prudence Waugh 
Donald Edward Weidhaas 
Henry Curtis Wendler 
Marilyn Whipple 
Herbert Wiener 
Bronislaw Paul Wisnewski 
Helena Theresa Wolkowicz 
Robert Craig Wood 
Dorothy Marie Woodhams 
Jean Gertrude Wormuth 
Florence Caroline Wright 
Francis Stuart Wright 
Kenneth F. Yee 
Charles Yergatian 
George William Yonker, Jr. 
David Lincoln Young 



for 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Degrees 



Daniel Edward Diamond 
Eugene Isenberg 



George Frederick Cliche 
Edward Leonard Gerstein 



William Max Abramson 
Elizabeth Acheson 
Mary Kathryn Akey 
Muriel Aldrich 
Harry Everett Aliengena 
'Sarkis Almoyan 
Robert Potter Andersen 
Richard Addison Andrews 
Charles Falck Bamford 
Stanley Barron 



Magna Cum Laude 

Priscilla Ann Parsons 
Jean Elizabeth Small 
Raymond Pitman Stone 

Cum Laude 

Jane McElroy 

*Frank William McCaughey 
C. Charles Stephano 



?ing 



rig 
ng 



Rite 



Jane Terese Bartley 
Paul Valois Beauvais 
Pauline Claire Beauvais 
Roderick Graham Bell 
John Charles Belville 
Shepard Bloomfield 
Norman David Bornstein 
Barbara Lewis Brayman 
"Donald Hawkes Bridgman 
Jacob Irving Brody 



* As of the Class of 1950 



univerf 
for te, 

'innl 



it ion s 
;ion * 






m> 



Edgar Holt Buck, Jr. 

Ruth Dorothy Camann 

Stephen Joseph Patrick Cassidy 

Alice Chorebanian 

Herbert Martin Clayton 

Charles William Cloutier 

John Francis Cody, Jr. 

Arnold Marvin Cohen 

Jacqueline Mona Cohen 

Ruth Ann Cohen 

Arthur Cole 

William Roswell Cole, Jr. 

David Ignatius Corbut 

Alexander David Cumming 

Donald William Curtis 

Louise Harriett Gushing 

Kenneth Alden Cutting 
* Anthony Richard DeAgazio 

Gerald Joseph Doherty 

Anthony Dougas 
*Thomas Donald Dunn 

Robert Joseph Dunton 
*Philip Quigley Dwyer 

Herbert Eckhardt, Jr. 

Ann Newhold Elder 

Carl Euclide Ellery 

Charles Vincent Fay 

Grace Isabel Feener 

Daniel Drake Field 

Francis Joseph Flanagan 

George Henry Flynn 

Martin Francis Flynn 

Mario John Fortunato 

Donald Ragnar Foss 

Irene Rachel Frank 

Lydia Ann French 

Paul Joseph Furlani 

Philip Goldman 

Roger Allyn Goodspeed 

Albert Charles Governor 

John Maclean, Grant, Jr. 

Melvin Harold Grant 

James Marvin Greenberg 
*Norman Russell Hallowell 

Betty Eleanor Hansen 
*Willis Knox Hart 



Edward Francis Hession 
Henry Louis Hmieleski 
Carol Ernestine Hooker 
Alan Francis Hunter 
Kenneth Joseph Jackson 
Donald Carbee Jacques 
Nancy Ann Jodrey 
Robert Francis Jcrdon 
Edna Louise Joslin 
William Stephen Kalinowski 
Lillian Karas 
Walter Thomas Kenney, Jr. 

*Francis Martin Killilea 

*Robert Joseph Koshinsky 
M. Gail Kuhns 
Ronaid A. Lagasse 
Paul Anthony Lane 
Raymond Sargent Lane 
Barbara L. Lappin 

*Robert Leavitt 
Vincent Charles Leccese 
Norman Hubbard Lee 
Dorothy Betty Lipnick 
Lawrence Litman 
Kenneth William Lovejoy 
*Francis Paul Lucier 
Kenneth Frank Mailloux 
Jeannette Harris Malouf 
James Manuel, Jr. 

*Guy Joseph Margi 
Harold John Markarian 

*Robert James Mattson 
Edward Francis McCauley 

*Robert William McMahon 
F rancis M a inland McManus 
Joseph Robert McNamara 
William Joseph McNamara 

*Janice Ellsas Meyer 
Mildred Anne Mik 
Norma Ruth Miller 
Mary Jean Minehan 
Lillian R. Moldaw 

*Leroy Milton Morell 
Rena Laura Murphy 
Dana Winston Nahigyan 
Edward Francis Newman, Jr. 



* As of the Class of 1950 



•mm 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



1635 



Christine Mary Noiseux 

*William John O'Brien 
Francis James O'Connell 
Robert Leo O'Connor 
Alice Mary O'Donnell 
David Ignatius O'Grady 
Frank Robert O'Keefe, Jr. 

*Albert John Owens, Jr. 
Aldrick Alonzo Palmer 
Patricia Lenart Papouschek 
Robert Francis Paul 
Harlow Edward Pendleton 
Irene Pernioia 

Constance Elizabeth Petroski 
Leonard Pollard, Jr. 
James Michael Powers 
Edward Cobb Purrington, Jr. 
Jeanne Marie Rapoza 
William Allan Ratner 
Allan Robbins 
Sally Ruth Rosenbloom 
Arthur Kimball Ross, Jr. 
Robert Marshall Rossman 
Allen Rubin 
William George Savard 
Jeanne Edna Sawdey 
Ruth Martha Schorer 
Burton Abraham Shaker 
Sylvia Foster Shaw 
James Murdoch Shevis 
Sophia Shmulsky 
Roy Ewan Sievwright 



* As of the Class of 1950 



h . i 



Phyllis Leona Silin 

Lionel Cunha Silva 
*IsraeI Bernard Smith 

Dianne Beatrice Speed 

James J. Stapleton 

Joan Kaye Stern 

Ervin Sidney Stockwell, 3rd 

Nancy Ann Streeter 

Paul Kimball Swanson 

John David Swymer 

Henry Boniface Szymanowicz 

Donald Owen Scott Taggart 

Charles Wendell Talcott 

Richard Falck Tarshus 

David Zalman Tavel 

Ruthe Frances Toner 

Dana Clark Torrey 
*Raymond George Trombley 
*William John Troy 

James John Turco 

Arthur Francis VanWart 

John Henry Volin 

Beryl Fritz Waldman 
*Alverne Lawrence Webster 

Francis Myron Whitaker fjf 

Carlisle Laportaille Wilkey 

Frank Tadeusz Wojcik 

Melvin Herbert Wolf 

Ann Gertrude Wolper 

Donald Guilford Wood,? Jr. 

Arlene Anne Zatyrka 



for 



Degrees 



-ing 



ng 



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for ter 

Tin'] 



- • '■ 



It ion e 

ent Fund;. 

on 



GHP 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Cum Laude 
Seymour Morton Frankel 



Rite 



Warren Jay Alberts 
Glenn Howard Alletson 
Rene Ernest Joseph Barrieau 
Raymond Robert Beaulac 

*Earle Burke, Jr. 
Edmund Paul Burke 
Donald Bunton Calkins 
John Coolidge, Jr. 
Samuel Irving Couture 
James Martin Curran 
Irving Mitchell Diamond 
Albert Harry Donigian 
John Little Anthony Donovan 
Joseph Henry Durant 
Melvin Allen Dyson 
Thomas Nelson Embler 
Charles Sturtevant Fairburn 
Henry John Fellows 
Edmund John Frydryk 
Charles Maxwell Goller 
John Chester Green 
David Gilman Haeger 
Franklin Allen Handy 
James Francis Hayden 
Patrick Francis Henaghan 
John Ken worthy Henshall 
Edmond Davis Hermes 
Richard Constantine Karis 

*James Wallace Kehoe 
James Martin Kelly 
Austin William King, Jr. 
Frederic Pelham Lahey 
Wayne Archibald Langill 
Chester Libucha 



Janice Violet Luther 

Alfred Henry Mackowski 

Joseph Chester Mattuski 

John McKim 

Harold Arthur McManus 
*Raymond Phillip Metzger 

William John Morrison 

John James Needham 

John Theodore Nichols, Jr. 

Reginald Lee Nickerson 

Bernard Noymer 

John Dennis O'Leary 

Francis Anthony Pado 

Malcolm Thomas Payne, Jr. 

Gerald Herbert Popkin 

Mark Edward Powers 

Edna May Price 

Donald Harrison Quimby 
*Gerald Carlton Seidenberg 

Martin Selig 

Varick Marcy Smith 

Joseph Bernard Stone 

Seymour Stone 

John Joseph Sullivan 
*Richard Perry Symmes 

Ralph Talanian 

William Fredson Thacher, Jr. 

Willard Dickson Voigt 

Carl Walter Walczak 

George Riordan Webber, Jr. 

Theodore Leon Weiner 

Jack Weiss 

Frank John Weisse 

George R. Wezniak 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERII 



Albert Joseph Bergeron, Jr. 
Richard S. Howland 



Albert Winer 



Roman John Misiaszek 
Chester Stanley Prucnal 



* As of Class of 1950 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



• /-> C»r»J tmVi^-nO'l' 



1635 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



Robert John Bussolari 



Magna Cum Laude 

William Conweli Gaitenby 



Rite 



Alfred Michael Boski 
Donald Irving Christensen 
Salvatore Leonard Cianculli 
William Edward Driscoll 
James Halsey Elwell 



John Federico 
Benedict Frederick Galas 
Alfred Conrad Raffa 
Richard Albert Shaw 
Louis John Skarbek 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Cum Laude 



Richard Aloyius Beauvais 
Edward Norman Chapdelaine 



Anthony Francis Gaudy, Jr. 
Parker Winslow Welch 



Rite 



Ralph Harold Amero 
Joseph Frank Barone 
David Lyle Brown 
Herbert Elwin Bushee 
Robert Joseph Byrne 
Joseph Francis Canavan 
Edward Maynard Caton, Jr. 
George Cheneas 
William Robert Colton 
Vito Peter Dauyotas 
Fiorentino Joseph DiGrappa 
Dominic John Dinoia 



William Joseph Farrell 
Robert Fredrick Fedel 

*Karel Jacobs 
Gilbert Thomas Joly 
Malcolm Wilson King 
Robert Samuel Larsen 
Kenneth Andrew LeClair 
James Thomas McDonough 
George Francis McGeough 

Thomas Andrew McManus 
Robert Louis McWilliams 

*Soterios George Scarmeas 
Irving G. Wickman, Jr. 



* As of Class of 1950 



for 



Degrees 



ring 



ng 

ng 









CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Summa Cum Laude 
Allan John Bamford 



Arthur Winthrop Barstow 



Cum Laude 



Alexander Skopetz 



Rite 



for t 



itlons of pre 



Erwin Myer Allen 
Asadoor Aslanian 
Alvan T. Bazer 
Paul Butler 

♦Frederick Albert Carlson 
Donald Francis Connors 
George Edward Cudworth 

*George Edward Daviau 
William John Dobias 
Joseph Arnold Dombrowski 
Willard James Flynn 
Clifford John Forster, Jr. 
William Francis Ganey 
Robert Arthur Gingras 
Walter J. Gnacek 
Joseph Michael Griffin 
Alden Hodgkins Howard 
Charles Francis Kelliher 



*Joseph Martin Lambert 

Adrian Wilfred Latendresse 

Richard Fuller Leach 

Melvin Levine 

Robert Nelson McDonald 
*Paul Apostles Michitson k 

John Pappas^^ faj^rij Jlcap * 
*Joseph Armand Pelletier Q 

Wallace Frank Powers, Jr. 

Giustino U. Reppucci 

John Alfred Metcalf Smith 

Harry Star 

Ralph A. VonKamecke 

Joseph Warshawsky 

William Hugh Wave 

Augustine Joseph Welling 

Warren Alan Williams y * ^ 



4^C4\^fO Jt**-&4 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Summa Cum Laude 
George Albert Bucci 



Magna Cum Laude 
Damon Dodge Phinney 

Cum Laude 



Edward Kenneth Bullock 



*Sherman Harris Rosenthal 



*As of the Class of 1950 



1635 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-AiSiMJAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Rite 



^ <"» f» J A^^Vix^-v-wo-i" 



Albert Calvin Adams 
Frederick Erwin Allen 
John James Anestis 
Wilbur Edmund Bassett 
George Henry Bornheim 
Robert Roland Carpenter 
Walter Stanley Chochrek 
Emil Turbak Cobb 

*William Miles Collins 
William Costa 
Eugene Augustine Costanza 
Michael Carmen Damiano 
Wilbur Edgar Downing 
Alexander Benjamin Duncan 
Albert Eng 

Philip George Facey^Jr. 
Leonard Finn 

*John Joseph Flana 
George Lincoln Gallerani 
Lawrence Eames Gard 
Francis Thomas Grabauskas 
Robert Judkins Hall 




Richard Erwin Hanson 
Raymond William Hegarty 
James Parker Heslin 
Daniel Horn, Jr. 
John Russell Hull 
Francis Melvin Kavanagh 
*Robert Hampstcn Kelly 
John Francis Kowinski 
Russell Leonard Lawson 
Melvin Joseph Lederman 
Robert Pomeroy Lotreck 
Joseph Robert Mayer 
Bernard Robert McHugh 
*Eugene Joseph McKenna 
Donald Gordon McLean 
(/) *v j Andrew George Miller 

A-jfVLtr*} 3A&-4i4.~£ i <* James Saul Pariseau 

Robert Henry Robertson, Jr. 
Wendell Arthur Rockwood 
Allan Richard Smith 
Edward Joseph Tobiasz 
Hyman Solomon Traiger 
John Herbert Tupper 



for 



Degrees 



John Francis Webber 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 



Robert L. Anderson 
James Laurence Collins 
Patrick Joseph Griffin 



Roger Wallace Lawrence 
Charles George Simmons 
Richard James White 



-ing 



lg 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Zane Aubrey Bower 
Leroy Eugene Egelhoff 



Brewster Weston Fuller 
Paul Serex 



* As of the Class of 1950 






CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 



v '-■• I „: 



for t 



•or. 



Joseph M. Bernard 
Robert Edmund Bertram 
Richard H. Best 
Robert W. Bibeau 
Arnold E. Binder 
Donald W. Bliss 
Willard Gordon Bloodgood 
Edward A. Botan 
Donald Bigelow Bradley 
Carl David Brandt 
John A. Brickett 
Carlton A. Bricknell 
Anthony R. Briggs 
Francis J. Brown 
Roberta M. Burkhardt 
Robert Ezra Canning 
Arthur Oreste Castraberti 
Humberto Ceballo-Padilla 
Alfred B. Chaet 
Diptiman Chakravarti 
Murray Cooper 
Henry A. Costantino 
Mary Louise Cote 
Louis James Creed 
Anna H. Cronin 
Stanley Lawrence Curtis 
Robert V. Decareau 
William H. Deitz 
William A. Delaney 
Llewellyn L. Derby 
Myrtle I. Derby 
Richard E. Desjarlais 
James Hadley Dietz 
James L. Dinsmore 
Claude Elmer Douglas 
Edwin E. Drewniak 
Henry F. Drewniany 
Ann V. Dubour 
Leo J. Dymerski 
Ray C. Ellis 
George F. Ensworth 



Walter C. Flanders 
Ralph T. Florio 
Thomas Walton Fox 
William T. Geenty, Jr. 
Charles J. Gerry 
Sheldon Sumner Goldberg 
Harold Gorfien 
John H. Graham 
Joseph Gruber 
Mott P. Guhse 
Mary V. Harrington 
Malcolm C. Henry 
Angela D. Holmes 
Roger Walter Hunt 
M. Farid Husny Hussein 
Adolph J. Jakobek 
Hugo Jaranback 
William Bradford Johnson 
Frederick L. Jones 
Wesley Robert Jones 
Leila S. Knapp 
Gaston G. Kohn 
Jean L. Leclerc 
Richard Henry Lee 
Jean Paul Lemay 
Howard S. Leopold 
Samuel Liberman 
Irving I. Litman 
Gideon Eleazar Livingston 
Edward John McGrath, Jr. 
Walter B. MacGrath 
John Manlich, Jr. 
Thomas J. Mannix 
James R. Marshall 
Anthony J. Matuszko 
Stevenson Moore III 
M. Keith Nadel 
Edward Naroian 
Nestor Nicholeris 
Edward W. Pepyne 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



1635 



Waymand T. Peterson 
Arthur James Poivan 
Ernest F. Romano 
Franklin D. Rollins 
Aaron Rosen field 
Philip Ross 

David William Sanshuck 
Melvin Santer 
Bernard Schwab 
Harold Russell Shaw 
Timothy Joseph Sheehan 
Allen Silbergleit 
Russell E. Snow 
Alfred P. Spada 
William C. Squires 



Theodore J. Starr 
Ruth Mary Sullivan 
Elliot L. Swartz 
Ada Weaverling Tague 
Mahlon Charles Tatro 
Harry James Velander 
Richard A. Ward 
Stanley E. Waskiewicz 
Leonard H. Weinstein 
Lewis Weinstein 
Lewis Francis Wells, Jr. 
Donald Elvin Westcott 
Harold B. White 
Paul R. Wilbur 
George F. Wrightson 
Leo Zaidwerger 



:or 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Chaleo Komarakul Nanagara 
Charles Henry Perin 



CANDIDATE FOR DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF ARTS 



Lug 



Degrees 



Albert Edward Goodrich, Jr. 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Warren Averill — Food Technology 

Ezra Harold Bitcover — Agronomy 

Hsiu-fu Chao — Entomology 

Richard Mowry Colwell— Economics 

Joseph David Dalton — Agronomy 

Matthew E. Highlands — Food Technology 

Nawab Hasan Khan — Entomology 

Robert James Norton- — Entomology 

Louis Frederick Ruder, Jr. — Food Technology 

Moses W. Vaughn — Food Technology 



y 



7 

3 






RECIPIENTS OF HONORARY DEGREES 

Sybil L. Smith — Doctor of Science 

Francis Cormier — Doctor of Landscape Architecture 

Stevenson Whitcomb Fletcher — Doctor of Agriculture 

Robert Frost — Doctor of Literature 

Charles Woolsey Cole — Doctor of Humans Letters 

HONORS 



Elected to Phi Kappa Phi 



Inive 



;itions of pre 
ment Fundst 



>& 



Allan John Bamford 
Arthur Winthrop Barstow 
Richard Aloysius Beauvais 
Harold Monroe Blanchard 
Saul Kaufman Bloch 
George Albert Bucci 
Edward Kenneth Bullock 
Robert John Bussolari 
Paul Charles Colodny 
Daniel Edward Diamond 
Joan France 

William Conwell Gaitenby 
Anthony Francis Gaudy, Jr. 
Edward Leonard Gerstein 
Robert Thomas Grimley 
William John Harrington 
Jeremiah Thomas Herlihy 
Eugene Isenberg 



Hsiu-fu Chao 

Albert Edward J. Goodrich 

Hugo A. Jamnback, Jr. 



Phillips Russell Jones 
Charles Augustus Kiddy 
Barbara Anne Kranich 
Jean Ann Lindsay 
Rachel Leah Liner 
Frank W. McGaughey 
Arthur Motta 
Priscilla Ann Parsons 
Damon Dodge Phinney 
John Givern Reed 
Richard Renzo Rescia 
James Castle Robinson 
Sherman Harris Rosenthal 
Lawrence Eugene Shearer, Jr. 
Jean Elizabeth Small 
Raymond Pitman Stone 
Parker Winslow Welch 



From Graduate School 



Nawab Hasan Khan 
Allen O. Sachs 
Alberta Snow 



Phi Beta Kappa Scholar 
Jean Elizabeth Small 



Phi Kappa Phi Scholar 
George Albert Bucci 



GKJ> 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF EOAKD OF TRUSTEES 



DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Paul Charles Colodny in Chemistry 

Louise Harriett Cushing in French 

Daniel Edward Diamond in Economics 

Edward Leonard Gerstein in Government 

John Sylvester Hall in Zoology 

William John Harrington in Mathematics 

Walter Harold Heintz in Physics 

Jeremiah Thomas Herlihy in Chemistry 

Eugene Isenberg in Economics 

Phillips Russell Jones in Physics 

Lillian Karas in History 

Carolyn Helen Kendrow in Chemistry 

Suzanne Carpenter Knapp in Mathematics 

Jean Ann Lindsay in Home Economics 

Jane McElroy in English 

Richard Renzo Rescia in Mathematics 

Adela Louise Charlotte Skipton in Zoology 

Jean Elizabeth Small in Zoology 

Dianne Beatrice Speed in English 

C. Charles Stephano in Government 

Raymond Pitman Stone in Government 

David Zalman Tavel in History 

Elizabeth Johanna Jacoba VanderPol in Chemistry 

Francis Stuart Wright in Zoology 

Special Award of Prize Books for Outstanding Work in French from 

the French Government to: 

Louise Harriett Cushing 



3r 



ng 



sJ • 



Degrees 






for tp 



IfcXons 
ment Funds* 



■3fip 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



t ^ nr>_r A„.-U^- 



DT 



<D>D 



Decrees 



n g 






&J- 






iitions of pre 
fluent Funds, 



r-i \i 



1635 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 2, 1951, 10:30 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 



:>r 



Degrees 



ig 



Univer 



ment Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 2, 1951, 10:30 A.M., President's Office, Amherst 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brown, Brett, 
Carraichael, Cashin, M rs . Leach, 
Mrs. McNamara, ^aigis, Broderick, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Van ^eter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 

The meeting was adjourned to Butterfield Dormitory for 

the same hour. 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Upon the recommendation of the President and of the 

faculty of the University, it was 

VOTED: To award the following degrees to those 

candidates as listed on the attached corrected 
Commencement program for 1951. 



of Science 

of Arts 

of Business Administration 

of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

of Science in Chemical Engineering 

of Science in Civil Engineering 

of Science in Electrical Engineering 

of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

of Vocational Agriculture 



283 


Bachelor- 


184. 


Bachelor 


69 


Bachelor 


5 


Bachelor 


12 


Bachelor- 


29 


Bachelor 


4-0 


Bachelor 


51 


Bachelor 


6 


Bachelor 



679 



Upon the recommendation of the President and of the 

faculty of the Graduate School, it was 

VOTED: To award the following degrees to those 
candidates as listed on the Commencement 
program for 1951. 

U Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 
112 Master of Science 

2 Master of Landscape Architecture 
1 Master of Arts 
10 Doctor of Philosophy 



1635 



Degrees 



129 



1636 



TRUSTEE 



i.liajm Proctor 
beauest 



Budget 
meeting 



Floriana 

Tarantino 

hearing 



Quarterly 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Haigis, Chairman of the Trustee Committee on 
Finance, said that his committee is preparing a report on the use 
of Trust Funds and this report will be ready for the next meeting 
of the Board. 

Upon the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To accept with appreciation the William 
Proctor bequest of a large and valuable 
collection of insects from Mt. Desert 
Island, together with cases and records 
and an endowment of $2,000 for maintenance 
of the collection. 

It was 

VOTED.: That the budget meeting of the Board shall 

take place on Wednesday, June 27, in Boston. 

President Van Meter reported the request of Miss Floriana 
Tarantino for hearing before the Board on her dismissal from the 
English Department. The President reported that he has just re- 
ceived a letter from the American Association of University Pro- 
fessors written in her behalf. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To extend an invitation to Miss Tarantino 

to appear before a meeting of the Executive 
Committee inasmuch as Miss Tarantino will 
not be available at the next Board meeting 
on June 27 and the next scheduled meeting 
after that time will occur in February of 
1952. 

President Van Meter read a letter from Superintendent 

of Schools in Waltham complaining of the contents of the spring 

issue of the "Quarterly" student magazine. After discussion, it 



was 



VOTED : To leave this matter in the hands of the 
President. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Van Meter discussed with the Board the 
recommendation of Dr. Theodore T. Kozlowski, Head of the Department 
of Botany, that Dr. Walter M. Banfield be dismissed, and it was 
VOTED : To leave this matter with the President. 

Treasurer Hawley reported that the University budget for 
the year beginning July 1, 1951 has been cut still further by the 
Senate. The budget was originally cut in the Governor's recommenda- 
tions, was reduced further in the House and now still further in 
the Senate. It appears at this time that there will be approxi- 
mately $73 > 000 less for personal service than is available during 
the current year and $45,000 less than is currently available for 
general maintenance. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 



Qc^^k 



. 



Chairman 




Secretary 



637 



Walter M. 

Banfield 

dismissed 



Budget 



1638 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



TRUSTEE 



June 27, 1951, 6:30 P.^., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass, 



Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brown, 
Carmichael, Broderick, Deely, 
Hubbard, Whitmore, Mrs. Leach, 
Mrs. McNamara, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Hawley, Secretary Burke 



It was 

VOTED : To waive reading of the call and reading 

of the minutes of the last previous meeting. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it 



was 



Metal 

Storage 

Buildings 



VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sign contract 
in the name of and for the Board of Trustees 
with Aquadro & Cerruti in the amount of 
$9,617.68 covering dismantling of two storage 
buildings at Lakeville, moving them and re- 
erecting them on the campus at Amherst. 

It was also 

VOTED: To place one of these buildings on the 

athletic field and the other in the ravine. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it 



was 



Turbine 
House 



VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sign contract 
in the name of and for the Board of Trustees 
with Daniel O'Connell's Sons Inc. for the 
construction of a Turbine House addition in 
the amount of approximately $190,568.4-5 pro- 
viding sufficient funds are made available. 



was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it 



VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sign contract 
in the name of and for the Board of Trustees 
with Morandi-Proctor Co., Inc. in the amount 
of $6,i44-9 for furnishing and installing a 
dish washer and other equipment in the kitchen 
of Greenough dormitory. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it 



was 



VOTED : To empower Trustees Bartlett, 'Whitmore and 
Haigis and Treasurer Hawley to investigate 
the desirability of loaning $20,000 at 1$ 
interest on first mortgage of the Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon house and to make the loan if 
it seems desirable to the group. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to withdraw 

$20,000 from the Amherst Savings Bank to 
provide funds for the fraternity mortgage 
loan if the loan seemed desirable. 

Chairman Bartlett invited all members of the Board to 
study the written report of the Finance Committee regarding endow- 
ment and trust funds and requested members of the Board to submit 
their ideas and comments to hira for consideration in the fall by 
the Executive Committee. 

Secretary Burke reported that under Trustee authorization, 
the University, in cooperation with the State Department of 
Education, has been conducting extension courses for University 
credit in the city of Pittsfield. Recently the school authorities 
from Pittsfield and officials of General Electric Corporation 
have requested the University to set up a program of extension 
oourses in Pittsfield leading to the degree Bachelor of Science 



Dish Wash- 
ing Machine 



Siema Alphs 

Eosilon 

loan 



Endowment 
Funds 



Extension 
Courses 



1640 



TRUSTEE 



Arthur N. 
Julian 



Charles N. 
DuBois - 
Director of 
the Extension 
Division of 
the University 



Charles F. 
Weckwerth 



Jack E. Gray 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in Electrical Engineering. The proposal is that two courses be 

given each semester by teachers from the University who would 

travel to Pittsfield evenings, laboratory work which could not 

be provided for at Pittsfield would be given at Amherst Saturdays. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to consult with 

Commissioner Desmond concerning this program 
and to proceed with the program if this seems 
desirable. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To name Arthur N. Julian, Emeritus Professor 
of German, effective upon his retirement 
August 31, 1951. 

President Van Meter said that the extension program of 
the University has been- growing and that there is considerable de- 
mand for expansion of this activity. He felt that the time has 
come when extension work should be assigned as a definite 
responsibility of a member of the faculty. Upon his recommendation, 



it was 



VOTED: To name Charles N. DuBois as Director of 
the Extension Division of the University. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To name Charles F. Weckwerth as Professor 
of Recreation and Head of the Curriculum 
in Recreation and Nature Education effective 
in the fall of 1951 - the exact date to be 
determined by the President. 

Upon the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED: To name Dr. Jack E. Gray as Research Pro- 
fessor of Poultry Disease effective 
August 1, 1951. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Van Meter said that for some years the 
University has had a Division of Military Science and Tactics 
staffed by Army officers. Since the war the Division of Military 
Science and Tactics has offered two separate programs (l) Armored 
Cavalry and (2) Air Force. Nov the government requires the 
separation of these two units, and if the University is to con- 
tinue with Air Force training as well as Armored Cavalry training, 
it must enter into separate contracts with the Air Force and the 



U. S. Army. 
VOTED: 



After discussion, it was 

To authorize the President to enter into 
negotiations leading to separate contracts 
with the U. S. Army and the U. S. Air 
Force for the establishment of these 
separate units. 



It was also 

VOTED ; To discontinue the Division of Military 

Science and Tactics under that title and to 
authorize the establishment of a Department 
of Armored Cavalry and a Department of Air 
Science and Tactics with the officer in 
charge of each unit responsible to the Dean 
of the University. 

President Van Meter said that in common with other 
colleges which provide teacher training, the University has placed 
apprentice teachers in surrounding public schools. In recent 
years, it has become customary for colleges to make payments to 
critic teachers in the schools for the work which they do in super- 
vising the student apprentice teachers. He said that it would be 
less costly to the University if free tuition could be granted to 
the critic teacher for one course at the University in lieu of 
cash payment. After discussion, it was 



1641 



Division of 
Military 
Science 
Discontinued 



Department of 
Armored Cavalry 

Department of 
Air Science & 
Tactics 



Critic 
Teachers 



I /_° /I i k 



1642 



TRUSTEE 



Tuition 
Waived 



Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To authorize the President to grant free 
tuition for one course to each critic 
teacher in the Massachusetts school system 
who supervises the practice teaching of a 
student apprentice teacher from the 
University. The privilege of free tuition 
is limited to one year from the time when the 
service as critic teacher is rendered. 

The balance of the meeting was devoted to consideration 

of the University budget for the year beginning July 1, 1952 . The 

University officers answered questions raised by members of the 

Board and after lengthy discussion, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to submit a budget 

for operation and maintenance of the University 
for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1952 in 
the amount of $5,532,038. 

It was also 

VOTED: To authorize the President to submit a 

capital outlay budget for the year beginning 
July 1, 1952 in the amount of $5,213,100* 

It was also 

VOTED: To authorize the President to submit a 

budget for special programs for the year 
beginning July 1, 1952 in the amount of 
|62,100. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:00 P.M. 



fl 




Chairman 



Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



October 29, 1951 



Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated October 19, 1951 from 

Secretary Burke to the Board of Trustees of the University of 

Massachusetts, and the resultant mail ballot are hereby made 

part of the official records of the Board. 



October 19, 1951 

Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

On September 15, 1951 "the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts voted on the 
recommendation of President Van Meter to approve an award of a 
$2,000 Lotta M. Crabtree fellowship to Philip J. Spear beginning 
October 1, 1951. Mr. Spear is a candidate for the Doctor's de- 
gree in Entomology at the University of Massachusetts. 

Since then Mr. Spear has withdrawn his application for 
this fellowship and the Graduate School Council of the University 
has voted unanimously to recommend David L. Meggison to receive 
the fellowship effective October 1, 1951. Mr. Meggison is a can- 
didate for the Doctor's degree and is majoring in Dairy Industry. 
He is strongly recommended by Gilbert L. Voodside, Dean of the 
Graduate School and by Dr. Carl R. Fellers, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Food Technology, who says - "Mr. Meggison spent two years 
in this department carrying on graduate study for the Master of 
Science degree. He has an unusually good scholastic record and he 
is continuing advanced graduate work in the Department of Dairy 
Industry. Mr. Meggison has a keen appreciation of research and 
development in agricultural crops." 

Dr. D. J. Hankinson, Head of the Department of Dairy 
Industry, says, - "I wish to endorse Mr. Meggison' s application 
and to state that in my opinion this financial support would 
contribute to a more complete study of his proposed project. 
The problem of quaternary ammonium compounds has been a very 
troublesome one in the manufacture of dairy products. 
Mr. Meggison is very scholarly in his approach to problems and 
has displayed considerable initiative in several undertakings 
here in this department. His academic record has been very good. 

William B. Esselen, Jr., Associate Research Professor 
in Food Technology, says - "In his work in this department, 
Mr. iieggison was a diligent and enthusiastic student and research 
worker. " 



1643 



Lotta M. 
Crabtree - 
fellowship 



1644 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



We do not like to trouble the Trustees with mail 
ballots but President Van Meter feels that this nomination could 
not wait till the next meeting of the Board and still accomplish 
its purpose of making wise use of the available Lotta Crabtree 
funds. The President recommends Mr. Meggison for your approval. 
Would you please submit your vote on the attached mail ballot. 



JWB/D 
Enc. 



/s/ James W. Burke 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



MAIL BALLOT 



to 

not to 



On the recommendation of President Van Meter, I vote 



approve award of a §2,000 Lotta M. Crabtree fellow- 



ship to David L. Meggison beginning October 1, 1951* 



Signed: 



Joseph W. Bartlett 
A. C. Brett 
Henry T. Broderick 
Harry Dunlap Brown 
Leonard Carmichael 
William M. Gashin 
J. M. Deely 
Lottie A. Leach 
William A. Or ton 



John J. Desmond, Jr. 
John W. Haigis 
Ernest Hoftyzer 
Clifford C. Hubbard 
Elizabeth L. McNamara 
Ralph F. Taber 
Philip F. Whitmore 
R. A. Van Meter 




s 



Secretary 



Chairman 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



December 20, 1951 

Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated December 12, 1951 from 

Secretary Burke to the Board of Trustees of the University of 

Massachusetts, and the resultant mail ballot are hereby made part 

of the official records of the Board. 



December 12, 1951 



To Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 



1645 



Treasurer- 
Kenneth V. 
Johnson 



You will have learned from minutes of the November 20, 
1951 meeting of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts that Kenneth W. Johnson was 
selected as Treasurer of the University to succeed Robert D. 
Hawley. Copy of the University's news story concerning the 
appointment of Mr. Johnson is enclosed. 

Beginning January 1, 1952, it will be necessary for 
Mr. Johnson to have authority for signing of such papers and 
documents as Treasurer Hawley has signed in the past. To make 
this possible, Chairman Bartlett has authorized me to submit the 
enclosed mail ballot to all members of the Board of Trustees of 
the University. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ James W. B urke 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 

jwb/d 



vote to 
not to 



MAIL BALLOT 



X _ authorize Kenneth IT. Johnson, Treasurer 



to sign any and all checks, withdrawal orders, drafts, certifi- 
cates of deposit, stock certificates, and all other documents re- 
quired to be signed or endorsed in the name and behalf of the 
University of Massachusetts or the Board of Trustees of said 
University of Massachusetts in order to deal with, withdraw from 
and deposit to any accounts now existing or that may exist in the 
future in the First National Bank of Amherst, Amherst, Massa- 
chusetts or other depositories authorized by the Trustees, said 



1646 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



authority to include his right to sign or endorse any paper or 
document that may be required to be signed in connection with any 
transaction that may take place by said University of Massachusetts 
or the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts in 
any financial transaction that may be had with or through said 
the First National Bank of Amherst or other depositories 
authorized by the Trustees, including dealings with certified 
checks and foreign exchange. 



I vote to X _ appoint Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer, as 



no" 



to 



Custodian of Military Property for the University. 



I vote to 
not to 



X authorize Kenneth ¥. Johnson, Treasurer, 



to sign all documents which are required by the Alcohol Tax 
Utilities Bureau of Internal Revenue for the University in 
connection with its use of alcohol for laboratory and scientific 
purposes. 



I vote to 
not to 



X authorize Kenneth W» Johnson, Treasurer, 



to sign schedules and vouchers for disbursement of state funds in 
the absence of the President and the Secretary in accordance with 
the requirements of Section 5> Chapter 75* G.L. 



X _ authorize the bonding of Kenneth ¥. 



I vote to 
not to i 
Johnson as Treasurer of the University at $10,000. This is the 
same amount as the Fidelity Bond covering the present Treasurer, 



Signed: Joseph ¥. Bartlett 
A. C. Brett 
Harry Dunlap Brown 
Leonard Carmichael 
William M. Cashin 
William A. Orton 
J. M. Deely 
John J. Desmond, Jr. 



John ¥. Haigls 
Ernest Hoftyzer 
Elizabeth L. McNamara 
Ralph F. Taber 
Philip F. Whitniore 
Henry T. Broderick 
Clifford C. Hubbard 
Lottie A. Leach 



~7 




s 



_Secretary 



Chairman 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

. February 14, 1952, 10:30 A.M., State House, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Mrs. McNamara, 
Carmichael, Cashin, Whitmore, 
Crowley, Brown, Taber, Orton, 
Desmond, Deely, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

The meeting having been called to order, the Trustees ad- 
journed to the Hotel Statler where the meeting was resumed. 
It was 

VOTED : To waive the reading of the call and the 
minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett appointed the following Nominating 
Committee to recommend officers and committee members for the 
coming year: Trustee Whitmore, Chairman, Trustees Crowley and 
Taber. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the attached report on hiring pro- 
cedure and the attached recommendations as to 
procedures on promotion. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the following conditions for tenure 
as defined below of professional staff members 
of the University of Massachusetts. These con- 
ditions shall be subject to laws of the State 
of Massachusetts in relation to appointments 
and service. For purposes of this vote, the 
term tenure means appointment without specific 
limit of time, and such service should be termi- 
nated only for adequate cause, except in the 
case of retirement for age, and in the case of 
institutional financial exigencies. These rules 
shall be effective with faculty members first 
employed on or after September 1, 1952. 



1647 



Nominating 
Committee 









Report on 
Hiring Pro- 
cedures 



Report on 
Tenure 



1648 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1. During the first three years a member 
of the professional staff shall be 
appointed for one year terms. 

2. During the third year a department head 
must either recommend him for no further 
appointment, for tenure, or file with 
the President a written statement of 
agreement between the department head 
and the faculty member concerning the 
terms of further employment, such agree- 
ment being subject to the approval of 
the President. 

3. Any staff member whose appointment is 
not to be renewed shall be so notified 

in conference and subsequently in writing 
by his department head at least six months 
prior to the expiration of his period of 
appointment. 

4-. Personnel hired under these conditions 
should be made acquainted with tenure 
regulations as described above. 

5. A staff member on tenure confronted by 
dismissal is entitled to a hearing before 
the Trustees. 

At the expiration of five years from the coming into 

effect of the above system, the appropriate committees of the 

faculty and of the Board of Trustees shall review its operation 

and make recommendations as to its continuance, with or without 

modification, in the light of experience and of conditions then 



prevailing. 



In view of the adoption of the above conditions as to 
tenure, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To amend article 8 of the By-Laws of the 

Board of Trustees by striking out paragraph 
2 which reads "Appointments to positions in 
the professional staff shall be for one year 
during the first three years of service and 
for indefinite tenure thereafter, so long as 
service in and to the institution continues 
mutually satisfactory." and to insert in its 
place the following paragraph: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"During the first three years a member 
of the professional staff shall be 
appointed for one year terms. During 
the third year a department head must 
either recommend him for no further 
appointment, for tenure, or file with 
the President a written statement of 
agreement between the department head 
and the faculty member concerning the 
terms of further employment, such agree- 
ment being subject to the approval of 
the President." 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following requests for sabbati- 
cal leave with the understanding that they 
would be granted if funds permit. If adequate 
funds are not available, selection shall be 
made by the President from the eight candidates 
listed. 

1. Leonard R. Wilson . Head of Department of Geology 
and Mineralogy, February 1 through August 31* 1953 
at full pay to complete the writing of a book on 
general micro-paleontology. 

2. William H. Ross, Associate Professor of Physics, 
September 1, 1952 through August 31, 1953 at half 
pay for study in modern developments and methods 
in Physics at the University of California in 
Berkeley. 

3. Nathan S. Hale, Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry, September 1, 1952 through August 31, 1953 
at half pay to complete scheduled course work and 
residence requirements for the Ph.D. degree at the 
University of Minnesota. 

4.. Robert P. Holdsworth. Head of Department of 

Forestry, February 1 through August 31, 1953 at 
full pay to study forest industries of a sustained 
yield character and to make photographic slides to 
be used for instructional purposes. 

5. Oliver C. Roberts . Associate Professor of Pomology, 
September 1, 1952 through January 31, 1953 at full 
pay to visit the major fruit growing regions of the 
United States to study fruit growing and handling. 



1649 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Wilson, 
Leonard R. 



Ross, William 
H. 



Hale, Nathan 
S. 



Holdsworth, 
Robert P. 



Roberts, 
Oliver C. 



1650 



Caldwell, 
Theodore C. 



TRUSTEE 



Traver, 
Jay R 



Alviani, 
Doric 



Vinal, William 
G., Emeritus 
Professor of 
Nature Educa- 



-H 



ion 



New Courses 



Kimball, Milo - 
Dean of School 
of Business 
Administration 



Appointments 

and 
Promotions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



6. Theodore C. Caldwell. Professor of History, 
February 1 through August 31 > 1953 at full 
pay for study in England of course problems in 
English History. 

7. Jay R Traver , Assistant Professor of Zoology, 
February 1 through August 31> 1953 at full pay 
to continue studies on may flies at Cornell 
University and Western Reserve University* 

8. Doric Alviani , Associate Professor of Music, 
for one semester of the year beginning 
September 1, 1952 at full pay to conclude work 
and study for the doctors degree. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To name William G. Vinal, Emeritus Professor 
of Nature Education, effective on the date 
of his retirement, November 30, 1951- 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the attached new courses of study 
provided that staff and budget requirements 
can be met. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To promote Milo Kimball from Professor of 

Business Administration to Dean of the School 
of Business Administration at annual salary 
of $7080 effective February 1, 1952. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the appointments and promotions 
as listed on the attached sheets. 

It was 

VOTED: To express the sorrow of the Trustees on the 

death of Charles N. DuBois, Assistant Professor 
of English, and Arthur N. Julian, Head of the 
Department of German. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the report on retirements and resig- 
nations as presented by the President. (See 
attached list) 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, it was unanimously 



VOTED: 



To authorize payment from Student Trust Funds 
of annual extra compensation beginning July 1, 
1951 to the following coaches of academic 
activities with the understanding that appoint- 
ments to these coaching positions will be made 
by the President. 



1. For general supervision of academic 

activities 

2. For coaching of Collegian 

3. For coaching of Quarterly 
4.. For coaching of Index 

5. For coaching of Handbook 

6. For coaching of Singing 

7. For instrumental coaching 

8. For coaching of Roister Doisters 

9. For coaching of Radio-debate 



$300 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

150 

100 



651 



Retirements 

and 
Resignations 



Academic 

Activities 

Coaches 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study, the Trustees unanimously adopted the following reso- 
lution as part of the records of the Board and instructed the 
Secretary to submit copy of the resolution to Mrs. Leach. 

MRS. LOTTIE M. LEACH 

Be It resolved that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts express their whole-hearted appreciation 
of the devoted service and outstanding contributions of 
Mrs. Lottie M. Leach as a trustee of the University dur- 
ing a total of fourteen years. 

Without lessening her attention to the problems of 
the entire University, Mrs. Leach took a special interest 
in the development of greater opportunities for women stu- 
dents and in the strengthening of the Extension Service. 

Her interest in the welfare and growth of the Uni- 
versity was manifest not only in her faithful attendance 
at all Trustee meetings, but in her numerous visits to 
the campus and her constant encouragement of the Univer- 
sity officials in their tasks. 



Resolution on 
Mrs. Leach 



1652 



TRUSTEE 



Resolution on 
Robert D. 
Hawley 



Report on 
Facts and 
Figures 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Trustees recognize Mrs. Leach's continuing 
devotion to the University through her membership on 
the Women's Advisory Council and express to her their 
gratitude and their sincere best wishes. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, the Trustees unanimously adopted the following 

resolution as part of the records of the Board and instructed the 

Secretary to submit copy of the resolution to Mr. Hawley. 

ROBERT D. HAWLEY 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts express their sincere appreciation of 
the loyalty and devotion to duty of Robert D. Hawley 
during his thirty years of service as Extension Editor, 
&g Secretary, and since 1939 as Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity. 

His painstaking attention to detail, his constant 
dedication to the administration and development of the 
University, his ability to interpret University affairs 
to the Trustees, to officials of the Commonwealth and 
to the Faculty have contributed immeasurably to the 
growth and evolution of today' s University from the 
small Agricultural College which Mr. Hawley joined at 
the close of World War I. 

In his retirement he takes with him the gratitude, 
the admiration, and the well wishes of the Board of 
Trustees he served so well. 

Trustee Cashin reported for his Committee on Facts and 

Figures concerning a medical school. This committee is composed 

of Mr. Cashin, Chairman, and Trustees Brett, Carmichael, and Taber. 

The committe believes that it will cost a minimum of $15,000,000 

for the establishment of a medical school and that the annual cost 

of operation per student would be at least $2500. Tuition income 

would be approximately $800 per student per year. Copy of Mr. 

Cashin' s report is appended to these minutes. It -was 

VOTED : To accept the report of the committee with 
thanks and to continue the committee as a 
means of maintaining liaison with the legis- 
lative committee on the medical school. 



1653 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Deely reported for the Committee on Recognized 
Student Activities which is composed of Mr. Deely, Chairman, and 
Trustees Brown, Hoftyzer, Hubbard, and Crowley. He said that his 
committee met on February 7 with the Academics Activities Board, 
the Athletics Board, and the Committee on Student Life at the 
University. He said that his committee is enthusiastic over the 
possibilities of cooperating with students and faculty to attain 
desirable objectives in connection with student activities. 

The Trustees 

VOTED : To approve and ratify actions of all committees 
of the Board since the date of the last annual 
meeting. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED ; To award the following honorary degrees at the 
1952 Commencement with the understanding that 
the recipients must be present in person to re- 
ceive the degree; otherwise the degree is not 
awarded: 

Vannevar Bush - Doctor of Science 

Albert F. McGuinn - Doctor of Science 

J. Emerson Greenaway - Doctor of Humane Letters 

Otto Degener - Doctor of Science 

Howard Lawton Knight - Doctor of Agriculture 

Frank P. Washburn - Master of Agriculture 

The Trustees studied the recommendations of the Committee 

on Scholarships appointed by the Board for recommending candidates 

for Commonwealth Scholarships as provided by Chapter 524 of the 

Acts of 1951. There are twenty-five Commonwealth Scholarships for 

each of the four undergraduate classes at the University and each 

scholarship is in the amount of $250. According to Chapter 52/+, 



Committee on 
Recognized 
Student 
Activities 



Ratification 
of Actions 



Honorary 
Degrees 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



1654 



TRUSTEE 



President's 
Annual Report 



Nominating 
Committee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



"A scholarship shall continue for such time as the recipient 

thereof remains a student in good standing at the University, but 

in no event shall any student receive such scholarship aid for 

more than four years." After studying the candidates, the Trustees 

unanimously 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth Scholarships as per 
attached sheet. 

The Trustees unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the following conditions for con- 
tinuing Commonwealth Scholarships after 
the freshman year: 

n To be eligible for a Commonwealth Scholar- 
ship after the first year a student must 
meet the following conditions set up by the 
Committee on Scholarships. 

1. Maintain a scholastic record commensurate 
with his ability and at least equal to 
the scholastic average of his class. 

2. Have a financial need that rates highly. 

3. Continue to be highly recommended from 
the standpoint of character, attitude 
and deportment." 

President Van Meter presented his annual report and it 
was unanimously 

VOTED : To accept the report as presented. 

Trustee VJhitmore reported for the Nominating Committee 

and it was unanimously 

VOTED : To instruct the Secretary to cast one 
ballot for the following slate of 
officers and committee members for the 
ensuing year; 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President, Paul A. Dever 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bartlett 
Secretary, James W. Burke 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Leonard Carmichael, Chairman Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 
John J. Desmond William A. Orton 

Clifford C. Hubbard 

Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 



1655 



Committees 



Alden C. Brett, Chairman 
Harry D. Brown 
Henry T. Broderick 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. Whitmore 
Alden C. Brett 
John M. Deely 

Committee on Finance 

John W. Haigis, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
William M. Cashin 



Dennis M. Crowley 
Ernest Hoftyzer 



John W. Haigis 
Ralph F. Taber 



Ralph F. Taber 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Committee on Recognized Student Activities 

John M. Deely, Chairman Ernest Hoftyzer 

Harry D. Brown Clifford C. Hubbard 

Dennis M. Crowley 



Committee on Legislation * 

Ralph F. Taber, Chairman 
William M. Cashin 
John M. Deely 

Executive Committee 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Leonard Carmichael 



John W. Haigis 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 



William M. Cashin 
Philip F. Whitmore 



On the recommendation of President Van Meter and 

Treasurer Johnson, the Trustees unanimously 

VOTED : To accept the annual report of the Treasurer 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1951* 

It was 

VOTED : That the Treasurer be authorized to use a check 
signing machine with his signature impression 
shown thereon for the disbursement of University 
funds from the First National Bank of Amherst. 



Treasurer 1 s 
Report 



Johnson, K. W. 
sign checks 



1656 



TRUSTEE 



Investments 



ROTC 
Uniforms 



Hollis French - 
change of name 



Summer Session 
tuition rates 



Elm Disease 

Control 

Laboratory 



Durfee 
Conservatory 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : That the Chairman of the Finance Committee 
and the Treasurer be authorized to reinvest 
$22,000 presently in the U. S. Treasury 
Certificates of Indebtedness 1 7/S's due 
4-A/52. 

It was 

VOTED : That the President and Treasurer be 

authorized to increase the amount of the 
1953 Budget Request by $10,000 to provide 
for the payment of ROTC uniforms under the 
terms of our contract with the Army and 
Air Force. This amount is returnable to 
the State Treasurer through reimbursement 
by the Federal Government. 

It was 

VOTED : That the name of Hollis French of Boston 

has been changed to the firm name of Merrill 
Associates, and, whereas the Trustees in 
Executive Committee on November 20, 1951 > 
authorized the Treasurer to execute a contract 
with Hollis French for certain engineering 
services, now therefore, be it confirmed that 
the Treasurer is authorized to sign contract 
with Merrill Associates for said engineering 
services. 

It was 

VOTED : That the tuition charge for non-resident 
graduate students be established at the 
rate of |7.50 per credit hour for the Six- 
Week Summer Session. 

It was 

VOTED: That the Treasurer be authorized to sign a 
contract with M. I. O'Connor, General Con- 
tractor, Northampton, Massachusetts, in the 
amount of $7,600, low bid, for the Alteration 
of the Elm Disease Control Laboratory. 

It was 

VOTED: That the Treasurer be authorized to accept the 
offer of Lord and Burnham to design without 
charge the new Botanical building to replace 
the old Durfee Conservatory with the understand- 
ing that the Trustees undertake no legal or 
moral obligation to award any subsequent contract 
to said Lord and Burnham. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED ; That the Treasurer be authorized to sign a 
contract for the reconstruction of the Old 

Paige Laboratory provided a low bid within 
the appropriation for this project is re- 
ceived. 

It was 

VOTED ; That the Treasurer be authorized to sign 

contracts for the construction of a labora- 
tory and other improvements to French and 
Wilder Halls provided low bids for these 
proj ects within the appropriation are re- 
ceived. 

It was 

VOTED ; That the Treasurer be authorized to make re- 
funds in the full amount of payments made for 
tuition, fees, board and room rent to students 
who have been in attendance, have made payments 
prior to the opening date of the next semester, 
and then withdraw from the University before 
the first day of the next semester. 

Treasurer Johnson said that in June of 1951, the 
Trustees authorized the President and Treasurer to submit a bud- 
get for the University for the fiscal year 1953 in the amount of 
|5? 582,038. Since that time the Legislature enacted Chapter 715 
of the Acts of 1951 which increased salaries in the amount of 
$420 a year. The University has cut the budget in a number of 
places to conform with recommendations of the Governor but even 
so the increased salary costs raised the total above that 
recommended by the Trustees. 

In view of the increased salary costs, the Trustees 

VOTED ; To authorize the President and Treasurer to 
amend the University budget for the fiscal 
year 1953 so that the total askings would be 
in the amount of $5,979,958. 



1657 



Reconstruction 
of Paige 
Laboratory 



Improvements to 
French & Wilder 
Halls 



Refunds 



Budget 



1658 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 P.M. 




Secretary 



Chairman 



BiFOET OB HIRING PBOCED0HE 
By Subcommittee of 
EDUCATIONAL POLICIES C'OOTSCXL 



The subcommittee was charged with presenting recommendation en 
the following topic st 

1* Procedure in hiring members of the teaching staff* 

2* Procedure in selection of department heads* 

3* procedure in selection ©f deans* 

4* Procedure relating to tenure of staff members* 

The present report is concerned with the first three topics 
listed* In preparing the report 9 information was obtained about hiring 
procedure at other institutions* chiefly Harvard, Cornell Yale, Michigan 
State/ and Knees Island State* A* recent book by Lloyd S* .Voodburne^ 
Ito3&LJteE^ (Harper* 1950) has been 

helpful # 

This report accepts the provisions of the Fair Employment 
Practices Law as passed by the Massachusetts Legislature* 

BgCQfMMpATION^ 

In recommending personnel the department head should seek the advice 
of other members of his department* 

I* Positions Below the Peak, of Assistant Professor 

For all positions below that of assistant professor the 
responsibility for recommendation rests with the department head* 
This recommendation must go from the department head to the Bean of 
the School and through him to the Dean of the University and then 
to the President for official appointment* 

• 
S* • ^• J gMlQ!L? l | > -.^ r 9^ @ ^sor i s iii o f all Hanks 

Appointments to the rank of assistant^ associate and professor 
are of such importance to the institution that they merit & special 
procedure. This procedure should apply both to these appointed front 
, off the cempas and those promoted from within the staff. A worki?.;. 
committee' consisting" of • the head of the department as chairssa% the 

dean of the school and the dean of the University shall recommend * 

The department head will suteait to the committee a statement of 
the requirements of the position, his procedure in making -the search 
for candidates and data relative to at least one alternative applicant, 

Heads of departments and deans must make it clear to candidates 
that their recommendations are not an official commitment* 



•ft* »'*-'» 



Official appointment of instructors, assistant and associate 
professors is mad© by the President and confirmed by the Board of 
Trustees* The appointment of professors . however* is recommended 
by the President and the appointment is made by the Board of Trustees* 

Heads of Departments 

Heads of departments should be selected by a committee con- 
sisting of 8 

1* Dean of the school concerned, (chairman) 

2. Dean of the University 

3. President of the University 

Presentation of candidates to the committee will be the task 
of the dean of the school* In doing this he should consult members of 
the department concerned and. heads of allied departments. The appoint- 
ment Is made by the Board of Trustees* 

A* Bean of Schools 



In the selection of deans of schools it is recommended 
that the President appoint an advisory group which might well include the 
following? 



1. Dean of the University. 

2. A representative or representatives from the 
school concerned. 

3* A representative or representatives from a 
related school or schools. 

B. Dean of the University. 

In the selection of a dean of the University it t» 
recommended that the President appoint an advisory group the size aisd 
membership of which would be at his discretion. A committee of five 
is suggested. 

C* Dean of the Graduate School. 

In the selection of the dean of the graduate school 
it is recommended that the President appoint an advisory group repre- 
senting the schools doing graduate work. 

All appointments are made fcy 
the Board of Trustees. 



Approved October 23, 1951 



Gilbert Moodside 

George Marston 

Philip Gamble 

Frank Band 

R. E. Trippensee, Chairman 



BeeosEaendations on Promotions for i'lembers of the 
Teaching Staff to the Educational Policies Council 

by a subcommittee on Hiring Procedure Tenure*. 
Pooling of Positions and Promotions 



R gCjO^endat ion, on Promotions. 

The service which a university renders to a state depends to a 
large degree on the quality and moi'&le of its staff* Morale is dependent 
on many conditions* one of which is the hope of promotion*, 

sis of Personnel Recomme ndations 



Because of the variety of conditions which make for good instruction 
it is thought no specific formula should be set up as a measure of satis- 
factory teaching service. Qualities to be kept in mind in making recommenda- 
tions are as follows i 

&• Tffachinff Ab^l^tv.s Does this individual have a sincere 
interest in the welfare of the student'? Does his desire 
to be of genuine assistance to the student reach the 
point where extra time is given freely and personal in- 
terests set aside in order to help a student? Does h® 
stimulate the student to seek knowledge and understanding? 
Does he use a variety of teaching methods * present well 
organized saaterial and keep up-to-date on subject matter? 

b. Profess ional Improvement ; Is he interested in research or 
writing in his field and is he constantly seeking to im- 
prove himself as a teacher and scholar? 

e. Insti tution&I Intey.e.s.fcs A member of the teaching staff 
must have faith in the University, He must show this faith 
by his willingness to assume extra-curricular responsibilities 
and by his enthusiasm to cooperate with associates . He must 
be tolerant of but not satisfied with conditions less than 
perfect. 

In consideration of the above department heads should make 
or withhold recommendations- 

Gilbert Woodside 

George Marston 

Philip Gamble 

Frank Rand 

R. E« Trippensee, Chairman 

Approved Cctober 23, 1951 



RERT WBmmBBOATR O0OBS1S OF STOUT 

It is recosimended that the University be antfaordsseA to 
off ©r the following new courses of study* 

|^i^l;^t,mJL,^gill^Fi3ag ,88 - Befrigerat&om. Fundamentals in planning tad 
operating a refrigerated storage with particular reference to 
slse, details of construction, cooling load, and refrigerating 

machinery and accessories. For non-engineering laajors. 
.1 class tasrs. 

1 3-hour laboratory period Credit, SI. 

Chemical BrtgAneering T7 - Element® of Unit Operations, For other than 

ii turf-- i n i^ r i rt i Wm i inu i - i ffn n ni i THW ii n Bi i iiiniiifrnnr* i iiriiriirirr iiil ii n " *K 

chemical engineering majors* In introduction to some of the 
unit op erations of chemical engineerings especially those which 
nay be of nee -in other process industries* Includes: material® 

balance problems, movement of solid©, and fluids 9 filtration, 
centrifngation, extraction, distillation, g&s absorption, evapora- 
tion, and drying, The emgsli&sis -is on lie principles of the unit 
operations and the types of equipment used, rather than the 
quantitative aspects and the design of equipment* 

2 class hours. 

1 2-hour computation or laboratory period Credit, 3« 

jgtueatijgn (iii 60 - Elementary School Curriculum. This course is desired to 
present a picture of the elementary school curriculum from the 
point of view of content and aetbodology* Raphaels will be 
placed on the unit method and the activity prograa. 

3 class hours. Creditj 3. 

P^fiafjlffs,,,^ - Teaching of Elementary Beading and Language Arts, lhi9 

course will discuss and demcostrate e^ergiMg methods of prevent- 
ing and remedying reading difficulties. Attention will be given 
to the purposes, methods and materials of oral and written 
language and reading. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

jjaeatipB 62 - fetching of ESLemaatary Arithmetic and Science. Shis c^mrse 
will discuss and demonstrate accepted methods asd mterials in the 
teaching of these subjects in the intermediate grades. Attention 
will be given to methods of integrating these courses into the 
total program of the school. 
3 class hours* Credit, 3. 

location im 63 - Principles of Elementary Biucation. This course is desired 
to acquaint the student with the aims, organization, program, 
pupil population, etc. of the elementary school and the relation- 
ship between this level of education and the secondary school 
level which follows. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3. 



_fc- 



gBlc.,61 - Teaching of tfosic in the Elementary Grades. The principles of 
musical development are studied with particular emphasis on 
presentation in the classroom situation. Although the course is 
designed primarily for those preparing to teach in the elementary 
grades, others may elect the course upon approval of the instructor, 
8 class hoars. Credit, 3* 

tt&x&vaics* Ik© field of metaphysics defined in 



ilsiinct&oa f rem the field of s«ieac©| contrasting theories 
of rs&lity offered by c«te*porary mataralism and idealism, 
especially in the light ©f r©s®at developments in biological 
a&d pl$rslcal scisne®$ analysis of basic idaem which will enable 

' ; >e stud®at to continue a fruitful- development of his own 



% 



3 class hours. Credit, 3< 



«£» 



- Theory of Kmosrledgcs. llypes of knowledge and correlated 

methods of knowings questions of certainty, probability, and 
limits of knowledge . ways of expression ? such as mathematical 
foraalae, language, and art, and their involvement in the knowing 
precessj the natar© of t&e relation betr#m the icaowing subject 
and the known object, 
3 class hours* Credit, 3. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS 
List of Professional Appointments, Promotions, Retirements, .Resignations 

January 1 - December 31 , 1951 

APPOINTMENTS 

Gordon D. Arnold, Assistant Physician, $5,160, September 1, 1951 

Esther E. Berges, Assistant Professor, Home Economics, s£4,140, Sept-,1,1951 

Bernard P. Bussel, Instructor, Mathematics, 03,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

David R. Clark, Instructor, English, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Reynold B. Gzamecki, Assistant Professor, Bacteriology, $4,140, Septal, 1951 

Alice J. Davey, Instructor, Home Economics, $3*300, Sept., 1 ? 1951 

Mrs* Marron S. DuBois, Instructor, English, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Thomas H. Farr, Instructor, Entomology, $3,300, Sept, I, 1951 

Tsuan H„ Peng, Instructor, Civil Engineering, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

William F. Field, Director of Guidance, $4,140, Sept. 1, 1951 

Robert V, Ganley, Instructor, Forestry, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Ulr'.ch K. Goldsmith, Associate Professor, German, $4,800, Sept. 1,1951 

Sumner M, Greenfield, Instructor, Romance Languages, $3*300, Sept » 1,1951 

Edward D. Hall, Instructor, Chemistry, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Barbara B. Hanson, Instructor, Home Economics, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

William Co Kartnett, Jr., Instructor, Zoology, $3,660, Dec. 1, 1951 



William K. Hefner, Asst. Professor, Business Administration, $4,140, 
Sept. I, 1951 

Mrs, Marcia G. Hibbard, Instructor, Physical Education for Women, $3,300, 
Sept. 1, 1951 

Joseph F« Hill, Jr., Instructor, German, $3,300, Sept, 1, 1951 

Marshall C« Howard, Assistant Professor, Business Administration, $4,140, 
Sept. 1, 1951 

Kenneth W Johnson, Treasurer, $7,320, Dec. 1, 1951 






Ahmad A. Kheiralla, Instructor, Mathematics, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Frederick B. Lindetrom, Instructor, Sociology, $3,300, Feb* 1, 1951 

Henry N, Little, Associate Professor, Chemistry, $4,^800, Sept. 1, 1951 

James B. Ludtke, Instructor, 'Business Administration, $3,300, Sept. 1,1951 

Allan H. MaeLaine, Instructor, English, $3,300, Sept* 1, 1951 

Gerald J. MeLlndon, Assistant Professor, Landscape Architecture, $4,140, 
Sept. 1, 1951 

Albert P. Madeira, Instructor , English, $3, 300, Sept* 1, 1951 

Mrs. Floy V.Matth9WS,Assistant Professor,Psychology, $4,140, Sept. 1,1951 

William I. Matthews, Instructor, Governments $3,300, Sept, 1, 1951 

Ralph G. Mitchell, Instructor*, Animal Husbandry, $3,300 5 Sept. 1,1951 

William fi« Morgan,, Instructor , German, $3?300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Henry B. Peiree, Jr., Instructor, Speech, $3*300, Sept. 1^ 1951 

John W. Hhyne, Jr., Instructor, Chemistry , %650, Sep% b l,195i (Half time) 

Maida L, Biggs, Instructor, Physical Education "'or Women, $3,300, 
Fs-b.,1, 1951 

Mrs. Cletme M. fiotan, Instructor, Geology & Mineralogy, $3,300, Sept. 1,1951 

William ¥. Saunders, Instructor, Psychology, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Robert E. Sehraffrath, Instructor, Chemistry, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Edwin K. Sehempp, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, $4,140, 
Sept* 1, 1951 

Aaron J« Spector, Instructor, Psychology, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Zlna J, Tillona, Instructor, Romance Languages, $3,300, Sept* 1, 1951 

Robert G. Tucker, Instructor, SSnglish, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

John E, Tyler,, Jr., Instructor, Chsmistry, $1,650, Sept* 1, 1951 '(half time) 

William Weiner, Instructor, Economics, $3,300, Sept. 1, 1951 

Torrald R. Bertinuson, Instructor, Agronomy, &3,3CO, Sept. 1, 1951 
Jack E. Gray, Professor, Veterinary Science, $5,760, Sept. 1, 1951 



Louisa Po Guild, Instructor, Home Economics, $3,300 f , July 1,, 1951 

Portia A. Ierardi, Experiment Station Editor, $4,140, March 1, 1951 

William L. Ives, Instructor , Floriculture * $3,300, July 19, 1951 

Warrsn Litsky, Assistant Professor, Bacteriology, $4,140, Nov. 1, 1951 

Henry A. Pock, Instructor, Veterinary Science, $3,300, March 1, 1951 

Philip L, Rusden, Instructor, Shade Tree Lab, $3,300, March 1, 1951 

William E. Tomlinson, Jr., Assistant Professor, Shade Tree Lab* $4,140* 
Jan. 1, 1951 

E^enff ion jgflgjfig, 

Kirby M 9 Hayes, Professor, Food Technology, $5,760, March 1, 1951 

Anthony W. Sylstra, Professor, Poultry Pathology, &5,7&Q, April 1, 1951 

H. Sidney Vaughan, State County Agent Leader, $6,060, April 1, 1951 

Boger A. Wolcott, Assistant Professor, Visual Aids, $4,320, Not, 1, 1951 

PROMOTIONS 

Instruction 

Maurice E. Bates, Head of D^parteont of M©chani.cal Engineering, from Professor 

Matthev L„ Blaisdell, Farm Superintendent, From Assistant Professor 

Lawrence E. Briggs, Associate Professor of Physical Education from 
Assistant Professor 

William G„ Colby, Mead of Department of Agronomy, from Professor 

Dorothy Davis, Assistant Professor of Home Economics, from Instructor 

Llewell^m L Derby, Associate Professor of Physical Education, Prom 
Assistant Professor 

Fred C Ellert, Head of Department of German, from Professor 

Charles F» Fraker, Head of Department of Romance Languages^ from Professor 
George Goodwin, Assistant Professor of Government, from Instructor 

Harold M« Gore, Head of Department of Physical Education for Men, from 
Professor 

Robert Stoddart Hopkins, Jr., Professor, from Associate Professor 
(College Title: Dear of Men) 



Robert B. Livingston, Associate Professor of Botany, from Assistant 
Professor 

Claude C. Nest, Head of Department of Psychology, from Professor 

Paul A. Procopio, Assistant Professor of Horticulture, from Instructor 

Joseph R. Bogers, Jr., Associate Professor of Physical Education, from 
Assistant Professor 

Frank R, Shaw, Associate Professor of Entomology. £s$p 
Assistant Professor 






Sidney SehoeffXer, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, from 
Instructor 



Ruth J. Totman, Professor of Physical Education for \taaen, from Associate 
Professor 

Merit P. White ? Head of Department of Civil Engineering, from Professor 

Leonard R. Wilson, Head of Department of Geology & Mineralogy, from 

Professor 



Chaster E. Gross, Associate Professor, Cranberry Station, from Assistant 
Professor 

m Bo Esselen, Jr., Professor, Food Technology, from Associate 

Professor 

William H. Laehman, Associate Professor, Vegetable Gardening, from 

Assistant Professor 

William So Mueller, Associate Professor, Dairy Industry, from Assistant 
Professor 

Leonard R„ Parkinson, Assistant Professor, Food Technology, from Instructor 

Control Ssr^cg. 
Jessie L Anderson, Assistant Professor, Seeds, from Instructor 
Olga M. Olesiuk, Assistant Professor, Poultry Disease, from Instructor 

C„ Tyson Smith, Associate Professor, Feeds and Fertilisers, from 

Assistant Professor 



DEATHS 

Charles N. DuBois, Assistant Professor of English, August 14, 1951 

Arthur N„ Julian, Head of Department of German, August 11* 1951 

RETIREMENTS 

Paul W B Dempsey, Assistant Professor, Research, Horticulture, Qct„31, 1951 

Oliver 3. Flinty Assistant Professor, Besearch, Poultry Disease, 
Oct. 31, 1951 

Robert Dorman Hawlsy, Treasurer of the University, Dec. 31, 1951 

John B, Lent 25, Head of Department of Veterinary Science, Jan. 31, 1951 

Millard A. Munson,, Director of Intension Service, Jan* 31, 1951 

Mrs. Esther C. Page, Extension Specialist ? Home Economics, April 13, 1951 

William G. Vi&al, Professor of Nature Education, tfov, 30, 1951 

Basil B. Vood, Librarian, Dec. 31 1 1951 

RESIGNATIONS 

Ralph W Ames, Assistant Professor, Research, Botany? Nov, 30, 1951 

Earl J* Anderson, Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering, Jan, 31, 1951 

Betty A. Bachman, Instructor, Research , Poultry Disease, Dec. 21 s 1951 

Carlton A. Bricknell, Instructor, Botany, June 30, 1951 

Carlos A. Caamano, Instructor, Romance Languages, June 30, 1951 

Norman C, Card, Jr., Instructor, Mechanical Engineering, August 31 , 1951 

Charles E. Carver, Jr., Instructor, Civil Engineerings August 31* 1951 

John M, Dickerman, Assistant Professor, Research, Bacteriology, 
Sept, 11, 1951 

Mrs. Charlotte G* Diets, Instructor, Research, Home Economics, June 5*1951 

Gordon Donald, Jr., Assistant Professor, Business Administration, Aug. 31>1951 

William R» Dy/aond, Assistant Professor, Business Administration, Aug, 31* 1951 

Fern A. Goulet, Instructor, Research, Control Service, May 25, 1951 

Mary N. Harmon, Instructor, Physical Education for Women, Aug<>31*1951 

Sherman Hoar, Assistant Professor, Business Administration, Augo31,1951 



Associate Professor, Botany, August 31, 1951 

bant Professor, Home Economics, August 31, 1951 

.£, Instractor, Kleetrlc&l Enginesring, Oct. 30, 1 

Mrs- Barbae Judge, Instructor, Research, Agricultural Economics, 
1 20, 1951 






>r, Psychology, Aug* 31, 1951 

.lessor j. Bas-kerioXegy 
, English, 

■ ieeri< . 3 i 

icis P« 'instructor, Economics, -&ug« 

UiUlaz& H. Needhasa, Im tor, Business Administration j Aug. 31, 1951 

SlXlot S* Pleres, Instructor, Chemistry, Aug, 31, 1951 . 

Stanley E 6 Polchlopek, Instructor, Chemistry, Aug, 31, 1951 

James Bobertscn, Jr , Associate Prc&ssor of Landscape Architecture, 
j. 31, 1951 



William ^. Konan, Instructor, Psychology, Aug* 31, 1951 

Allen M s Sie¥ers s Associate Professor, Business Administration, Augo3X,195i 

Eoberfc M, Thomas, Instructor, German, Aug* 31, 1951 

James T„ Timber-lake, Instructor, Animal Husbandry, Aug* 31, 1951 

Bobert A. Turner, Associate Professor^- Chemistry, Aug. 31 t 1951 

George A* Van Hern, Extension Editor, September 22, 1950-, 

Ig. 31/; 1951 



FACULTS CHi&GES SUCE BI3MB1R 31, 1951 

DEAJH 

Pran G« Boyd, Sxtensloa Professor of Plant Pathology, January 5* 1952 

EESKBATIOHS 

Esther E* Bergoa, Assistant Professor of Homo Bco-ncaaics* January 30, 1952 
William A .Mitchell, Associate Professor of ' Govoroaent, January 31 , 1952 

nm j&ppoimmsts 

fiobert A D Bennett, Instructor in Veterinary Science, February U 9 1952, $3,720 

William M„ Grimsfcaw, Professor of Recreation, January 28, 1952, $6, ISO 

Opal D* Stech, Assistant Professor of Home Economics, February 1, 1952, #3*720 

Charles C. O'Eourke, Head Coach, February 1, 1952, $6180 

Experiment Station 

Sugene Co Ga@iorkieid.os, Assistant fiesearch Professor of Botany, February 1, 1952, 
$4,560 



FACTS MD FIGUPSS REGARDING MEDICAL SCHOOLS 

Com. Ralph Saber, Leonard Garmichael, Alden 
Brett, William M. Cashing Ohaiman 

Submitted, to Board of Trustees, university of Massachusetts 

February 14, 3.952 



There are two associations which have to do with the medical 
profession in this country, namely, A.M. A. (American Medical Association) 
and the A.A.M.C. (Association of American Medical Colleges). 

Xn 1949 there was a meeting of the Deans in Sun Valley; at this 
meeting a Dr,, Anderson, who is Secretary of the Council on Medical Educa- 
tion and Hospitals of the A.M. A., formerly Dean of -the B. 0„ School of 
Medicine, advised (his own opinion) that there were enough doctors, maybe 
too many* Since that time, however, it is claimed that the A.M. A. does 
admit a shortage of doctors. 

In contrast to "this, Dr<» Parran, Surgeon Qen* of the 0*. S«» in 
speaking for the A.A.M.C., said that they were about 100$ short on doctors. 
His theory ^Keep the people well by means of preventive medicine 11 - 
this in contrast to the A.M. A, which advocates "Corrective medicine" • 
The A«M«A* claims that one doctor can do the work of three doctors, because 
of new methods and medicinej for instance, pneumonia, which was considered 
almost fatal, -is now treated merely as a cold, because of the marvelous 
drugs now at the disposal of the doctors. 

It is interesting to note, that in this country there are 28,000 
individuals in pre-msdical schools, yet there are only 7200 places in 79 
medical schools. The 79 medical schools, incidentally, consist of 72 four- 
year courses and 7 two-year courses. From these figures, therefore, we 
find that one out of four may study medicine. For instance, two years ago 
at Georgetown University, there were more than 3000 applicants for ISO 
places. 

In 1900, with a population of 75,000,000, there were 169 medical 
schools in this country* In 1949* with a population of 150,000,000, there 
were but 79 medical schools. In 1909 there was one doctor, for ^very 568 
people, while in 1949 there was one doctor for every 760. 

In other words, at the present time, we have quality in contrast 
to an' appalling over-production of under-educated and incompetent M»D<,s. 

In 3.910, Dr. N. P* Colwell, of A.M. A. Council, visited all of 
the 155 medical schools in the U. S. As a result of his findings, medical 
schools from that time, continued to get better. 






re in Massachusetts, for instance, a man with a certificate from 
) State, was not accepted without examination, until about five years ago, 
this, because of the fact that two of the then existing £ive medical schools 
were not considered as Grade "A w , 

Recently, Dr„ Howard A. Hist, Chairman of the Health Resources 
Cosanu of the National Security Besources Board, told the medical school Deans, 

t his counuittee estimated the need of 210,600 active physicians by 1954* 
That means 32,600 more than at present, and 22,000 more than present educa- 
tional schedules can provide. Dr. Franklin D, !*furphy, who is Dean of the 
medical school at the University of Kansas, in his article "Ve need mors 
Doctors (}fey 26, 1951) said that he believed that these figures were on the 
high side, because -of possible requirements of the Armed Forces « He claims 
that ting 79 medical schools are alive to the problem and in the 

st 3.0 years, they increased their enrollment by 5*000, to an all time high 
of 26, 193 • Now, with 6,000 graduating last June and the largest freshman 
class in history, 7,1$7, finishing its first year, it looks, as though these, 
medical schools are taxed to capacity. Some seem to think that the medical 
profession is deliberately holding down the number entering its ranks, in 
3 maintain an artificial shortage, or a. profitable sellers* market, 
"Less doctors and more sick people" • 

:-# Murphy, in his recommendations for more doctors, and assuming 
t we did need, ^h em, offered four methods, namely? 

No, 1 - Build new schools 

2 - Expand existing schools to accommodate 

more students 
3- Make further efforts to reduce number who 

B flUBk out !J « 
4, - Accelerate curriculum, telescoping four 

years to three, etc. 

The most expensive and the slowest, is the first method, yet, in this cat©** 

■ry, the University of Washington graduated its first class in 1950 j the 
University of California t,A», is in the planning and building stage. They 
iect to receive the first students in 1953 • Tae Mississippi State Legis- 
aire appropriated 14,000,000 last year to create a four-year medical school 
won. In New Jersey, a Governor's Committee recommended a medical and 
dental school be added to the State University (Rutgers) at a cost of 

J,0b0,000» State owned schools have also been proposed for Connecticut 
and Florida, 

At a recent meeting', Dr. Van Meter mentioned Federal Aid, This 
is now before Congress for the third time. The Senate Bill, which the A,A.M,C, 
Deans want, would help schools on an annual capitation basis - #500 per stu- 
dent already enrolled, and $1,000 per student to be added through expansion. 
Scholarships would be provided, and there is a sum of ^10,000,000 to be used, 
to match funds raised \sj schools for new construction, etc. The bill is an 
emergency measure for four years. It does not permit the Government to sub- 
sidize any school for more than &Q% of its budget. The bill would be adminis- 
tered by the Surgeon General of the If, S, Public Health Service, 



-3< 



The Deans are not anxious to sell schools into Bt&remieratic 
control, but they believe that the measure Is get up in such a way that 
schools can be helped without being n kept ?! . for years, medical schools 

ive been receiving research grants from the Public Health Service 
(last year $13*000*000* plus 113,500*000 for construction* training* 
fellowships* etc* was given)* 

On the other hand* the A,M,£, has proposed an alternative to 
Government support, Last year the National Medical Foundation was formed 
to raise money among M#D»s themselves - t-500,0Q0 given hy A,M,A,* 
California gave $100*000 and now the plan is to tax $100 per year on every 
one of the 20*000 members, active and retired, this 120*000*000 to be in- 
fused into the budgets of existing medical schools and thug reduce deficit. 

As far as tuition is concerned* the average is about #900 per 
student* Harvard $900* Tofts $900* Georgetown |800* etc* Colorado* inei- 
dentally* charges $2*000 per year for all students from outside of the 
•State, 

This represents less than half of the actual cost* which is 
vscximatejy $2*200 or more per year. 

For instance* in March* 1950* a voluntary committee* headed fcy 
Herbert Hoover* investigated medical schools in the U. S. The report said 

that many medical schools are parasites on the universities* drawing off 
so many funds that other fields are suffering. Some are wondering about 
the advisability of keeping medical schools open. This committee claims 
that tuition covers only 25$ of the Dr,s education. In 1910 tuition 
covered 70$ of the cost} in 1950* it covered 25$ , 

In 1941? educational expenses for all medical schools amounted 
to 126*300*000, In 19/$ it was almost twice that amount - 151*600*000. 

Of the 7$ medical schools* 4& operated at a. deficit during that 
year. Today <j it is claimed "that there are few* if any, operating at a 
profit. To combat this continuous loss, medical schools may syphon off 
funds from the rest of the university, or cut the 'budget and impair the 
quality of instruction, or reduce facilities. 

Reasons for this increased cost ares 

3So, 1 lowered income from private giving* Taxes, 
Z Decline in income from endowment* 
3 Sharp rise in operating costs. 

4. Revolutionary discoveries in medical science 
in chemistry ». physics* biology* psychology, 

5, Bedside teaching requiring full-time teachers 
rather than a 'few hours spent fcy practicing 
physicians. Less lecture and book work* which 
is cheap. 



-4- 



To summarize the approximate costs of starting a medical op 
dental school, it is interesting to note that the University of 
California is spending approximately $50,000,000 at the present time. 
In contrast' to that, medical men claim that at least fifteen millions 
of dollars are required as a starter. Dean F. Smiley, who is Secretary 
of the Association of American Medical Colleges, on April 4, 1950, wrote 
to Dr« ?an Meter and estimated that the average expenditure per student 
in all 79 medical schools, was $2,577. 



i 



CCH -52 



Qui* Committee ob Ccxamonwealth Scholarships recommends that for the 
University year 1951-52 Commonwealth Scholarships of $25® each be awarded fcgr 
the Board of Trustees to the .following students? 



Clg BJ of 1952 



Allen, Halsey !•* 
Norman 
,pp, Charles S. 
.ane^', George T» 

•dnof-' 111am V, 
Gunn, Ray M« 

McCaffrey , Edwin 
,.ne ? Charles M. 
Mints, Arthur L. 
Moshier, Charles M. 
$ylen, Per 
Pieropan, Albert L« 
Prevey, William G. 
Pyne, John S. 
Stephens j George E» 

lor ? Charles F* 
Vivaldi* Isadora L* 



Fltehburg 

Gardner 

t Sterling 

tsfieid 
ftold 
.ockbridge 
Charlton Depot 

nulnster 

renee 
Mattamn 
,Mnton 

t Bridgewai 
Vest Stockbridgo 
North Adams 
Melrose 
Agawam 
Randolph 
North Adams 



Coughlin* Bath E» 
Ferson, lean B. 
Flaherty, Barbara J« 
Machaiek, Cecilia G» 
Messier, Jacqueline 
Milaadri, Viola 
Peterson, / 



Middleboro 
Southbridg® 

,. dreenfleld 

/*Holyoke 

Boston 
Neodham 



tss o 



Cauley, Thomas S* 
Conway, Pdchard A. 
Flood , David J« 
Galas so , Francis S. 
Groves, Arthur D. 
Reywood, Donald 
Leavitt, Alan V* 
Marcotte , Vic tor *M * 
Nelson, Malcolm B* 
Powers, Joseph 
Pitzi, diaries F. 
Rcsenfield, Daniel 
Sounders, Herbert F, 
'Selfridge, Fred F. 
Soltys, John J., Jr. 
Thimot, Robert P. 
Vreeland, James B. 



Butler, Pdchard W. 
Cogan, Harold L. 
Duello, George 
Filiault, Edward A. 
Friedman, Burton S« 
Gaetz, Charles J. 



Kolyoke 

Quincy 

Norwood 

Monson 

Sbelbarne Falls 

Coh&sset 

Fr&raingham 

Russell 

Hopedale 

Fall River 

Worcester 

Dorchester 

Randolph 

Nabnasset 

Holyoke 

Hudson 

Middlefield 



Anderson, Soisya 
Davis, Jeanne tte G« 
Goorgantas 9 Alice 
Mixson, Alida D* 
NorcroBS, G. Elaine 
Perry, Helen T. 
Roclsvood, Margaret 
Rogers , Frances L„ 



SasuyM 



Whitman 
Framingham 
New Bedford 
North Adams 
Chelsea 
Leominster 



Bean, Barbara 
Bean, Marilyn 3, 
Donega, Helen M. 
Jones, Frances I»< 
Melamed, Ina 
Motte, Nancy J» 



Orange 

Sastha&ptoa 

Brockton 

Falmouth 
*3outhville 
W&lthas 
W&lpole 
Paxton 



North Dartmouth 

Florence 

North Adams 

Middleboro 

Chelsea 

Dedhas 



Clajs^oQig^lcontinvted) 



B. 

■••- 






. 



w 






mey, C 
i„ J oh: 

A, 
Christia Id \h 

Clark; Robert J« 

i 
Cornell* wrenc© E. 
.as* Joel F„ 

frso> Stephen 
Jacintho* Joseph ?«. 
XAvas; Roger T* 
Fatrie^ James H* 

Idallji, George T*., Jr. 
Waterman^ Chandler H# 



igfleld 
'lis 



chj Betty M. 
St. >lnia 



me Fallf 

k 





B„ 










Haverhill 






Pittsfle 






Leoainsfr 






Haverhill 






- 






Fit- 






Glass of 3^55 






StC9 


Belval* Carol 


Whitlnsville 


irer 


Cole.; -Loraine 


Saxozrcille 


Boston 


Conroy^ Ellen 


reat Barringt< 


Worcester 


Cooney, Martha A- 


:¥ell 


Whitman 


Gaudette, Helen© R* 


South Granby 


Holyoke 


Haeniech; Hiith B* 


LeosBlnster 


Cambridge 


Mayer ? Barbara J* 


■ringf ield 


Westport 


0» Donnelly Ceil M, 


Holyoke 


erhill . 


Pruyne^ Jean £• 


ittafield 


fcawrence 


Sargent , Sally A. 


Worcester 


Middieboro 






Wakefield 






Aldenville 






Hyanni© 






Athol 




■.. 



/b/ IM* L. Maehnor* Chairman 
/a/ Bobert S. Hop 
/b/ M, 0» Lanphe 
/s/ Helen 



fRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 14, 1952, 11:00 A.M., Butterfield Dormitory, Amherst, Mass, 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



165 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Haigis, Cashin, 
McDermott, Brovn, Crowley, Broderick, 
Hubbard, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter and Chairman 

Bartlett, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To adopt the attached changes in the By- 
Laws of the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts. The purpose of these 
changes is to redefine the duties of the 
Treasurer in view of the fact that the Uni- 
versity has a new position of Business 
Manager, and also to add to the list of 
officers of the University certain offices 
which have been created since the last By- 
Law change. 

It was 

70TED : To authorize and direct the Treasurer of 

the University to continue with his present 
duties until a Business Manager is appointed. 

Chairman Bartlett said that he had worked with the Presi- 
dent, Treasurer and Secretary of the University in drafting a defi- 
nition of duties of the Business Manager and after discussion, it 



By-Law 
Changes 



was 



VOTED : To define the duties of the Business Manager 
as follows: 

"Under the direction of the President, the 
Business Manager shall have oversight of the 
buildings, grounds and property of the Uni- 
versity including operation and maintenance 
thereof and shall have supervision of housing 



Business 
Manager 



1660 



TRUSTEE 



Business 
Manager Bonded 



Trustee 
Committee to 
Interview Candi- 
dates for Busi- 
ness Manager 



Machmer, ¥. L. 

Honorary 

Degree 



Resolution on 
Ralph F. Taber 



Commonwealth 
Scholarship 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and transportation. He shall be responsible 
for the operation of the boarding halls and 
the University Store; for the maintenance of 
the University personnel records including 
sickness and accident reports and the pro- 
cessing of retirement papers; and for the 
hiring and discharge of personnel in the ser- 
vices under his jurisdiction. He shall also 
have such other duties as the President or 
the Trustees shall designate." 

It was 

VOTED : To require that the Business Manager be 
bonded . 

It was 

VOTED : To request the Chairman to appoint a 

committee of three including the Chairman 
of the Board to interview candidates for 
the position of Business Manager and to 
make recommendation to the full Board. 
Chairman Bartlett appointed the following 
committee in accordance with the preceding 
vote: Trustees Cashin, Brett and Bartlett. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED : To award the honorary degree Doctor of Laws 
to Dean William L. Machmer at the 1952 
Commencement. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED : To adopt the enclosed resolution of appre- 
ciation of the services of Ralph F. Taber 
and to direct the Secretary to inscribe 
this resolution in the records of the 
Board and to send copy to Mr. Taber. 

President Van Meter said that after all the new Common- 
wealth scholarships had been awarded for the current year, one stu- 
dent who received a scholarship withdrew from the University. He 
recommended that the Trustees consider the advisability of re- 
awarding this scholarship to a needy and deserving student even 
though, the college year is almost over. After consideration, it was 

VOTED : To award a Commonwealth scholarship in 

the amount of $250 to William C. Koch, Jr. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of Treasurer Johnson and President 
Van Meter, it was 

VOTED; To approve the attached policy as to refund 
of payments to students. 

President Van Meter said that for some years women stu- 
dents of the University have been required to purchase their own 
Physical Education uniforms in addition to paying the standard 
athletic fee required of all students. 

The men have also paid the athletic fee but have been 
furnished uniforms for required Physical Education by the Univer- 
sity. This has seemed unfair to the women students and has been a 
drain on the athletic fund. After discussion and on the recommenda- 
tion of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : That beginning in the fall of 1952 entering 
male freshmen be charged a $10.00 Physical 
Education laboratory fee to cover the cost 
including laundry of uniforms used in the 
required Physical Education program during 
the freshman and sophomore years with the 
understanding that the same type of uniform 
will be available at no cost to upperclassmen 
for intramural or other approved athletic 
use. 

It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the President to waive the $10.00 
Physical Education laboratory fee for male stu- 
dents who are excused from participation in the 
required Physical Education program and who do 
not use Physical Education uniforms. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Norman ¥. Butterfield as Extension 
Professor of Floriculture effective March 1, 
1952 at annual salary of |6lS0. 



1661 



Refund 
Policy 

Athletic 
Fee 



Physical 

Education 

Uniforms 



Butterfield, 
Norman ¥. 



1662 



TRUSTEE 

Montgomeiy, 
Hugh 



Refunds on 
Room Rent 



Budget 



Suppl emen tary 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Hugh Montgomery as Librarian 
effective August 1, 1952 or as soon 
thereafter as he reports for duty at 
annual salary of $6180. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that when students were 

assigned to rooms in the fall of 1951, it was hoped that Baker 

dormitory would be ready soon. While reconstruction was underway, 

some students were crowded into the other dormitories beyond 

normal capacity and assured that if Baker dormitory should not be 

opened soon, they would be given some rebate on their room rents in 

accordance with the previous policy of the Board. After discussion 

it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to make refunds 
on room rent retroactive to September 17, 
1951 on the basis of an annual rate of $120 
to students who have been doubled up in the 
dormitories but who have paid the rate for 
normal occupancy. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the 1953 maintenance 
budget of the University has just been passed by the Legislature 
and signed by the Governor in an amount of $5,213,601. This com- 
pares with $5,979,953 originally requested by the Trustees. 

There was discussion as to the ability of the University 
to carry on with this appropriation and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to submit 
a supplementary budget for 1953 requesting 
$330,34-0 for maintenance and $42,760 as a 
special appropriation to finance reimbursable 
research contracts with agencies of the 
Federal Government. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve location of a proposed green- 
house addition to Clark Hall of approxi- 
mately 25 feet in length extending 
westerly from the southwest corner of 
the present greenhouse attached to Clark 
Hall. 

It was 

/OTED; To authorize the Treasurer to sign a con- 
tract with the lowest eligible and responsible 
bidder for the construction of an addition to 
the greenhouse at Clark Hall provided a bid 
is received that is within the funds available 
for this purpose in the "Repairs, Alterations 
and Additions" account. Mr. Johnson reported 
that the cost of this greenhouse is estimated 
at approximately $8,000. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the North America 

(Insurance) Companies have recently appraised the insurable value 

of Memorial Hall which is presently insured for $125,000 and have 

placed the insurable value at $230,000. The company now carrying 

the insurance has recommended that the present policy which covers 

damage from lightning and fire be extended to include insurance 

against the perils of windstorms, hail, explosion, riot, riot 

attending a strike, civil commotion, aircraft, vehicles and smoke. 

The Trustees did not agree as to the need for this extended 

coverage as the building is heated from the central heating plant 

of the University which means that there is little damage from 

explosion. It was 

fOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to increase the 
lightning and fire insurance coverage on 
Memorial Hall to $230,000. 



83 



In view of the increased inventory of military property, 



it was 



VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to increase the 
military property bond from $300,000 to 
$350,000. 



Clark Hall 
Greenhouse 
Addition 



Memorial Hall 
Fire Insurance 



Military 
Property Bond 



1664 



TRUSTEE 



Bonds, Sale of 



Endowment 
Funds 



Pooled 
Funds 



Securities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee and the Treasurer to sell 20 
shares of Royal Typewriter Co. 7% Preferred 
and to invest the proceeds therefrom in 
common stock of American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To continue to hold all other stocks ex- 
cept the Royal Typewriter 7% Preferred. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the pooling of all Endowment 
Funds of the University of Massachusetts 
for the purpose of investment, except where- 
in the terms of a particular endowment 
would definitely prohibit such pooling; 
that income from pool investments shall be 
recorded in an account called "Undistributed 
Income on Pooled Investments" and that 
periodically the income recorded in this 
account shall be allocated among the par- 
ticipating funds on the basis of the rela- 
tive contributions of each endowment fund 
to the total of the pool investments, said 
allocated income to be available for use 
in accordance with the terms of the original 
bequest. Profits on the sale of pool in- 
vestments are to be recorded in an account 
entitled "Reserve for Profits and Losses on 
Pool Investments" and such funds should be 
invested and maintained permanently as a 
safeguard against loss of principal on pool 
investments and the earnings should be added 
thereto. Losses on sale of pool investments 
are to be charged to this fund. The Chair- 
man of the Finance Committee and the 
Treasurer are authorized to take the 
necessary action to effectuate this policy 
and make it operative. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it w T as 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer upon consultation 
with Mr. Haigis to invest approximately 
$25,000 of endowment funds in the following 
securities recommended by E. M. Whitcomb of 
the First National Bank of Amherst or in 
other bonds which carry an AA or AAA rating. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Approximate 
Price 



103 1/2 



American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
3 3/8' s due 1973, call price 
104.6 

Dominion of Canada 2 3/4 's due 1975 
payable in U. S. funds 

Commonwealth Edison Co. of Chicago 
1st 3's due 1977 

American Tobacco Co. deb. 3's due 
1969 

Continental Can Co. 3 1/4 ' s due 1976 
' call price 103 3/4 



Consumers Power Co. 3 3/3 's due 1931 100 7/8 



Yield 



3.13 



1665 



95 


3.02 


100 


3. 


99 3/4 


3. 


103 1/2 


3.05 



3.08 



Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED: That the Chairman of the Finance Committee 
and the Treasurer be authorized to include 
Government Bonds of nearly equivalent yield 
in the above list of securities and to take 
such action as may be required to convert 
or exchange present holdings of Government 
Bonds into new offerings of the Federal 
Government. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED ; To approve an award of $150 from the Charles 
S. Plumb Fund to Theodore Covert to help in 
financing a trip to Holland for the purpose 
of visiting farms and dairies. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To approve annual awards of $125 from the 
Plumb Fund to students recommended by the 
School of Agriculture until the available 
balance is reduced to less than $125 and 
to make further awards thereafter whenever 
the income is equal to or exceeds $125. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 



Charles S. 
Plumb Fund 



1666 



TRUSTEE 



Trust 
Funds 



Remington Rand 
Script 



Trust 

Funds 



Ascension Farm 
School Endow- 
ment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the Treasurer with the advice and 
consent of the Chairman of the Finance 
Committee be authorized to invest balances 
in the Trust and Agency funds of the Uni- 
versity in short-term U. g. Treasury Notes 
and Certificates, Certificates of Deposit, 
or short-term notes of the Commercial 
Credit Company when it appears that the 
total of all such Trust and Agency Funds 
exceed current demands on the funds. Any 
income derived from such investment shall 
be credited to the "Trust Fund Interest" 
account and be available for use in 
accordance with the policy for using 
other unearmarked trust fund income. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sell 

4.5/100 shares of Remington Rand script. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To approve the present cash investment 
of $42,115.14. in the Amherst Savings 
Bank. This now bears interest at 2 3/l$» 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to write off 
the accumulated petty cash shortage of 
$189.4.9 as shown in the cash audit of 
the State Auditor of December 31, 1951 
at the time that Treasurer Hawley re- 
tired. This write-off is to be accomplished 
by transfer to petty cash fund of $189.4-9 
from unearmarked trust fund balances. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To request the Treasurer to report petty 

cash overages and shortages to the Trustees 
at the end of each fiscal year. 

Upon the recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to make ex- 
penditures on proper voucher from the 
Ascension Farm School endowment in 
accordance with the terms as stated by 
the court in the transfer of this endow- 
ment fund to the University. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Registrar Lanphear presented the attached report on ad- 
missions as of May 15, 1952. 

Dr. Sieling, Dean of the School of Agriculture and 
Director of the Experiment Station, reported to the Trustees con- 
cerning the results of the survey of the Extension Service staff 
by the State Personnel Office. He said that the Personnel Office 
has recommended the degrading as they become vacant of twenty Ex- 
tension Service positions from the grade of Professor to lower 
grades. He said he felt the Extension program could not be 
operated with the grade of positions which the Personnel Office 
proposed. Chairman Bartlett requested that a specific recommenda- 
tion concerning this matter be brought to the Trustees on May 31 • 

It was agreed to meet during the week of June 23 in 
Boston to consider the University budget for the year beginning 
July 1, 1953. 

On the recommendation of President Van ^eter and the 

University Committee on Course of Study, it was 

rOTED ; To approve the attached new courses of 
study. 

Upon the recommendation of the President and of the 

University Committee on Course of Study, it was 

VOTED : To permit the all-University sophomore 

social science requirement to be met by the 
selection of six semester credits from among 
Sociology 23, Psychology 26 and Economics 26. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the President to expend a 

total of $1500 from unearmarked trust funds 
during the period July 1, 1951 to June 30, 
1952. 



1687 



Report on 

Admissions 



New 
Courses 



Social Science 

Requirement 



Unearmarked 
Trust Funds 



1668 



TRUSTEE 



Capital 

Outley 
Program 



was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Treasurer and President, it 



VOTED ; To approve a capital outlay budget for 
the year beginning July 1, 1952 in the 
amount of $2,450,000 including the 
following projects: 



1. Improvements to Bowker Auditorium 

2. Physical Education Improvements 

3. Improvements to Farm and Dairy 

Buildings 

4. Clark Hill and u ther Roads 

5. Remodeling of Paige Annex 

6. Improvement to Utilities 



7. Public Health Center 

8. Engineering Building 



$150,000 

75,000 

U5,000 

90,000 
16,000 

93,000 
$569,000 

1,031,000 

350,000 
$2,4-50,000 



The meeting was adjourned at 5:00 P.M. 




Secretary 



Pre J 



Chairman 



RUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 31, 1952, 10:30 A.M., Butterfield Hall, Amherst, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Mrs. McNamara, Brown, Crowley, 
Tvhitmore, Orton, Carmichael, 
McDermott, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 
reading of the minutes of the last meet- 
ing. 

On the recommendation of the faculty and of the President 



166 



it was 



VOTED : To award the following degrees to those 
candidates as listed on the attached 
corrected Commencement program for 1952, 



239 


Bachelor of 


141 


Bachelor of 


63 


Bachelor of 


3 


Bachelor of 


3 


Bachelor of 


22 


Bachelor of 


24- 


Bachelor of 


37 


Bachelor of 





Bachelor of 



Science 

Arts 

Business Administration 

Science in Agricultural Engineering 

Science in Chemical Engineering 

Science in Civil Engineering 

Science in Electrical Engineering 

Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Vocational Agriculture 



539 



On the recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate 
School and the President, it was 



Degrees 



VOTED: 



To award the following degrees to those 
candidates as listed on the Commencement 
program for 1952. 



75 
9 
U 



Master of Science 

Master of Arts 

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 

Doctor of Philosophy 



101 



1670 



TRUSTEE 



M'lchrner, W. L. 
Honorary Degree 
in Absentia 



Bond for 
Business 
Manager 



Flagged 
Positions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Van Meter said that since the Board had voted 
to award an honorary degree Doctor of Laws to Dean Machmer, the 
Dean had become ill and would not be able to attend the Commence- 
ment exercises. The Trustees requested the Secretary to express 
to Dean Machmer their sympathy in his illness, their happiness 
that he is improving in health, and their gratitude for his con- 
stant devotion to the development and maintenance of the high 
academic standards which have brought the University its enviable 
reputation among American colleges and universities. Thereupon, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To confer the honorary degree, Doctor 

of Laws, upon Uilliam Lawson Machmer in 
absentia at the 1952 Commencement. 

It was 

VOTED: To fix the separate bond for the 

Business Manager of the University at 
$10,000. 

There was discussion of the positions in the School of 

Agriculture and Horticulture which are scheduled to be reduced in 

rank as a result of the survey by the State Personnel Office. 

This reduction in rank is scheduled to occur as certain positions 

are vacated. It was 

VOTED ; To refer the question of these "flagged" 

positions in the School of Agriculture and 
Horticulture to the Trustee Committee on 
Agriculture and Horticulture for study and 
recommendation to the full Board. 

President Van Meter reported that the Gamma Chapter of 

Alpha Sigma Phi has offered to sell its lot to the University. 

The corporation has given up hope of erecting a fraternity house 

and is planning to disband. The lot consists of approximately 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



37,890 square feet of land bounded on the north by Clark Hill 
Road and on the west by Stoekbridge Road. After discussion, it 



?USTEE 



was 



VOTED : To refer the possible purchase of the 
Alpha Sigma Phi lot to the Trustee 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds for 
study and recommendation to the full 
Board. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 P.M. 




1671 



Alpha Sigma 
Phi Lot 












Secretary 



Chaiiman 



167X 



TRUSTEE 



Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 26, 1952, 5:45 P. M ., Hotel Statler, Boston 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



JRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, McNamara, 
Desmond, Whitmore, Deely, McDermott, 
Brown, Crowley, President Van Meter, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett announced that the Treasurer had sent 
copies of the proposed University budget for 1954- to all Trustees 
Several days in advance of the meeting so that they might have 
opportunity to study the budget carefully and bring their recommen- 
dations and comments to the meeting. This budget was labeled 
"University of Massachusetts Budget for Fiscal Year July 1, 1953 
to June 30, 1954 for consideration of Board of Trustees, June 26, 
1952." 

President Van Meter reviewed the procedure by which the 
budget is prepared at the University and Treasurer Johnson out- 
lined the details of the budget dated June 26, 1952 as forwarded 
to the Trustees. He pointed out that there are substantial in- 
creases over 1953 in the amount requested for the Boarding Hall 
because it is expected that the new Boarding Hall will be in 
operation in 1954 and more students will be served. Also, he 
pointed out that the total enrollment in the University, including 
the four-year course, the two-year Stockbridge program, and the 
Graduate School, will increase from 3700 students in the fall of 
1952 to 3900 students in the fall of 1953. 



Be it resolved that the Trusteed of tit© Ifriiverslty of 

SSssssehasetta express their strong appreciate o& of the outetsmUl&g 
record of aceoapilshz!a<$at 'of Ralph P» X*bar as a tfaiversitr Trastes 
from 1945 to 1952, 

■• As aa aXttssa&s, Mr. falser brought to the Board & keg® &&~ 
sight isito the asuds of the University « Zealoas for its str«®gth 
&&d repatatioa he walked emstaatl^ for ft broader earr£ealam» s& 
sfek eiid Icgp&l iS5P?tta of teachers * ftssd oa sdaiaistratioa that 
recognised the eh&ll«ttge of the ^ai-versi^*® @&als» 

Mr* Taker's saergv- end spirit, his friessdly and aedest 
pmmsltty, his eo&staat attsatioa to Raivsrsltgr problems gave 
iaspirati&& to Ms fellow trasteee. His services ea the Alaoni 
Dttil&ij&g Corporation, ©a the Baildiags asad Greuads Committee of the 
Trustees^ ea the legislative Coaalttse aa& the Fiaaace Ccisaittee 
were ever devoted to the task of the srestica of a greater 0aiv©rsitv 
of MsssaeSrasetts, 

The Traste^s esteem their gratitude aad their best wishes 
to Mr, Taker oa his retireaeat from the Soard* 



rjfc 1J .'•. 



. 



It sf the University be revised 

and am ?ss 



jnts will be granted of payments made to the University in 
the g policy. 



Ion and Fees 

. rjsa^> asms: 

A student who leaves th* :y for any reason except as 

a semester ii eted will be granted a 
j*8 in acco: se with the following schedules 



■ 

a. Within beginning of semester or term - I 

b* ®$ 

Du:. i week "- 20$' 

i week - no re: 

i 
Si ' 

> wr i.taeMc- ^ qaw ij 

a* Dor :©ek «. 60$ 

During s -jond \ « 20% 
Aft ond week - no x 

A stt • who makes an advance p it and then for any reason does hot 
any part of the next semester or tern at the University wil|, be given a \ 
.1 refund of tuition and 1 .,00 a e payment fee required of new 

not refundable* 

& student is involuntarily called Into military service before the'-. 

ar will be given a pro rata refund of tuition and fees pr> 
led that h no academic credit for the work of b seinestor* If 
aic credit is gives are will be \d« 






nepm 

It i. of the TJnive: that there will be no refund of prs~ 

semester h . ced except in tent who 

lunta: Litary service who will be on a pi 

Ls. * 

A studei in adv- f room rent who fails to 

attend any part of the next soueetc reside in a dormitory or 

,erit>ising wi full refu; d room rent* 

Board 

Prepaid board will be. refunded on a pro rata basis, 

1 student elled or suspended from the University for disciplinary 
reasons forfeits all be to a refund* 

'the F mov requests for refunds cot covered in the stated re- 

fund policy when there are shows to be extenuating circumstances* 



ftdmig :S'os of May 13 « 195 



5 ±ry?£. 



Al© 



St o 






1952 

1951 



instate - out-of-state Women:- in*»state 




129o 



69 



out-of-state. 

^6 




total 



2103 



?.• Selected for fi&mission 



1952 
1951 



621 

661 



32 
21 



j*53 
^32 



25 

23 



1131 
1137 



3® :'-'V: :; 



1952 

1951 



V19 

wo 



16 
12 



351 
3w 



19 

10 



805 
8k6 



B, Transfers 



1952 
1951 



Hens in- state 
2**7 

22*2' 



1. Applications Received 

out-of-state Women s in-st£ 
h2 ' 67 

35 



I 1 * 

19 



I 



The following new courses are referred to the Board of Trustees with 
the reccmm from the Course of Study Committee that they "be approved! 

j§2£&&2£SL£&* jpgJHfltl&gl Sociology. A study of the role, statu© and function 

of the worker in the i 2 community. A consideration of changing 

.■jhnology, result! :ig© and the ad,! eats made in the industrial 

community • 
3 class hours. Credit, 3» 

24* City Planning* A -critical examination of those 

itan ;« Open to nog-majors* 
3 class hour j Credit, .3* 

UB .--.SLZi- m&LM; k» & 3 principles of 

mof sivic art through >f problems on the design of various types of 
urban land ► . . 
3 2-hour la -io&s* Credit, 3* 

These two courses replace present Lsndscr . ?ehi tec tore 76 which is dropped, 

16. Finite Differences ^MProbabilit^;. (To be given in alternate 

irs»)- 

3 class hours. Credit, 3. 

M athematic s £3. C omputational Methods* Errors and approximations In computation, 
methods of approximating roots of equations, approximation of functions, em- 
pirical curve fitting, approximate integration, and numerical integration of 

Unary differ- .1 equations, (To-be given in alternate years.) 
3 class hours* • Credit, 3» 

Expand Mathematics 65 to 

Majyiemtic &J&.*. 51, . Higher Algebra. Permutations, combinations, probability! 
mathematical ind rices, determinants , Lnear equations and dependence; 
quadratic . forms and elimination theory j the complex number system? polynomial 
equations i elementary theory of groi rings and field 
3 class hours* .... Credit, 3« 

J&p&nd Mathematics 9A to Mathematics 93 and 94 

Mi-Cj 93. Advanced Calculus* The real number system, sequences, 
elesac VEf.9f.Q e of oue.^yari&l^Le ;54id_ of _ sever/, 

.emannian Integra. ts 
3 class hour, t 3» 

MiJtomM^sJM* MH§J^ . &&&&U&. Double apd triple integrals, improper in* 
tegrals, gamma fV >ns, Beta functions* eXiiotic functions, calci :<f 
variations, Fourier' series, Laplace' Transfer;- . 

3 class hours* . Credit, 3« „ 

Mathematics 7A. Thooryof Numbers . Euclid's Algorism, Theory of Prime Numbers- 

Aliquot parts, congruences, further topics in Humber Theory, (Given in alternate 

years.) 

3 class hours. 

Credit 3. 



Mr Jf curves *** * 

surfaces in is. alternate yeans,) 

i hours- Credit $ 3* 

Voted, ,tc s the combining of Chemistry 31 and 32 into a single course 
31, Lc Chemistry! 

. . Organic C] brv. ort course int$3 re- 

] do not specialise in chemistry. 

2 eh 

1 2-hour laborato: Credit, 

B course is i 
rahlic health. The mat 
gi tion ; ire 

re 
: 

edit, 

A si of the wee'' r, the . 

'm®& with training in copy~ 
rslty , 3d in 

3 class he Credit, 3» 

Motes: This cou: combination c oidard 

- (1) Oopyedr ; nd (2) :Xy 

Ec" y. 

It WO": * Lll_...J_ 

CG 

88* . with 






, ,; Li ■ 
3kf. 1 

■"■, 
1 laborai _ peri: Credit, 3« 

ss This course : § of texts 

lism courses ~ an 
iting text, a 
:,ai problem t ■ 11 as practice vc. ; 
on daily r . Alt he course Is 
for a few sa al for the. 

Ap 1 of the following "• and rear: ment n of the 
Lneering, Ele< . Lcula. 

^ception •- 1 Sag (not approved) * 

Copies of revised curricula and ations are attached. Apart from 
a rearrangement of certain course gut credit changes in a few others, 

there are these specific new courses which, should be .appr_oxe&. by -the.. ..trustees. 



Br 



E* £• &5 ~ Electrical Measurements. 

!•- E» 91 - Sfervcaechani 

E. S# 9& - Television Engineering., 

Mt B* 94. - Experimental Mechanical I&igineeris 



M. E. 3 - Descriptive Geometry 
1 90 - Illymin&tio 



\ 



Proposed Changes in the By-Laws of the Board of 
Trustees, University of Massachusetts , Amherst, 
Massachusetts 



On May H, 1952 the President of the University proposes to submit to 
the Board of Trustees the following recommended changes in* the %-Laws of the 
Board, The main purpose of the changes is to redefine the duties of the 
Treasurer so that certain duties vita which he is now charged may be delegated 
to the Business Manager of the University* A secondary purpose of the proposed 
changes is to add to the list of administrative officers of the University, the 
titles of certain new positions and to recognize changes in titles which have 
been made by the Board in the past* 

M^^IaJ^^JSSS^lA o f ^ lQ S* -Laws shall be deleted and in its place a 

new paragraph 2 shall read as follows? 

B The Treasurer shall have charge of the accounting and 
bookkeeping of the University) establishment of procedures, in- 
ternal audits and controls relating thereto j shall prepare financial 
reports; shall under the direction of the President of the University 
administer the expenditure of funds in accordance with the budget 
passed by the Legislature and signed by the Governor^ shall approve 
all purchases, and shall have such other duties as may be prescribed 
by the President of the University or voted by the Trustees. He shall, 
in the normal course of his duties, report directly to the President 
of the University** 

Article X ft paragraph ? of the By-Laws shall be deleted and in its place 
a new paragraph 3 shall read as follows? 

*Xn addition to being custodian of all the funds which 
belong to the University by acts of the Legislature, the Treasurer 
shall also receive and collect moneys and valuables due to the 
University from whatever source, and disburse the same* _The 
Treasurer may act as custodian for Student Iteposit Funds, J^vercment 
Funds, Research : Funds, and qi^erfu^s for y^c}^^^.^f^!^^^joAB. 

agreed to act as custodian. All payments_inyql-^.ng a .questips .of 

University policy shall first be approved tjy .the President.* 

Article VII f para graph 1. To the list of administrative officers of the 
University listed in Article 711 shall be . added the titles Assistant Treasurer, 
Business Manager, Dean of the College of Arts and Science, and Dean of School ♦ 
The title Director of the Graduate School shall be changed to Dean of the 
Graduate School, the title Director of the Experiment Station shall be changed 
to Dean of Agriculture and Director of the Experiment Station, the title 
Director of the Extension Service shall be changed to Associate Dean of Agri- 
culture and Director of the Extension Service^ To effect these changes, 
sentence 2 of Article 711 of the By-Laws shall be altered so as to read as 
follows 3 



»i .' ; 



"The administrative officers mentioned above shall be Dean 
of the University, Dean of Agriculture and Director of the Experiment 
Station, Associate" Dean of Agriculture "and "Director of _the S3cteneT6n"_ 
Service, Director of Short Courses, Dean of We Graduate" 
Treasurer of the University, Secretary of the University, Assistant 
Treasurer, Business Manager, Registrar of the University, Librarian 
of the University, Dean of the College of Arts and Science, Deans of 
Schools, Heads of Divisions and Departments, as may 1^ apjsqinted f rom 
time to time.* 



Article IX. The Business Manager of the University will be in 
charge of property and therefore property inventories from the departments 
should be forwarded to the Business Manager. 

Articl e IX A...J>a^raggs&nh...^. of the Ey-Lawg shall be altered so as to sub- 
stitute the words "Business Manager" for the word " "Treasurer 1 ' and shall then 
read as follows s 

"It shall be the duty of the Head of each Department, or 
his assistant, to take an inventory at the end of each year, of '. all 
apparatus and property belonging in the department, and to forward ~ 
this inventory to the Business Manager as a part of the accounts of 
the University, and in the case of the production departments, this 

inventory shall include an account of the stock and produce at a 

fair market valuation,, " 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion of the desirability of purchasing a 

tract of land adjoining the University campus and now owned by 

Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity and it was 

VOTED : To add an item of $4, 000 to the budget for 
the possible purchase of this land. 

Meantime Trustee Brett is checking with Dr. Goldthwait to 
see if the price might he reduced or if the land might be acquired 
other than by purchase with State Funds. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve a University budget for 1954- in 
the amount of $6,407,615 for general 
maintenance. 

Treasurer Johnson then presented the suggested University 
budget for special appropriations in the amount of $125,000, in- 
cluding $50,000 for support of an Engineering Research institute 
(of this amount $25,000 is for reimbursable government research), 
$50,000 for other reimbursable government research, and $25,000 for 
Commonwealth Scholarships. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the special appropriations budget 
for 1954 in the amount of $125,000 as pre- 
sented. 

The Trustees next considered the capital outlay budget 

for the University and it was 

VOTED : To move the Student Union Building up from 

the budget for the year 1957 and schedule it 
as the number one item under the 1955 capital 
outlay program. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the capital outlay budget for the 
University in the amount of $3,921,000 for 
1954 as follows: 



1673 



Alpha Sigma 

Phi 

Fraternity 



Capital Outlay 
Budget 

Student Union 
Building 



isn 



TRUSTEE 



Electrical 
Generating 
Plant 

Baker 
Dormitory 



Degree Master 
of Science in 
Civil Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1. Physical Education Building and 
Recreation Area for Women 

2. Addition to Chemistry Laboratory 
and Equipment 

3. Classroom Building - Arts and Science 
4.. Draper Hall Renovation 

5. Improvements to Steam Utilities 

6. Improvements to Electric Utilities 

7. Roads, Walks and Parking Areas 

8. Parking Area at Waltham 

9. Poultry Plant Improvements 



It was 



$1,500,000 

387,000 
1,000,000 

200,000 
84,000 

U7,000 
20,000 
10,000 

$3,921,000 



Faculty 

Assistant to 
Supervisor of 
Academic 
Activities 



VOTED : To request the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds to inspect the new Electri- 
cal Generating Plant and the Baker Dormitory 
and to report at the next meeting of the full 
Board or of the Executive Committee concern- 
ing the acceptance of these two new buildings. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter and the Dean 

of the Graduate School, it was 

VOTED ; To award the degree Master of Science in 

Civil Engineering to Kenneth Andrew LeClair 
as of June 1, 1952 instead of the degree 
Master of Science as previously awarded. 
Mr, LeClair has completed all the require- 
ments for the degree M.S. in Civil Engineer- 
ing and his name should have been so listed 
on the Commencement program. 

On the recommendation of the faculty committee on 

Academic Activities and of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the annual payment of $100 to 
a faculty assistant to the general super- 
visor of academic activities, payment to be 
made from Academic Activities Funds. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to expend not to 
exceed $1,500 from unrestricted Trust Funds 
during the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1952. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 



'RUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To authorize sabbatical leave for Dr. William 
G. Colby, Head of the Department of Agronomy, 
with full pay for the period March 15, 1953 
through September 15, 1953 to study forage 
crops and forage crop production and research 
in various sections of the United States, 
with the understanding that it will not be 
necessary to employ a substitute during 
Dr. Colby's leave. 

On the recommendation of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the discontinuance of the name 
Paige Laboratory for the building formerly 
used by the Veterinary Science Department 
and rename this building Munson Hall in honor 
of Villard A. Munson, retired Director of the 
Extension Service. 

On the recommendation of the University Scholarship 

Committee and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To award 25 Commonwealth Scholarships to 
freshman students in accordance with the 
attached list. 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Course of Study and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached list of new courses 
of study and changes in the program of study. 

On the recommendations of the Committee on Agriculture 

and Horticulture, it was 

VOTED : To support the classification of Extension 
Service employees in accordance with column 
3 of the "Report on Effect of Personnel Survey 
on Extension Service" dated May 12, 1952. 

The Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture recommended 

that the Trustees support Dr. Sieling's proposal for 4-3 weeks of 

service for members of the professional staff in Agriculture and 

request the Administration to attempt to work out a solution with 

the proper authorities. 



1675 



Colby, 

William G. 



sabbatical 
leave 



Munson Hall 



Commonweal th 
Scholarships 



New Courses 



Agricultural 
Teachers 



I6?3 



TRUSTEE 



Meeting of Assoc. 
of Governing 
Boards of Land- 
Grant Colleges 
and Allied In- 
stitutions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Bartlett said that he was unwilling to support 

this proposal without further study and additional information as to 

the possible effect on other departments of the University. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To request the Administration to work this 
problem out further and to report back to 
the Board of Trustees. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Agriculture 

and Horticulture, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to seek a 
ruling or legislation which would make it 
possible for county extension service em- 
ployees transferring to the University Ex- 
tension Service to have dredit financially 
for previous service rendered in the 
counties of Massachusetts on the same basis 
as if this previous service were rendered 
in the employ of the Commonwealth. 

It was 

VOTED : To request the Chairman to name a delegate to 
the annual meeting of the Association of 
Governing Boards of land-Grant Colleges and 
Allied Institutions. This meeting is to take 
place in Portland, Oregon, in October. Chair- 
man Bartlett named Trustee Whitmore as the 
official delegate. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 P.M. 



J/*J-7<L(/'.'lM' 



___J3ecretary 



A tf&t^W^ohM^ 



Chairman 



IPS 



It is recommended that the Trustee av&rti Cojnmonwea: 
Scholarships to the following raembers of the class of 1956? 



MM 



., Peter 3* St. John Street, Boston; Elec* Engineering 

HICK, Ronald B., " tland Ave., H. Chelmsford; Liberal Aria 
GARDINER, Donald S., 12 Concord Street $ Keedham Hgte.j Liberal Arts. 
GIBBS, Robert B., 55 School lue, Stoughton; Engineering 
KLIM, Robert G., 50 Clap: ;, Stoughton; Physical Education 
LSIGHTON, Robert D., 222 West Center St*, V. Bridgewater; Fbgineerl- 
MacLBISH, •' - W., 16 -off Hill Streets S. Weymouth; Science 

IN, Gorfcen, 64 Quebec Street, Indian Orchard ; Engineering 
O't ifAS, Michael ^., 206 Deerfield St., Greenfield; Science 

DUD, Robert 374 Soaervill© Ave., SosnerYille; Engineering 
RIB] awl H., 51 Hitehings St., Vc ith^ Engineering 
'EPS. David Ave., Holyoke; Engineering 

STEWA. -Award L», 72 Hatherly Road, Scltoate; Engineering 

, Roger X»,- B5 Ibrd St., Brockton; Liberal Arts 
ORBAITIS, Victor 11., 1009 High St., Bridgewater; Phyaical Education 



BLUMIT, Diaija B., 31 North St., Randolph; Liberal Arts 
COOK, Joan S», North Plain Rd., Hoiisatonic; Liberal Arts 

.DS, Elizabeth B., 1 Reland St., Middlebcro; Liberal Arts 
FXSLER, Frances L., 105 Park St., N. Attloboro; Liberal Arte 

.PXKSKI, Paul! , 49 Lowell St., W. Springfield; Liberal Arts 
IS, Wanda L., 68 Exchange St., Walthamj* Liberal Arts 
MASON, Theresa L., 7 Plunkett Lane, Adams, Liberal Art's 
McFHAIL, Ann M« d 23 Foil en St., Boston; Chemistry 

, Eleanor R. » 30 Wh.it£ord St.., Roslindale; Science 
IAMB, Lura A*, 20 James St. s Taunton; Liberal Arts 



University of Jfiassachusetts 

toe 2k 9 1952 

ReeosiBidiadations of the University Committee 

on Course of Study 

The following changes in e©urse% new courses* and curri- 
cula have been approved by the Course of Study Committee of the 
University and are set forth for your consideration and approval 3 



$ 



I« A change in the hours of Civil Engineering 51 
Strength of Materials, now given in four-class 
hours per week, credit h* Recommend it be given 
In three-class hours and one three-hour labora- 
tory pev week 9 credit k s 

2c A change in the hours of Education 72 , Vocational 
Education In Agriculture 9 and Education 75, 
Technique of Teaching Vocational Agriculture, from 
three-class hours, credit 3? P®3* week for each 
course to two- class hours and one two-hour labora- 
tory, credit 3 , for each course* 






Increased interest in secondary school teaching 
on the part of our students as well as the intro- 
duction of courses in Elementary Education to the 
curriculum have prompted some careful study in 
those Departments other than Education which offer 
training of value to grade and high school 
teachers® We have, therefore, approved new courses 
In Recreational Education, a new curriculum in 
Speech leading to a major, and have revised the 
entire program of the Department of Physical 
Education for Men,, 

a First, we recommend dropping from the 
curriculum the following* courses formerly 




Field Studies 1 Biological Field Studies 
61 and 62 9 Public Relations in Mature Be~ 
creationj Biological Field Studies 71 and 
72, Advanced Biological Field Studies f 
and Biological Field Studies 73 and ?h 9 
Special Problems in Natural Science We 
also reeomend dropping Physical Education 
$7 % Camp Counselor" Training Course, and 
Physical Education 73 , Recreation « Ad- 
ministration and Organization, after the 
school year 1952-53* 



b«, The work formerly given in s of the 
Biological Field Study ses will now 
be given by the Department of Zoology© 
The pre-reqv. ;es for these courses 
will indicate they will substantially 
strengthen the standards of our major in 
Recreation o We recommend their adoption? 

Zoology $* (II) NATURAL HIST (BY - PHYSICAL, 

Designed to orient students to the features 

of the sky 9 eliiaate, and terrain which 
are of prime importance to the teaching 
naturalist « Collection , recording , pre- 
servation* and the use of natural objects 
will be sires seel o Biological data will 
also be obtained as the season dictates* 

Pre~Requisitess Geology 1« Botany 1, Zoology 1* 

Wildlife Management 2? 

1 class horn* 9 1 four-hour laboratory, credit 3 

Zoology 55 (I) NATtfoAL HISTORY - BIOHC* 

.An extentien of Zoology jfc with emphasis 
on the fauna and flora* This course is 

primarily concerned with. the development § 
local distribution* responses , and later*, 
relationships of these organisi§s Their 
poi .on with respect to the physical e) 
virenzeent will be discussed in sons detail* 

Prerequisites! Botany 26 and Zoology $k 

1 class hour,. 1 four-hour laboratory, credit 3o 

Zoology 55 (II) HASURAIi HISTORY - FIELD STUi 

A program of extensive field work growing 

out of preparation in Ecology ;?* and Zoology 5§< 

tphaels upon the seasonal differences in 
abundance and stage of development of our 
fauna and flora© 

Pre-Requlsitest Zoology 55 ®®& permission of 

the Instructor 
1 class hour, 1 two-hour laboratory, credit 2« 

o» Upon I)To ¥inal s s retlrezoent, Br» CSrls&shaw was 
brought to our staff and Recreation was mad® 




planning t>ne courses is oompiei;ea, 

of the content in Dr final's courses is in- 
corporated in new ones, but other types of work 
have been Introduced to establish a really 
broad selection in the Recreation major We 
recommend the adoption of the following in 
Recreations 



C£» ***8ffl 



Recreation 51 CD miHGIFOSS OF RECREATION. 

This course? considers recreation as an im- 
portant social force in education and 
community living. Emphasis is given to 
the study &n.& discussion of established 
principles and their applicability to 
functional recreation programs • 
3 class hours 9 credit 3e 

Recreation 52 (XX) GROUP LEADERSHIP AND CAMP COUNSELING. 

A study of principles and practices deal™ 
lng with leadership problems • group work 
methods 9 camp counseling, ana organiza- 
tions . Application is made to youth- serving 

agencies and organised camps through 
practical observations and demonstrations. 
Special attention is given to social and 

educational outcomes for adolescents , 

Prerequisites Recreation 51 
3 class hours $ credit 3, 

Recreation 53 (I) SOCIAL RECREATION. 

Provides leadership preparation in a wide 
range of social recreation for various age 
levels. Selecting and developing materials 
for \sse in actual situations is required. 
Opportunity is provided for practical ex« 
perience in planning and conducting party 
games and mixers, group s5.nging, social and 
square dancing* outings and picnics 9 and 
other mass activities for home, church , club, 
eampg playground, hospital and institutional 
use® 

Prerequisite* Recreation 51 
3 class hours, credit 3o 

Recreation 5H- (II) FIELD WORK EXPERIENCE. 

Supervised off -campus field work experience 
is required of students preparing for leader- 
ship and teaching responsibilities in re- 
creation and outdoor education. Assignments 
of one month are arranged for field experi- 
ence during the summer following the Junior 
year. Cooperating recreation centers, camps, 
schools, hopsitals, industries, and other 
youth, serving organisations provide students 
•with actual leadership preparation^ Students 
are guided in their study through the use of 
a workbook adapted for the purpose and per- 
sonal supervision* Placement arrangements 
should be made with the guidance of the ma^or 
adviser as early as possible in the Junior year*? 

Hon-- Credit Course* 



i*V .1 



Recreation 75 (I) FIELD WORK ANALYSIS. 

A seminar for recreation majors. Course 
is planned primarily to discuss and 
evaluate supervised student leadership 
experience in community recreation^ caxap» 
ing* and outdoor education Q Student reports, 
staff appraisals t and workbook problems 
contribute to the analysis of field exper- 
ience and student accomplishments c 

Pre-Req#isite* Recreation 5V 
3 class hours j credit 3* 

Recreation % (11) FOBLIC RELATIONS IN RECREATION, 
This course is intended to provide opportu- 
nity for a study of the purposes and methods 
In developing and maintaining interest and 
understanding in public recreation. The 
coarse explores recommended programs and 
procedures for establishing good public re- 
lations and securing recreation as an im- 
portant eoMosmity affair. Provision' Is ssada 
for practical application and evaluation of 
selected techniques and their effectiveness 
in creating favorable public opinion. 

Prerequisite s Recreation 51 

3 class hours j credit 3* 

Recreation 77 CD ORGANIZING AND CONDUCTING COMMUNITY" 

RECREATION* 
This course gives speelal . attention to pro- 
gram planning for rural and urban recreation 
areas $ neighborhood centers, adult educa- 
tion projects* 'and community activities* 
Organisation and management including schad« 
tiling* staff assignments 9 record keeping* 
reports > special events » promotion and oifeer 
departmental problems are considered, 

3 class hours 9 credit 3* 

Recreation ?8 (I) or (II) SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN RSSCRBAflON 

AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION, 
With approval of the major adviser* A quali- 
fied senior may elect to undertake independent 
study of a selected problem in the area of 
his primary interest or specialisation* Out- 
lines and reports mast satisfy acceptable 
standards . for written work* 

Pre-Reouisite* Recreation $*(■ 
3 class hours, credit 3« 







d© In terms at numbers of courses 

• Massachusetts has placed **7th among the 
V/ state universities which give courses 
in Speech and the !D?&!B&tic Arts« This 
program, like I&crcatlon, is related to 
the demand for well-* trained schoolteachers* 

and we have no^i come to a " point inhere 
wc can set up the copses and give the 
work© 




The following courses in Speo< 

Arts are recoaffiaarided for your 

the understanding that they will not be 

offered until $ in the nominal course of 
events j we can provide one additional 
tea -r "f or the ' Department of Speech* Taken 
together with prescribed cow see in 
Psychology 9 English,, Art* Philosophy* and 
Education* they enaol-e ue, not only to give 
training to those "Whose future professions 
and avocations will make experience in 
Dramatics useful and enjoyable, but also to 
%±-im« for the first tiae$ a isajor in Speech 
^hicn adequately prepares for graduate -work* 
We recoEme&d approval of the following 
courses and at the same time the elimina- 
tion of the present Speech 89 , Dramatic 
Production 5 from the Curriculum* 

Speech 51 (I) VOICE MB DICTION AND CEIL IKTERPRETATIOW, 
The com* so is divided into five weeks of 
training and drill in the correct production 
of speech, followed by ten weeks of practice 
in the fundamentals of vocal interpretation 
of literature « It is possible for a student 
to take the five weeks of voice and diction 
and receive one credit 

3 class hours* credit X or 3* 

Speech 61 CD FOHDAMBNttALS CF BROADCASTIHO. 

A general introduction of broadcasting, pr aetl< 
in preparing « rehearsing f and producing p. 
grains of various types© 

2 class hours 9 1 two-hour laboratory, Ci 

Speech 75 CD ACTING AND MAKB-TJP. 

The course is roughly divided into ten 
weeks of study of emotion and invagination 
in acting 9 reading lines, rehearsing, diction 
and bodily actions and five weeks of study 
and application or the principles of stage 
make-up « 

2 class hours, 1 two-hour laboratory, credit 3« 



•6. 



Speech 71 (I)SCBHS DESIGN AMD CONSTRUCTION, 

Theories and design in the modern theatre 
^ith assignments in developing stag© 
settings from sketches to working draw- 
ing! from scenery construction to paint in. 

class hours $ 1 tuo»hour laboratory, credit 3o 

Speech 76 (II) STAGE DEffiCEXOiT. 

Study and practice in the fundamentals of 
directing a play* For majors &n& nen-mjor 
R--. .:-d for non- ere taking only on 
course in Drac. 

2 class hours$ 1 ttfo~hour laboratory, credit 3* 

Speech ?8 (XI) STAGE LIG; 

Introduction to lighting a stage* Analysis 
of basic types of equipment and their appli- 
cation In. artistic productions* Simple 
firing and installations* 

2 class hours , 1 ttio«»honr laboratory, credit 3 Q 

Speech 9^ (XI) FERStTASIGH, 

Advanced study and practice in appeals to 
beliefs and actions through extemporaneous 
speech* 

Prerequisites Speech 9! 

3 class hours$ 0- .t 3» 

h 9 The Physical Education program has gtasfn over the 

years by the addition of single courr time 
to time* The new developments in Recreation 
courses, increasing demand for safety training - 
for teachers , and a need to re-examine* revise, 
and consolidate our courses in Physical Educa- 
tion for Men have led to a complete revision of 
the offerings of the physical Education Department, 

Content of courses lias been modified 9 numbers 
have been changed, soma courses eliminated* and 
the amount of creait in a sizable number of 
cetirses has been reduced from 3 to X» The new 
curriculum for the major is a definite advance 
and establishes requirements that #111 entitle 
our work in Physical Education to favorable com- 
parison tfil any program on campus* The 
CoMiittee submits for your approval, "With some 
enthusiasm, the entire netv program in Physical 










Y«» 



the exception of Physical Education fB ? Organized 
Camping Administration , Physical Education 59 j 
Scouting Elements and Principles $ and Physical- 
Education 7^ Recreation - Recreation Land Use* 
which reiaain unchanged* 












f t© 






sstion ^*o i 



>n cr t 



\<thl 



H13.n 

cont 









of 










Students a; icied to attain mir? . phys 
idards establ gnt tthich 5 

-ility to si 






.a major in L edueat5 iing to a degre* 

if Selene© I: L Edi: on is designs 

to train ent for a career as a teaehe; 

at ion, '.eludes adequate train 

othe elds of teaching and coaching of intersex. 

a ted t Physical Educat: 
ined general scientific and 
subje< jr are urged to elect advanc 
nd tb .anning on. tcaehe?«-coachlng sh 
tke add. articular subject n 

is a 






23* 



■leal' education ma. 
Freshman Year 



:t 

9 Comp< Ion 
ch 3 

ary 1 

8d ft -ity 

El wo 

General 
atrodw 
sropes 



rill 



logy 

■ry 2 
X oot not 

Sd 35* ActiTl? 
.ves* « one to 1. 

Science 



Cr«s 



English "2 j Compos! 
Speech, h 






i^matics 












Military 2 

Phys Ed* 6* Activity 

Phv 22 « First Aid 

two (one be a 
Chemistry- 2| General 
ZooX; \u< 

story i -an 

: 7ernv 



■ osioi 









English 26^ Haa&ne Letters 
Zoology 35 • Physiology 



ai] 



leetive,s* 
ted f 



TB* Ed. te f Aquatics 

Phys* Ed* 36$ Activity 



€r* 









*5 






Junior Tear 



1st 
EcL 83* Secondary Schools 
Phys* &!• 63 % Activity 

Phys. M, 53 j EXementoSeh, 
Phys* Sdo 51 9 Aaatony 
Phys 55 -j To and 
Elect! ves 



3 
3 






Education 52$ Methods 3 

Phys* Ed„ &+% Activity 1 

Phys* Ed s 5^ j Secondary Sch,3 

, E&e 52* Kinesiology 3 

Elective 8 6 



Ser 



Edo 85 . 3 Practice Teaching a? 

Elective 3 

Physo Sd. 83, Activity 1 

Phys. Ed* 77% Coaching 3 

Phys, Bd„ 75* Org. and Adm« .} 

Electives 5 



Ed* 8$^ Practice Teaching or 
Elective 3 

Ed« 88 f Son «, -Curriculum 3 
Phys* Ed & 8%j Activity 1 

iys* E&* 78 , Coaching 
Elective* 



.j 



X a 




tion with 
inserted 

when the ne r *i course is approved * In the meantime s majors tfill elect 

a standard sophomore elective* 

Physical Education for Men 
Activity Courses 

3u (I) h. (II) PHSTSICAL ACTIVITY COURSE,— The object of 

e course is to help ©very student* through regularity and con- 
tinuity of physical activity to realise not only his physical 
and mental capacities f but learn to use them as an intelligent* 
cooperative, and efficient citi.. The students are given motop 
ability tests* expected to learn ia and to meet minimum 
standards in the basic skills through participation In team sports 
Bind exercise o 



3 class hours 



Credit 1 
The Dc sent 



33* (I) &* (II) PHSSICAL ACTIVITY CO conv :tion 

of Physical Education 3 and k 



3 hours 



Credit X» 
Tfeta Department 



SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES III PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



The following courses are concerned with the methods and 
techniques of applied physical education and are opened primarily 
to students enrolled for degr ? teaching credentials in physical 
education. Classroom vresentr 5 fields court and floor aemonstr 
tions* non-major admisi by permission of the instructor Q 



j.ass 






* (Ij 








ham 



.rticipatlon hfootball, r icling 

/>.*Lng, anc 1/DQiXo 

a?s Cj 

U (I) HISTOKY AITD fSICAL Ei 

.3 tors 3lopioent of the various 

sal e a study of the aims Ideals 

t-day phys: >n e 

it 3c 

acma'QTES ^^eaohlng and org; j?ox 
a in socc 1$ track, and fie 



S (IX) SKILLS AHD T80HW J ^Instruction in techniques oJ 
teaching ©lemet atus ling and pyramids td.th emphasd 
on construction of gymnastic routines and formulation of demonstx 

3 eXasg srs Credit 3 

63a (I) 6K (XX) SKILLS AOT TECHHIQUESe —Teaching and organj 
ing groups for participation in golf , badminton ? boding, archery , 

3 class hours Credit 1 

83a (X) 8*** (ID SKILLS AHD TECHNIQUES o— Teaching and organj 
groups for participation in tennis,, wrestling ^ rhythasicgg volley* 
angling© 

ass hours Credit 3 

**&. (I) OFFICIATING* —Technique and practice in c 

football and soccer 



1 class hours 1 2«*hour laboratory period. Cred 






Vk (II) OFFICIATE ique and practice in officiating 
s ball and baseballs 

laboratory Credit 

eours s true human anatomy 

lour* F: 

\ APi ' AM 1 T.OGY,-- A course aiiaed tc 

anatomic pplicati usal to a thorough understanding 

ihanieal blems in appar: hletl ative 

3 ion 51 

Credii 






53. CD PBKBICAL UBLBMBOTAICr SCHOCtB.- .8 

course includes the objectives, orgaEi^ation, sign! ttoaneejand 
content of physical « ation in tne grade g^X^ .ueeour^ 
is correlated xrith the requirements of the State Department 01 
Education « 
2 class hours | 1 2-hour laboratory period Credit 3* 

f&v fXX> PHKICttEOTOAMOn«SB<X)I©AOTSCnOOIS.--.Th» course 
include; the objectives, organisation, algntfleanee, and conten. 
of phyeioal education in the secondary schools* The course xs 
Correlated with the requirements of the State Department of 
:atlon« 

1 class hour | 2 2-hour laboratory periods Credit 3* 

55. CO ^STS AUD WMTmiWRB •—This course considers the ■ 
status of measurement in physical education, an historical sketch, 
typical contributions in anthropometrics, strength tests, abixicy 
id achievement tests, cardiac jpunctional tests 1 ? 0C J o ^ BI ? s 2S ar 

$V 

■■st administration, 

2 class hours | 1 2- ■aboratory period Credit 3. 

71 o (I) 72. (ID SPECIAL PROBLEMS CCJDRSB,— -Presdentation and 

discussion of research work in physical education, health and 

safety education , or athletics* 

3 class hours Credit 3« 

7% (I) (RGAEIZAEION A1ID ADMINISTRATION 0? PEES ON, 

Problems and procedures in physical education, organization of ■ 
program*, class schedules, classification of students, equipnen 



3 class hours Credit 3* 

77 (1) COACHING*~~This course outlines the coaching of 
football and soccex 

2 class hour;?? 1 2-hour laboratory period Cwtlix 

?8 (II) COACHIXTO.— Continuation of Course 77* This course 

outlines the coaching of basketball, baseball, and tract ana field. 

2 class hour s f 1 2-hour laboratory period Credit 3« 

79. CD ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION— A program of develop- 
mental activities, games, sports, and rhythms suited to the 
interests, capacities and limitations of students with disabili- 
ties who may not safely engage in unrestricted participation in 

the vigorous activities of 'the general physical education program, 

Credit , 

3 class hours 



sical Education 22 « (II) FIRST AID iwm 
rse includes tx ng in th iard in- 

st First A:l . s c ccessful c 

itioi "ross First Aid Ins*'ructca 

hours Credit 3 

. Physical Education h>2« (11) WATER SAFET5T lUsmttCTOR C SE # - 
This course includes training in senior lif ©saving and the 
iiij -.^t op Water Safety Course* Successful cosaple ti on res at s ii 
Ion as Azoerlcan National Red Cross Water Saf e • 
>r 9 Some -wos n the conduct of competil 

aaing§ diving $ canoe .-.ting, zmti recreational 

■■grams i 



- 

IB 



1 class hour | 2 2**hour laboratory periods Credit 3 

Physical Education $% ?®T$ EDUCATION.^ -«- in- 

cludes activities and procedures ? li^school and oi oole 
designed to develop habits and attitudes that nil! lead to safe 
behavior through experiences in desir safety practice:. 2?he 
course is designed pr t seniors isajoring'ln physical edt 
tion and for elementary and secondary school teacher The courj 
is Intended as an el€ seniors majoring in Physical Educ* 
tlon« 



2 class hours Credit 2 

Physical Education 84 (1 .*TVER EMJCATI01 Ms course 
includes driver education ana ■■-.-..gaining at the instructor 
level,, and is designed to orient the student to live safely throi 
skillful and efficient behavior on streets and highways* The 
©ours© leads to certification as Massachusetts Registry ictor 
Behicles instructor in driver education and driver tr&inin It 
is designed primarily as an elective for seniors Soring in 
Physical Education,, 

2 class hours Credit 2 

Physical Education 8; I SIS TIC liynRIES-H^¥EI^10H AM) 
C£H*--9Phe- use of proper personal and field equipssent* support 
methods a conditioning e the medical examination^ therap* 
aids $ and the clinical use . other apy equipmsus 

2 class hours & 



a 



i 



5© For some years , we have had in the curriculum 
tirfo courses In Bacteriology knovm as Bacterio- 
logy 31, Introductory Bacteriology ~ Lectures 
and Demonstrations, and Bacteriology 3XA, 

Introductory Bacteriology - Laboratory* Each 
of these ^as a ttfo-credit course® For seme 
years it has not been feasible to permit a 
student to elect either Bacteriology 31 or 
31A independently, and with the approval of 
the Head of the Department bti& the School of 
Science the Committee recommends that 
Bacteriology 31A be eliminated fr om the 
curriculum and that the contents of both 
courses now be given as Bacteriology 31, 2 
class hours, 2 two-hour laboratory periods, 
credit h* 



The End 



I 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Amherst, Mass. 



August 1, 1952 

Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts 

The following letter dated July 22, 1952 from President 
Van Meter to the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachu- 
setts, and the resultant mail ballot are hereby made part of the 



official records of the Board. 



July 22, 1952 



To: All Trustees 



Dr. Henry J. Franklin will retire as Director of the 
Cranberry Experiment Station at wareham on August 31. This letter 
is to secure approval for the appointment of Dr. Chester E. Cross 
as Dr. Franklin' s successor. 

Dr. Cross graduated from the University in 1935* He re- 
ceived a Ph.D. at Harvard in Botany. He has been on the staff of 
the Cranberry Station since 1941 and he is 39 years old. 

The appointment of Dr. Cross is recommended by Dean of 
Agriculture, Dale H. Sieling, and this recommendation is supported 
by the cranberry growers, to whom Dr. Cross is well known. 



approved, 



I recommend that the appointment of Dr. Cross be 



Very truly yours, 



/s/ R. A. Van M e ter 
President 



1677 



Cross, Chester E, 



Director of 
Cranberry 
Experiment 
Station 



1678 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MAIL BALLOT 



I vote to 
not to 



X approve the appointment of Dr. Chester 



E. Cross as Dr. Franklin 1 s successor. 



Signed: 



Joseph V. Bartlett 
A. C. Brett 
Henry T. Broderick 
Harry Dunlap Brown 
Leonard Carmichael 
Dennis M. Crowley 
William M. Cashin 



J. M. Deely 

John J. Desmond, Jr. 

John ¥. Haigis 

Ernest Hoftyzer 

F. Roland McDermott 

W. A. Or ton 

Philip F. Miitmore 




- 



> 



~t 



Secretary 



Chairman 



679 



fRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
February 12, 1953, 2:00 P.M., Hotel Statler, Boston 



Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Broderick, 
Brown, Cashin, Crowley, Desmond, Donohue, 
McDermott, McNamara, Whitmore, President 
Van Meter, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To waive the reading of the call and the 
minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett appointed the following Nominating 
Committee to recommend officers and committee members for the coming 
year: Trustee "Whitmore, Chairman, Trustees Brett and Crowley. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Agriculture and 

Horticulture, it was 

VOTED : To authorize discontinuance of the program 

of inoculation of poultry against infectious 
bronchitis through field workers sent out by 
the University and in its stead the Univer- 
sity be authorized to distribute vials of 
virus at $5.00 per vial so that poultrymen 
may inoculate their own flocks. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Agriculture and 

Horticulture, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the University to discontinue 

the charge of five cents now made for distri- 
bution of technical bulletins outside the 
Commonwealth. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Agriculture and 

Horticulture, it was 



Nominating 
Committee 



Poultry 
Diseases 



Technical 
Bulletins 



1680 



TRUSTEE 



Agricultural 
Teachers 



Byers, Charles 
F. 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Colby, Byron E. 



Larson, Mrs. N. 
May 



Feldman, Robert 
S. 



Gamble, Philip 
L. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve the idea of employment of per- 
sons whose duties shall consist of combi- 
nations of teaching, research, extension 
or control law activity and to authorize 
the University to take the proper steps 
to make legal provision for this kind of 
employment and for the proper adjustment 
of the compensation of agricultural and 
administrative employees of the University. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To withdraw the appointment of C. F. 
Byers as Dean of the College of Arts 
and Science. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED: To approve the following requests for 

sabbatical leaves on the condition that 
funds are available and that each indi- 
vidual will submit a written statement 
to the President agreeing to return to 
the University for a period of at least 
one full year after the expiration of the 
sabbatical leave. 

1. Byron E. Colby, Extension Professor of Animal 
Husbandry, for 3 months in the summer of 1953 
and 3 months in the summer of 1954- with full 
pay to work on a master's degree in animal 
breeding and nutrition. 

2. Mrs. N. May Larson, Extension Professor of 
Child Development, for the period September 1 
through November 30, 1953 with full pay for 
study in accordance with a program to be 
approved by the President. 

3. Robert S. Feldman, Assistant Professor of 
Psychology, for the first semester of the 
college year 1953-54- at full pay for study 
at Harvard University. 

4-. Philip L. Gamble, Professor of Economics, 

for one semester of the college year 1953-54 
at full pay for research and study. 



RUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

5. Oreana A, Merriam, Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics, for the second semester of the 
college year 1953-54- at full pay for research 
and study at Tulane University. 

6. Arthur B. Musgrave, Professor of Journalism, 
for one year beginning September 1, 1953 at 
half pay for study and writing probably at the 
University of Wisconsin. 

7. Albert B. Nelson, Assistant Professor of Geology, 
for the first semester of the college year 1953- 
54- at full pay to complete his doctoral thesis. 

8. Victor A. Rice, Head of the Department of Animal 
Husbandry, for the first semester of the college 
year 1953-54- at full pay for study at North 
Carolina State College. 

9. N. James Schoonmaker, Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics, for the second semester of the 
college year 1953-54- at full pay to complete 
requirements for the degree Doctor of Philosophy 
at the University of Pittsburgh. 

10. Frederick S. Troy, Professor of English, for one 
year beginning September 1, 1953 at half pay for 
research and writing. 

11. Olga M. Olesiuk, Assistant Research Professor of 
Veterinary Science for one year at half pay be- 
ginning September 1, 1953 for research work in 
the field of respiratory diseases of poultry. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the following change in the terms 
of employment for resident teachers. Delete 
paragraph 4- of "the terms as stated on the employ- 
ment form which reads "The annual period of ser- 
vice of resident teachers is 10 months." Insert 
in place of this sentence the following sentence; 
"The annual period of service of resident 
teachers is for the academic year." 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 



681 



Merriam, 
Oreana A. 



Musgrave, 
Arthur B. 



Nelson, Albert 
B. 



Rice, Victor A. 



Schoonmaker, 
N. James 



Troy, 
Frederick S, 



Olesiuk, 

Olga M. 



Terms of 
Employment 



*L>* 



TRUSTEE 



Psychology- 



New Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To approve the following change in the terms 
of employment for members of the professional 
staff of the University other than the resi- 
dent teachers. Delete paragraph j+ of the 
terms as stated on the employment form which 
reads "The annual period of service of members 
of the professional staff other than resident 
teachers is 11 months." Insert in place of 
this sentence the following sentence: "The 
annual period of service of members of the pro- 
fessional staff other than resident teachers is 
12 months, with vacation of one month allowed 
in each year of service." 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the University to offer a pro- 
gram of study in Psychology leading to the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the following new courses of study: 

Psychology 204. Learning II — A consideration of the 
Implications of the basic laws of learning for explain- 
ing complex behavior. Given in alternate years be- 
ginning 1953-54-- Prerequisite, Psychology 203* Credit, 3. 

Psychology 207* Systematic Psychology — An analysis of 
the general structure of psychological theory, and an 
historical and comparative consideration of the back- 
grounds, viewpoints on scientific methodology, research 
interests and techniques, and the component variables, 
hypotheses, and laws of structural, Gestalt, functional, 
and behavioristic movements. Given in alternate years 
beginning 1954-55. Credit, 3. 

Psychology 210, Emotion and Motivation — A study of 

the nature, determinants, and interrelationships of 

emotion and motivation, and of the techniques involved 

in investigating these phenomena. Given in alternate 

years, beginning 1954-55- Credit, 3- 

Psychology 214. Test Construction II — The use of corre- 
lational and analysis of variance techniques in test con- 
struction. The class will statistically analyze a test 
which they have constructed. Prerequisite, Psychology 
213. Credit, 3. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Psychology 252. Projective Methods II — Basic inter- 
pretive procedures of projective devices with emphasis 
upon the Rorschach and Thematic Apperception Test. 
Prerequisite, Psychology 251. Credit, 3« 

Psychology 253. Advanced Clinical Psychology I — 
Diagnosis. Application of the principles and techniques 
of psychological diagnosis to the individual case. Given 
in alternate years, beginning 1954--55. Prerequisites, 
Psychology 235, 252. Credit, 3. 

Psychology 271. Advanced Industrial Psychology I — 
Human relations in industry. Applications of general 
and social psychological findings to industry and busi- 
ness, with a concentration on the interdependence of 
morale, leadership and motivation. Given in alternate 
years, beginning 1953-54-* Prerequisite, Psychology 186, 
or the consent of the instructor. Credit, 3* 

Psychology 283. 28A. Practicum — Practice in the appli- 
cation of psychological techniques to the following 
areas of psychology; child, clinical, guidance and 
counseling, industrial, and social. Either semester 
may be elected independently • Credit, 

3-12. 

Psychology 295. 296 . Research Methodology . — A study 
and evaluation of research methods and of problems in 
the major fields of psychology. Conducted in conjunc- 
tion with the weekly Departmental Seminar. Two semesters 
are required of students studying toward the doctorate. 

Credit, 2. 
each semester. 

Psychology A00. Doctor's Thesis . — Research, and the 
preparation of an acceptable thesis. Credit, 30. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty 

and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the University to offer a pro- 
gram of study in Sociology leading to the de- 
gree Master of Arts. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the following new courses of 
study: 



683 



Sociology 



1684 



TRUSTEE 



New Courses 



Music 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Sociology 21A II . Criminology — A consideration of 

criminological theories, past and present. Special 

emphasis on present research trends as they relate 

to theoretical formulations. Offered in alternate 

years, beginning 1952-53 • Prerequisite Sociology 78, 

or equivalent. Credit, 3 



Sociology 217 I. Juvenile Delinquency — Causes; 
problems of adjustment; recidivism; treatment. 
Offered in alternate years, beginning 1953-54* 
Prerequisite Sociology 78, or equivalent. 



Credit, 3 



Sociology 268 II. Industrial Sociology — A study of 
the role, status, and function of the worker in the 
industrial community. A consideration of the impact 
of technological change on the community. Prerequisite 
Economics 79- Credit, 3 



Sociology 281 I. History of Sociological Theory — A 
survey of the literature from classical times to 
Herbert Spencer. Prerequisite Sociology 82, or 
equivalent. 



Credit, 3 



Sociology 282 II, C ontemporary Sociological Theory — 
A survey of the literature from Herbert Spencer to the 
present. Prerequisite Sociology 82, or equivalent. 

Credit, 

Sociolog y 291 I. Social Change — Emphasis is placed 
upon planned innovations and reforms in political, re- 
ligious, and economic areas and upon the possibilities 
and problems of social planning. Consideration is also 
given to social changes resulting indirectly from inven- 
tion and group contact. Admission by consent of the in- 
structor. Credit, 



Sociology 300. Thesis 



Credit, 9 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the University to offer an under- 
graduate major in Music. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following curriculum in Music: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Music 25 and 26, Fundamentals of Music — A study of 
the structure of music for appreciative, executive, 
and creative purposes, to meet the practical needs 
of the listener, performer, or creator. Sight, Sing- 
ing, Ear Training, and Keyboard Practice will be used 
to give context to the acquired music theory. All 
music majors will be required to study piano while 
following this course. 1 Class hour, 2 Two hour 
laboratories (each semester) Credit, 3« 

each semester 

Music 75 and 76, Music Theory — The development of 
skill in the use of the fundamentals of music. Ele- 
mentary and advanced harmony are studied and practiced. 
Techniques of Elementary Counterpoint are presented to 
show the relationship to vocal and instrumental music. 
2 Class hours, 1 Two hour laboratory (each semester) 

Credit, 3* 
each semester 

Music 77 and 78. Form and Analysis — An approach to the 
study of music and through observation of its form, an 
analysis of its rhythms, melodies, and harmonies as used 
in the instrumental and vocal compositions of the various 
periods of music history. The theory of conducting is 
discussed, studied, evaluated, and its techniques 
practiced. 1 Class hour, 2 Two hour laboratories (each 
semester) Credit, 3. 

each semester 

Music 79. Score Reading and Analysis — Through listening 
and reading assignments, the characteristics of voices 
and instruments are studied and the results are applied 
to arranging for vocal and instrumental groups of various 
types, sizes, and combinations. 3 Class hours. Credit, 3. 

Music 80 , Score Reading and Composition — A continuation 
of Music 79* In this course the student is expected to 
study the methods and materials of original composition. 
Procedures for processing, printing, publishing, and 
marketing are evaluated. Laws and regulations governing 
performance, publication of composition, and use of per- 
sonnel are discussed. 3 Class hours. Credit, 3» 

Music 81. Musi c and History — A survey of the periods 
in music history attempting to transport the student in- 
to the spirit of each of the great periods of music — 
Renaissance, Baroque, Classic, Romantic, and Modern — 
so that he will feel their quality, understand their en- 
thusiasms, their technical resources and limitations, and 
their habits of thoughts and style. 3 Class hours. 

Credit, 3. 



New Coirs es 



1686 



TRUSTEE 



Botany- 



New Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Music 82, Music and Research Methods — An orientation 
course in the manner of a seminar and is recommended 
to all students interested in bibliography, references, 
source materials, rental libraries, etc. who expect to 
work in the field of music or related fields. In addi- 
tion to compilation, the student will investigate a 
special area of study and report the findings in 
written form. 3 Class hours. Credit, 3« 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following new undergraduate 
courses of study and the discontinuance of 
Botany 53. 

Botany 30 f Plant Anatomy — A study of the origin and 
structure of vegetative and reproductive organs of 
seed plants. Prerequisites Botany 1, Botany 25 
recommended. 2 Class hours; 1 two-hour laboratory. 

Credit, 3« 

Indu strial Administration 80 (II) — Administrative 
Procedures . Theory and practice of administrative 
organization, planning and direction as applied in 
business situations, formation and execution of busi- 
ness policies, coordinated and effective operation 
through group action. 3 Class hours. Credit, 3. 

Physical Education 63 (I) 6A (II) — Teaching Sports 
for Secondary School . Designed to give the fundamen- 
tals of teaching and officiating of team sports for 
women appropriate for the secondary school level. 
Course content includes development and knowledge of 
techniques, knowledge of rules, teaching progressions, 
class procedures, and instruction in officiating re- 
lated to the following activities: hockey, soccer, 
speedball, volleyball, basketball, and Softball. 1 
Class hour; 3 laboratory hours. Credit, 2. 

Physical Education 6ft (I) — Rhythms and Dancing for 
the Ele me ntary School . The course will include the de- 
velopment of rhythmic sense through basic motor skills; 
dramatizations; the construction of simple dance forms; 
folk dances and singing games. There will be practice 
in planning the rhythm and dance program in the elemen- 
tary school from nursery school through sixth grade. 
1 Class hour; 3 laboratory hours. Credit, 2. 



rRUSTEE 



1687 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Physical Education 66 (II) — Play Activities and 

Games for Elementary Schools , A study of the place 

of physical education in the schools with emphasis on 

procedures, organization, and teaching techniques. 

There will be more opportunity to learn games and 

other play activities for children from 5 to 14 years. 

1 Class hour; 3 laboratory hours. Credit, 2. 

Economics 5A (II) — Money, Income and Moneta ry Policy. 
A study of the relationship between money, income, and 
monetary policy. It includes examination of the rela- 
tionships between individuals, banks, money markets, 
and central banks. Prerequisite Economics 53 or 
Finance 53 • 3 Class hours. Credit, 3. 

Zoology 91 (I) 92 (II) — Special Problems in Zoology . 

Qualified graduate students and seniors who have met 

departmental requirements for specialization in the 

field of Zoology may arrange for work on a special 

problem in Zoology. Credit, 1-3. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the University to offer a program 
of study in Business Administration leading to 
the degree Master of Business Administration. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the following new courses of study: 

Business Administration 201. Accounting Theory in 
Management — The theory of accounts applied to manage- 
ment problems; the established methods of accounting in 
operating situations; the use of quantitative data as 
bases for policy decisions. Credit, 3, 

Business Administration 211. The Business Enterprise — 
The legal-economic-political environment in which busi- 
ness enterprise operates; the risks of enterprise and 
profits; market demand analysis; cost-price combinations 
and production policies; the effects of business fluc- 
tuations on the individual enterprise; the enterprise 
system and public policy as expressed in legislation. 

Credit, 3< 

Business Administration 222 , Marketing Management — A 
study of the function of marketing from the point of 
view of the business executive. The broad aspects of 
product planning and choice of channels of distribution 
as well as distribution problems are analyzed. The in- 
terrelations between research planning, execution and 
control of marketing activity is carefully considered. 

Credit, 3. 



Business 
Administration 



New Courses 



1688 



TRUSTEE 



Machmer, 
William L. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Business Administration 231* Financial Management — 
Attention is first centered on financing current 
operations: financial analysis and planning; credit 
management; and the sources and management of working 
capital. Then, long-term financial policies are 
stressed: the forms and uses of corporate securities; 
the capital structure; surplus and dividend policies; 
financing new enterprises; the recapitalization and 
reorganization of going concerns. Credit, 3» 

Business Administration 242, Production and Personnel 
Management — This course deals with the situations 
which confront executives in charge of manufacturing 
operations and the direction of people at work. It 
is designed to develop skill in analyzing production 
processes in order to determine specific adaptations 
of production and personnel techniques that best satis- 
fy the particular requirements of differing processes. 

Credit, 3. 

Business Administration 252, Problems in Business Ad- 
ministration — Assuming a knowledge of departmental 
organization in business, this course covers policy 
formation at the top level of management. Considera- 
tion is given to the principles and techniques by which 
executives develop and integrate the work of their 
various departments. Students apply the theories to 
actual cases. Credit, 3. 

Business Administration 271. Seminar in Business Ad- 
ministration I — A critical and intensive study of 
selected problems in Accounting, Finance, Industrial 
Administration, or Marketing and the application of 
research methods to these problems. Credit, 3. 

Business Administration 272. Seminar in Business Ad- 
ministration II — A continuation of the Seminar in 
Business Administration in the field of the student's 
special interest. Credit, 3« 

Business Administration 300. Thesis , Master's degree. 

Credit, 3 
or 6. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To name William L. Machmer, Dean of the 

University, Emeritus, effective on the date 
of his retirement, January 31 > 1953. 



FRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, the Trustees unanimously adopted the following 

resolution as part of the records of the Board and instructed the 

Secretary to sutanit copy of the resolution to Dean Machmer. 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts express their deepest appreciation of 
the faithful and effective leadership of William L. 
Machmer during his long period of service to the Uni- 
versity, both as teacher and Dean, 

He came to the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
in 1911 as instructor in mathematics. Students soon 
came to know him as an exceptionally fine teacher. 
His contagious enthusiasm for his favorite subject, 
coupled with an unusual knack for clear presentation 
of difficult problems won for him a place of high es- 
teem among his students and fellows in the teaching 
profession. He was more than teacher, however. He 
was a friend, taking sympathetic interest in all the 
problems of young people. He possessed patience, a 
wholesome optimism and sound judgment in dealing with 
the many trying situations that confront college stu- 
dents. He gave unselfishly of his time not only to 
help them in their mathematical problems but also with 
those more important personal ones that so often tor- 
ment them. 

His success in counseling early brought him into 
the administrative work of the University. As Dean 
from 1926 to 1953 he was responsible for the resident 
instruction program of the University as well as the 
guidance of its student body. His unflinching in- 
sistence upon high scholastic standards resulted in the 
fine academic reputation the University has enjoyed 
over his long period of leadership. 

Both positions, teacher and Dean, demanded in- 
creasing amounts of his time, thought and energy. To 
both he has ever been loyal. 

The Board of Trustees in recognizing Dean Machmer' s 
42 years of faithful service to the University, extend 
to him, upon his retirement, their gratitude and best 
wishes. 



Resolution on 
Dean Machmer 



1690 



TRUSTEE 



Cahill, 
Fred B. 



Appointments, 

Promotions, 

Retirements 



Ratification 
of Actions 



Honorary- 
Degrees 



Resolution on 
Dr. Hubbard 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Fred B. Cahill, Jr. as Professor 
of Government beginning September 1, 1953 
at annual salary of $6180. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study, it vas unanimously 

VOTED ; To approve the attached report on appointments, 
promotions and retirements. 

The Trustees 

VOTED ; To approve and ratify actions of all 

committees of the Board since the date 
of the last annual meeting. 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Honorary Degrees and of President Van Meter, it was 

VOTED ; To award the following honorary degrees at 
the 1953 Commencement with the understand- 
ing that the recipients must be present in 
person to receive the degree; otherwise the 
degree is not awarded: 

Henry J. Franklin - Doctor of Science 

Harold F. Jones - Doctor of Agriculture 

Herbert J. Stack - Doctor of Education 

Conrad L. Wirth - Doctor of Landscape Architecture 

David Morton - Doctor of Literature 

It was unanimously 

VOTED: To adopt the following resolution and to 
instruct the Secretary to send copy to 
Dr. Hubbard. 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts express their deep appreciation of the long 
and loyal service rendered by Dr. Clifford C. Hubbard as 
a Trustee of the University from 1939 to 1953. 

His constant interest in high educational standards 
was evident in the care which he devoted to matters in- 
volving faculty and curriculum. His quiet, friendly per- 
sonality, his wealth of experience as an educator and his 
devotion to the welfare of the University earned for him 
the admiration and esteem of his fellow trustees. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the occasion of his retirement from the Board, 
the Trustees extend to Dr. Hubbard their sincere best 
wishes and their gratitude for his faithful service. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the following resolution and to instruct 
the Secretary to send copy to Mr. Deely. 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts express their sincere appreciation of 
outstanding service rendered by John M. Deely during his 
seven years as a trustee of the University. 

Mr. Deely brought to the Board an enthusiasm for a 
greater University, a sympathy for the needs of its 
faculty, and an ardent interest in the welfare of the 
student body. The Trustees feel that the Committee on 
Student Affairs which he established will play an in- 
creasingly important role in the future development of 
the University. 

On the occasion of his retirement from the Board, 
the Trustees extend to Mr. Deely their thanks for his 
contributions and their sincere best wishes. 

President Van Meter presented his annual report and it 
was unanimously 

VOTED : To accept the report as presented. 

Jean Paul Mather, newly appointed Provost of the Univer- 
sity, addressed the Trustees briefly concerning the new work which 
he is beginning at the University. 

Trustee Crowley presented a proposal for changing the 

By-Laws of the Board to require four stated meetings a year rather 

than two as at present. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To delete Article 2, paragraph 1 of the By- 
Laws of the Board of Trustees and to substitute 
in its place Article 2, paragraph 1 as follows: 
"There shall be three stated meetings of the 
Trustees in each year; the first to be known 
as the annual meeting at which officers shall 
be chosen and the annual report made, shall be 
held at the State House in Boston in February 



691 



Resolution on 
Mr. Deely 



President's 
Annual Report 



By-Laws 



1692 



TRUSTEE 



Treasurers 
Report 



Nominating 
Committee 



Committees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

at the call of the Chairman, or at such place 
as the Trustees at any previous meeting may 
determine. The second meeting shall be held 
in Amherst during the commencement period. 
The third meeting shall be held in Amherst or 
Boston in the fall. The day and hour of each 
of these meetings shall be fixed by the Chair- 
man of the Board, and the place of holding any 
of the meetings other than the meeting in 
Amherst during the commencement period may be 
changed by the Chairman giving notice of the 
change to all members of the Board at least 
7 days before the date set by him for the 
meeting." 

It was 

VOTED ; To accept the annual financial report of the 
Treasurer for the year ending June 30, 1952. 

Trustee Whitmore reported for the Nominating Committee 

and it was unanimously 

VOTED: To instruct the Secretary to cast one ballot 
for the following slate of officers and 
committee members for the ensuing year: 

President, Christian A. Herter 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bartlett 
Secretary, James W. Burke 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Leonard Carmichael, Chairman Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 
John J. Desmond Rev. Florence J. Donohue 

Clifford C. Hubbard 



Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 
Alden C. Brett, Chairman 
Harry D. Brown 
Henry T. Broderick 



Dennis M. Crowley 
Ernest Hoftyzer 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds 

■ ■Ml II I ■ ■ » I I I ■ —— — —I— !■! M— — MM— **m ■"■! ■ — I 

Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John M. Deely 

Committee on Finance 

John ¥. Haigis, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
William M. Cashin 



John V. Haigis 

F. Roland McDermott 



F. Roland JMcDermott 
Philip F. "Whitmore 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Committee on Recognized Student Activities 
John M. Deely, Chairman 
Harry D. Brown 
Dennis M. Crowley 

Committee on Legislation 

Viliiam M. Cashin, Chairman 
John M. Deely 
John W. Haigis 

Executive Committee 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Leonard Carmichael 



<L/0 



Ernest Hoftyzer 
Clifford C. Hubbard 
Rev. Florence J. Donohue 



Mrs. Elizabeth L. McNamara 
Harry D. Brown 



Viliiam M. Cashin 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Treasurer Johnson reported briefly on the status of the 
1954. budget of the University. He said that the Governor's 
recommendations reduce the askings of the Board of Trustees by 
more than one million dollars in the maintenance budget. The 
capital outlay budget as recommended by the Public Building 
Commission provides for the renovation of Draper Hall, for certain 
utilities, and for an addition to the Chemistry building. 



On the recommendation of the President and the Treasurer, 



it was 



VOTED ; To authorize a $500 increase in the amount of 

the mortgage on Chi Omega Sorority be rescinded 
since the sorority has withdrawn their request 
for the increase in the mortgage. 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to place $3,560 
of the Athletic Reserve Fund with the Ware 
Savings Bank at interest of 3%» He is further 
authorized to place uninvested cash principal 
of the Endowment Funds with the Ware Savings 
Bank at interest. 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



Chi Omega 
Sorority 



Athletic 

Reserve 

Fund 



1694 



Research 
Contracts 



TRUSTEE 



Garage Rents 
at University 
Apartments 



Bowker 

Auditorium 
remodeling 



Fire Department 



Ladder 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sign research 
contracts for the University when the amount 
of the contract is $25*000 or less. 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



VOTED ; To approve a rental rate of $6.00 per month 

per garage unit be established for the rental 
of garages at the University Apartments. 



On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sign a contract 

for the preparation of plans and specifications 
and supervision of construction for the remodeling 
of Bowker Auditorium with the architectural and 
engineering firm of McClintock and Craig of 
Springfield, Massachusetts. 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



Military 
Property 
Custodian 



Public 

Health 
Building 



VOTED: To add an item for special appropriation of 
$11,500 to the 1954- budget as a payment for 
fire protection to the Town of Amherst to 
enable the town to purchase jointly with 
Amherst College and the University an aerial 
ladder truck. 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



VOTED : That the Business Manager be custodian of 
military property for the University. 



On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, 



it was 



VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sign contract 
in the name of and for the Board of Trustees 
with M. A. Dyer and Company for supervision 
of the construction of the Public Health 



Building. 



RUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Bartlett announced that Dean Machmer had been 
invited to attend the annual meeting and to address the Board. 
The Chairman said he had just received a letter from the Dean re- 
gretting his inability to attend and expressing his appreciation 
and thanks to the Board for their sympathetic interest, loyal 
support and genuine friendship. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5*4-5 P.M. 




Q gr^Afok *at& 



^Secretary 



Chairman 



695 



1696 



TRUSTEE 



Division of 
Nursing 



Mary Maher, 
Professor of 
Nursing 



Sabbatical 
Leave for 
V. A. Bice 



Sabbatical 
Leave for 

R. P. Holdsworth 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 15, 1953, 11:30 A.M., Butterfield House, Amherst 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT; 



Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 
Broderick, Brown, Crowley, Desmond, 
Donohue, McDermott, Perry, Taber, 
Vhitmore, Provost Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To waive the reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study, it was 

VOTED: To approve the establishment of a Division 
of Nursing in the University subject to 
approval of the proper accrediting authori- 
ties. 

It was 

VOTED: To appoint Miss Mary Maher to head the 

Division of Nursing in the grade of full 
professor at annual salary of $6,130 
effective September 1, 1953- 

It was 

VOTED: To change the date of sabbatical leave 
approved for Professor V. A. Rice from 
the first semester of the college year 
1953-54- to the second semester of the 
college year 1953-54* 

It was 

VOTED: To approve change in the date of sabbati- 
cal leave previously approved for Robert 
P. Holdsworth from February 1 through 
August 31, 1953 to February 1 through 
August 31, 1954. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED: To approve sabbatical leave for Miss 
Barbara Higgins, Home Demonstration 
Agent at Large, Extension Service, 
D of M, for six months with full pay 
beginning September 15, 1953 for the 
purpose of study toward a master 1 s de- 
gree. 

It was 

VOTED ; To approve the simultaneous award of 

the A, B. degree and an Engineering de- 
gree to Donald Cordette provided that 
Mr, Cordette satisfactorily completes 
all requirements for each degree during 
a period of study of not less than five 
academic years. 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To name the new dining hall - University 
Commons. 

It was 

VOTED ; To name the northern most of the two new 
dormitories for women, Leach House, in 
honor of Lottie A. Leach, former Trustee 
of the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To name the southern most of the two new 
dormitories for women, Crabtree House, in 
honor of Lotta Crabtree, benefactress of 
the University. 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the erection of placques bear- 
ing suitable inscriptions inside each Uni- 
versity building named for a person. These 
inscriptions would briefly state the full 
name of the person for whom the building was 
named with a line such as - President of the 
University, 1920-30, or Trustee, 1918-26, etc. 



1697 



Sabbatical 
Leave for 
Barbara 
Higgins 



Two Degrees 

Donald 
Cordette . 



University 
Commons 



Leach 
House 



Crabtree 
House 



Names in 
Buildings 

Placques 



1698 



TRUSTEE 



Women 1 s 
Physical 
Education 
Building 



Women* s 
Dormitory 



Removal of Sheds 
and Greenhouse, 
E. Exp. Station 



Men's 
Dormitories 



Munson Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VQTED; To authorize location of the Women's 
Physical Education Building north of 
Eastman Lane and approximately as far 
east from North Pleasant Street as the 
location of the new dining hall. The 
Women's Physical Education Building 
would then stand in the same relation 
to the women's dormitories on the north 
as the boarding hall occupies in rela- 
tion to the dormitories on the south. 

It was 

VQTED : To authorize location of the next women's 
dormitory along North Pleasant Street 
between Hamlin and Knowlton Houses, this 
dormitory to accommodate approximately 
200 students and to be connected with 
Knowlton and Hamlin with breezeways or 
open porches. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to remove 
all wooden sheds and the greenhouse 
attached to the East Experiment Station 
building. 

Upon the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To authorize construction of the next 
dormitory for men east of and in line 
with Chadbourne House, and that the 
architect be requested to plan this 
structure as a half dormitory to be 
completed later with another half east 
of Greenough House and adjoining the 
north side of the first half. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize use of the whole area to 
the east of Chadbourne and Greenough 
and to the north of Butterfield as an 
area for men's dormitories. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the alterations to Munson Hall 
as completed December 19, 1952. 



RUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED ; To approve a flat roof over the entrance 
to the new Durfee Range and curvilinear 
construction in the rest of the building. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Finance, it was 

VOTED ; To ratify and confirm mail ballot of 
April 28 authorizing the Treasurer, 
effective May 1, 1953* to exchange the 
following bonds, par for par: 

|1,000 Series G due July 1, 1953 
2,000 Series G due October 1, 1953 
for 3^% Treasury bonds due June 15, 1983. 

\t was unanimously 

VOTED : To accept the gift from Mrs. Elizabeth 
L. McNaonara as stated below and to in- 
struct the Secretary to express to 
Mrs. McNaTiara the appreciation of the 
Trustees for her generosity. The terms 
of the gift are as follows: 

"I give and bequeath to the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts, at Amherst, Massachusetts, the sum of One 
Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) to be used for the following 
purposes. 

"To constitute an endowment fund, such fund to be kept 
invested by the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
and the income to be used for the following purposes. 

"The income to be used annually for the purchase of a 
sterling silver goblet or trophy, to be known as the 
Elizabeth L. McNamara Trophy which shall be awarded annually 
to the cadet ranking number one in scholarship and military 
efficiency in the second year basic R0TC course of the 
University. 

"The remaining interest, after the purchase of the 
trophy and part of the principal, if necessary, shall be 
given annually to the University's Students' Loan Fund. 

"In future years if conditions so change at the Uni- 
versity that the above award is no longer feasible or 
possible, the Trustees may use the income from this fund 
in such manner as they see fit. 



1699 



Durfee 
Plant House 



Bonds 



Mrs. McNamara 
Gift 



1700 



TRUSTEE 



Class of 
1953 Gift 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"In a request for a loan from the Loan Fund, preference 
shall be given to the request from a member of the Newman 
Club or a student from Cambridge, Massachusetts." 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To accept the gift of the Class of 1953 
as stated below and to instruct the 
Secretary to thank the class for its 
generosity and thoughtfulness. The terms 
of the gift are as follows: 

"The class of 1953 of the University of Massachusetts 
gives and bequeaths to the trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts the sum of $1500, to be used for a University 
History Room. Any funds remaining after class expenses 
have been met shall be added to the $1500. 

"The fund shall be used for the purchase of exhibition 
show cases, for binding of University publications, for de- 
velopments determined by the Librarian, and for a plaque 
naming the room and donor. 

"This room shall be called University History Room 
given by the class of 1953 in honor of Dean William L. 
Machmer who served this University from 1911 - 1953> and 
shall be located in the present Memorabilia Room in the 
Good ell Library building. 

"The Librarian of the University shall carry out the 
plans for this room. Further developments shall be at his 
own discretion. The Librarian shall also have custody of 
the room. 

"The University History Room shall serve as a reposi- 
tory for University History material, official publications 
of the University, for exhibits of current and future acti- 
vities and plans of the University, and for such other 
material regarded as pertinent to such a room by the 
Librarian. " 

There was brief discussion of inscriptions for the 

dormitories named in honor of Lottie A. Leach and Lotta Crabtree 

and, it was 

VOTED ; To refer the inscriptions to the Trustee 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Secretary Burke said that the position of Alumni 

Secretary will soon be vacant. The present incumbent, George 

Emery, is on sick leave and has accepted a different position in 

the University effective upon his return. A committee of Alumni 

have been seeking candidates and also have been attempting to have 

the position regraded by the Legislature from the present grade 31 

with minimum annual salary of $3730 to grade 58 with minimum annual 

salary of $5880. This would place the position within $300 of a 

full professorship, and because of the absence of the President, 

it was felt desirable that the Trustees should be informed. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve the choice of the Alumni Screen- 
ing Committee and of the Board of Directors 
of the Associate Alumni of Robert Leavitt 
as Executive Secretary of the Alumni, 
effective July 1, 1953 with annual salary 
from University sources not to exceed $5880 
at time of initial appointment. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the following resolution and to 
instruct the Secretary to send copy to 
Dr. Carmichael. 

"Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts express their regrets at the resignation 
of Dr. Leonard Carmichael who leaves the Commonwealth to 
assume the position of Secretary of the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution. 

"Dr. Carmichael served as a University Trustee from 
1944 until 1953; he was chairman of the Committee on Faculty 
and Program of Study, a member of the Executive Committee 
of the Board, and a member of the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts at 
Fort Devens. 

"His executive ability, his capacity for hard work and 
wise decision, his long and able experience as an educator 
and educational administrator served the University well 
during the difficult post-war years in the establishment 
of a branch for veterans and in the expansion of the 



1701 



Alumni 
Secretary 



Robert 
Leavitt 



Resolution on 
Dr. Carmichael 



1702 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 

Degree 



Hobart H. 
Ludden, 
Custodian of 
Military 
Property 



Room Rent 
Thatcher Hall 



Room Rent 
Adams Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



University at Amherst to absorb the veterans whose education 
was begun at the Devens branch. His contributions were 
great. The University will ever owe him its deepest 
gratitude. 

"On the occasion of his resignation, the Trustees ex- 
tend to Dr. Carmichael their sincere best wishes." 

It was 

VOTED ; To confer the honorary degree, Doctor of 
Laws, upon Dr. Leonard Carmichael at the 
1953 Commencement. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the property regulations of 

the United States Army require the naming of the University 

Custodian of Military Property in the vote of authorization. On 

February 12, 1953> the Trustees authorized the Business Manager of 

the University to act as Custodian of Military Property but did 

not name the Manager by name. It was unanimously 

VOTED: To amend the vote of February 12, 1953 and 
to name Hobart H. Ludden, Business Manager 
of the University of Massachusetts as 
Custodian of Military Property. 

Upon the recommendation of Treasurer Johnson, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED ; To increase the room rent for Thatcher 

dormitory from $150 to $165 per academic 
year. 

Upon the recommendation of Treasurer Johnson, it was 

VOTED : To increase the room rent of Abigail Adams 
dormitory from $130 to $165 per academic 
year. 

This action will make the rates for all women's dormi- 
tories equivalent to the rates in the self-liquidating dormitories 
as recommended by Dean of Women, Helen Curtis. Facilities in all 

the women's dormitories are equivalent. 




^Me 




U/iiwxI/Jm <^ ^//^/iMa^A^J^i 




icnu&etfo 



June 5, 1953 



TO VJHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

This is to state that Miss Narzy Maia has completed 
all the requirements for the Master of Science degree 
at the University of Massachusetts, The degree vail be 
awarded at the June, 1954- Commencement. 




Gilbert L. Wood side 
Dean, Graduate School 



W/s 








is Rua Gomes Carneiro 155, 
the requirements for the 



reviously as I did not believe 
r the degree. 

ailed to submit her name in 
t exercises. As it is, will 
she has completed the requi- 
will be mailed to her adress 



(above) in June 1954 ? 

She will be on oampus until Sunday , June 7th. 



1 



Carl R. Fellers 

Head of the Department 



'<^<u 



1702 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 
Degree 



Hobart H. 
Ludden, 
Custodian of 
Military 



Room Rent 
Adams Hall 



Universit: 
was begun 
great. Tl 
gratitude, 

"On 1 
tend to D] 

It ui 

VOTED ; T( 
U 

i< 

Treas 
the United Sta1 
Custodian of ^i 
February 12, IS 
the University 
not name the Me 



Property 


VOTED; Tc 
tc 
oi 
Ci; 




Upon 




unanimously 


Room Rent 
Thatcher Hall 


VOTED; To 

dc 




ye 



Upon 

VOTED ; To increase the room rent of Abigail Adams 
dormitory from $130 to $165 per academic 
year. 

This action will make the rates for all women's dormi- 
tories equivalent to the rates in the self-liquidating dormitories 
as recommended by Dean of Women, Helen Curtis. Facilities in all 

the women's dormitories are equivalent. 




tJne Tu>0 



&/// w&n/i* 




Swimertlt 



June 5 , 1953 



department of Food Technology 

Dean G.L. Woodside - Graduate School 



Miss Narzy Male 



Miss Natfzy Maia whose home adress is Kua Gomes Carneiro 155, 
apto. 402 , Rio de Janeiro , Brasil, has completed the requirements for the 
Master of Science degree in Food Technology. 

I did not submit her name to you previously as I did not believe 
that she could complete the several requirements for the degree. 

I am sorry, for her sake, that I failed to submit her name in 
time so that she could take part in the commencement exercises* As it is, will 
you kindly mail her a statement to the effect that she has completed the requi- 
rements of the Master* s degree and that her diploma will be mailed to her adress 
(above) in June 1954 ? 

She will be on campus until Sunday , June 7th. 



Carl R. Fellers 

Head of the Department 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 



1703 



RUSTEE 



VOTED : To hold the annual budget meeting of the 

Board of Trustees on June 18 on the campus 
at Amherst. 



The meeting was adjourned at 1:15 P.M. 









cretary 



Chairman 



1704 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 6, 1953, 10:30 A.M., Butterfield Hall, Amherst, Mass 



Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brown, 
Cashin, Crowley, Donohue, Haigis, 
McNamara, Taber, Whitmore, Provost 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 



On the recommendation of the faculty and of the President, 



it was 



VOTED: To award the following degrees to the candi- 
dates listed on the attached Commencement 
program for 1953. 

College of Arts and Science 
130 Bachelor of Arts 
110 Bachelor of Science 

School of Agriculture and Horticulture 
71 Bachelor of Science 
2 Bachelor of Vocational Agriculture 

School of Business Administration 

71 Bachelor of Business Administration 

School of Engineering 

2 Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

2 Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

15 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

16 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
15 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

School of Home Economics 

52 Bachelor of Science 

Division of Physical Education 
13 Bachelor of Science 

Total - 549 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate 

School and the President, it was 

VOTED ; To award the following degrees to the candi- 
dates as listed on the attached Commencement 
program for 1953* 

College of Arts and Science 
11 Master of Arts 
53 Master of Science 
6 Doctor of Philosophy 

School of Agriculture and Horticulture 

2 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 
* 21 Master of Science 
6 Doctor of Philosophy 

School of Engineering 

2 Master of Science in Civil Engineering 

Scho o l of Home Economi cs 

3 Master of Science 

College of Arts and Science, School of Agriculture and 
Horticulture and School of Home Economics Cooperating 
1 Doctor of Philosophy 

Total - 105 

Provost Mather said that when the Graduate School faculty 
voted upon candidates for the degree Master of Science, they did 
not have before them the name of one candidate who has completed 
all requirements for that degree. The Head of the Department of 
Food Technology, in which the candidate majored, and the Dean of 
the Graduate School have both certified that Miss Narzy Maia has 
met all requirements and her name should have been presented to 
the faculty. The Provost said that even though formal faculty 
action is lacking, he recommends that the Trustees award the de- 
gree Master of Science to Miss Narzy Maia and it was unanimously 

* VOTED : To award the degree Master of Science to 
Miss Narzy Maia at the 1953 Commencement. 



1705 



1706 



TRUSTEE 



Veterans Ad- 
ministration 
Educational 
Contract 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson said that the educational contract with 
the Veterans Administration ends at Commencement time and it will 
be necessary to renew the contract to cover the summer sessions of 
the University beginning June 8. After discussion, it was 



VOTED: 



To authorize the Treasurer to sign con- 
tract Number V 300 IV-H32 with the 
Veterans* Administration providing for 
furnishing education and training to 
veterans under Public Laws 34-6 and 16 
for the period June 3, 1953 through 
September 18, 1953 and reimbursement 
therefore at the following rates for 
courses offered in the Summer Session: 

Tuition: Undergraduate (entire session) $80.00 
Graduate, per semester credit hour 10.00 
Special Courses (undergraduate) 4-0.00 



Fees: Student Health and Activities 



2.00 



It was agreed that the Trustee Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study would meet at 10:30 A.M. on Wednesday, June 17, 
in Butterfield dormitory prior to the convening of the full Board 
at 11 o' clock. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED : To prepare a letter to President Van Meter 
expressing the best wishes of the Trustees 
for his speedy recovery. 

His Excellency, Christian A. Herter, Governor of the 
Commonwealth, was escorted to the meeting by Trustee Vhitmore. 
Provost Mather presented a brief report on the scope and offerings 
of the University for the information of the Governor. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 A.M. 



Secretary 



Chairman 




RUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
June 17, 1953, 11:00 A.M., Butterfield House, Amherst 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Broderick, 
Brown, Cashin, Crowley, Desmond, 
Donohue, Haigis, McNamara, Taber, 
Whitmore, Provost Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



1707 



It was 



VOTED ; To waive the reading of the call and reading 
of the minutes of the last meeting. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following changes in the 
curriculum: 

1. Reorganization of junior-senior offerings in German 
Literature - recommended by unanimous vote of the 
College of Arts on March 19, 1953. 

2. To add Physics 27.(1) 28.(11) — General Physics as 
described below with the added qualification that 
the Committee recognizes this special course as 
available to all students including Physics majors 
who meet the necessary Mathematics preparation 
described in the catalogue listing. 

27 (I) 23 (II). GENERAL PHYSICS — This course is 

for students whose mathematical background includes 

a working knowledge of differential calculus and 

who have had or are currently enrolled in a course 

in integral calculus. The topics covered are 

essentially those of Physics 25, 26, with special 

emphasis on the mathematical development of the 

following topics: Statics, centroids, Gauss' 

theorem, dielectrics and A.C. electricity. 

3 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period Credit 4-« 

Prerequisite, Math. 5, 6 or equivalent. 

Currently taking Math. 31* 

3. That the recommendation of the Department of Economics 
for a change in title of the Economics 26 course now 
called Distribution to Economics 26 — Problems of the 
National Economy, be approved. 



New Courses 



1708 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The inclusion of a Fisheries Technology option for 
Food Technology majors, with a suggested curriculum 
as outlined by a special curriculum committee 
appointed by President Van Meter. The suggested 
curriculum was approved with the following comments 
of reservation relating to future planning: 
(a) Chemistry 34- - Biochemistry listed for the 
second semester of the third year cannot be offered 
until instruction at the level of Assistant Professor 
can be secured and an agreement reached among the 
Departments to shift Chemistry 79 to the second 
semester; (b) Catalogue course descriptions must be 
developed for Food Technology 73, and Food Technology 
74., listed as new courses in the first and second 
semesters respectively of the fourth years; (c) On 
query to Dr. Fellers who visited the meeting to 
answer questions, it was also suggested that Oceano- 
graphy proposed for the second semester of the fourth 
year be offered in some other Department of the Uni- 
versity; (d) It was pointed out in passing that the 
program allows 6 hours of elective - U in the second 
semester of the senior year and 2 in the second 
semester of the junior year. 

The option and suggested curriculum of a major in 
Food Management in the Food Technology Option were 
approved recognizing that catalogue course descrip- 
tions will have to be developed at an appropriate 
time in the future to cover new courses tentatively 
indicated as Food Management 67, and Food Management 
68 to be offered in the junior year of the proposed 
option. 

Recommendations for changes in course catalogue copy 
as suggested by the Department of Geology and 
approved by the School of Science were approved. 
These suggestions read as follows: 

"Both Geology 61 and Geology 62 are currently taught 
as Geomorphology. In both of these a certain amount 
of glacial geology is covered as well as other 
materials. It is proposed that the glacial geology 
be concentrated into the second semester and taught 
as Geology 62 Pleistocene Geology. Geology 61 will 
remain Geomorphology and also include subject 
matter now taught in Geology 62. With this arrange- 
ment of subjects, we feel that we can better serve 
our majors and be of service to other departments 
interested in specific terranal aspects. 



17' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

61 GEOMORPHOLOGY. (1954-55) - A review of recent 
studies concerning rock structures, weathering, 
streams, underground water, shorelines, wind work, 
volcanoes, and mountains. Field trips by arrange- 
ment. Given in alternate years. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit 3 

Mr. Wilson 

62 PLEISTOCENE GEOLOGY. (1954-55) - A study of 
Pleistocene world geology consisting of geological 
processes, land forms, existing and extinct glaciers, 
biota and stratigraphy. Field trips by arrangement. 
Given in alternate years. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period Credit 3 

Mr. Wilson 

52. (II) PETROLOGY should be changed to LITHOLOGY. 
This course is misnamed in light of common usage. 
The name dates from Dr. Gordon* s days before the name 
"Lithology" was in vogue. No change will be made in 
the course description or content of the course." 

7. After brief discussion of a recommendation of endorse- 
ment from the College of Arts covering a major within 
a Department to be called "English - Journalism" it 
was recommended that the entire matter of curriculum 
policy relative to Journalism majors be referred to a 
special committee. The Chairman suggested that before 
such a committee is established he would consider the 
entire problem with Dean Rand of the College of Arts. 

8. It was voted to approve the recommendation of the 
Romance Language Department that Italian be made 
available to underclassmen and redesignated in terms 
of numbering as follows: Italian 51> 52, should be 
changed to Italian 1 and 2. Italian 75 and 76 should 
be changed to Italian 25 and 26. (The numbers on the 
sophomore courses were changed from 21 and 22 as 
listed in the original memorandum from the Italian 
Department, to 25 and 26 in order to keep these in 
the normal sophomore numbering sequence.) Additional 
reservations or suggestions for this change were: 

(a) That School Deans should be notified that it would 
be advisable to restrict people to languages preferred 
in their Schools in case Italian does not meet their 
requirements; (b) That this change in course numbers 
still involves the general requirement that no credit 
can be given in a language course for the first 
semester until the second semester is completed. 

It was 



VOTED: To adopt the following Chemical Engineering 
curriculum: 



1710 



TRUSTEE 



Chemical 

Engineering 

Curriculum 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Freshman Year 



1st 6emester Cr, 

English 1, Composition 2 

Speech 3 1 
Math. 5, Analytical 

Geometry J+ 

Chem. 1, General 3 
Mechanical Engineering 1, 

Drawing 2 

Military 1 3 

Physical Ed. 3 1 



2nd Semester 
English 2, Composition 
Speech U 
Math. 6, Differential 

Calculus 
Chem. 2 or J+ t General 
Mechanical Engineering 

Drawing 
Military 2 
Physical Ed. 4 



Hi story 5 
German 1, 5 
French 1, 5, 15 
Spanish 1, 7 



Elect o ne of the following ; 
3 History 6 
3 German 2, 6 
3 French 2, 6, 

_2_ Spanish 2, 8 

19 



16 



Cr. 
2 

1 

A 

3 
2 

1 



3 

3 
3 

20 



Note: 1 - French or German is recommended for Chemical 

Engineers . 

Sophomore Year 



Chem. 29, Qualitative Anal. U 
Physics 27, Mech. Sound Heat 4- 
Math 31, Integ. Calcs k 
English 25, Survey of Lit. 3 
Military 25 2 

Physical Ed. 33 1 



13 



Chem. 30, Quantitative AbI. J+ 

Physics 23, Light, Elect. U 

Math. 32, Diff. Equations k 

Chem. Eng. 26, Calcs. 2 

English 26, Survey of Lit. 3 

Military 26 2 

Physical Ed. 34 1 

20 



Chem. 51, Organic 
Chem. 65, Physical 
Civil Eng. 34, Statics 
Ch.E. 55, Calcs. and Unit 

Oper. I 2 
Econ. 25, General 



Junior Year 



K 
U 
3 

5 
3 

19~ 



Chem. 52, Organic 
Chem. 66, Physical 
Civil Eng. 51, Strength 

of Matls. 
Ch.E. 56, Unit Oper. II 
Psychology 26 or Sociology 

28 



A 

3 
5 

JL. 
19 



Summer Following Junior Year (6 wks.) 
Chem. Engr. 75, Instrumen- Chem. Engr. 38, Unit Oper. 
tation 2 Lab. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Senior 1 ear 



RUSTEE 



Cr. 


2nd Semester 


Cr 


3 


Ch.E. 32, Ind. Equilibria 






and Minetics 


3 


3 


Ch.E. 94, Comprehensive 




1 


Prob. II 


3 




Ch.E. 92, Seminar II 


1 


3 


E.E. 65, Industrial Appli- 




3 


cations 


3 


JL. 


Electives-^ 


3 


19 




18 



1st Semester 
Ch.E. 81, Heat-Energy Rel. 
Ch.E. 93 , Comprehensive 

Prob. I 
Ch.E. 91, Seminar I 
E.E. 63, Elements of Elec. 

Engr. 
Ch.E. 89, Lab. Projects 
Electives^ 



Notes: 2 - Advanced military students will take Economics, 
Psychology, or Sociology as two of their senior 
electives. 
3 - Recommended electives include History, Government, 
French, German, Math. 33, English S3, Ch.E. 57, 58, 
95, 98, Chem. 77, 79, 36, 93, 94, M.E. 39, 46, Bus. 
Law 70. Other courses may be chosen with the approval 
of the Head of the Department. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED ; To promote Dr. Robert B. Livingston from 

Associate Professor of Botany to Professor 
of Botany at annual salary of $6180 
effective September 1, 1953. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED ; To amend the sabbatical leave policy of the 
University to read as follows: 

1. A leave of absence with pay is not an earned per- 
quisite; rather it is a period of freedom from 
academic duties granted by the Trustees to enable 
the recipient to devote the time to study, research, 
writing, travel or other equally meritorious pursuit 
to the end that through personal advancement he may 
serve the University more effectively. 

2. The opportunity for sabbatical leave shall apply to 
all staff members ranking as assistant professor or 
above, who have been in continuous service of the 
University for at least six years, and who upon re- 
turning from sabbatic would have six years to serve 
as a staff member before compulsory retirement. 
Sabbatical leaves shall be granted not more fre- 
quently than once in seven years. 



1711 



Robert B. 
Livingston 



Sabbatical 

Leave 

Policy. 



1712 



TRUSTEE 



Leave Without 
Pay 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3- The staff member will be limited to one-half year 
with full salary or a full year at one-half salary. 
For teaching staff, leaves shall coincide with 
regularly scheduled University semesters. 

U* No leave with pay shall be granted for salaried em- 
ployment, in this country or elsewhere, however de- 
sirable the experience. This does not preclude 
acceptance of scholarships, fellowship, or grants 
for which no services are required and where the 
financial aid is for the purpose of research or 
study. 

5. Any member of the staff wishing to avail himself of 
sabbatical leave should file his statement of in- 
tention with the head of his department at least six 
months before the leave is to take effect. If 
approved by him and the Dean of his School, it is 
then presented to the President for his approval and 
action by the Board of Trustees. A member of the Ex- 
tension or Experiment Station staff should file his 
request with the head of his department, who, if he 
approves, will present it through the Director of his 
Division to the President who will then place it be- 
fore the Trustees with his recommendation. Members 
of the Administrative Group make their applications 
directly to the President. 

6. In order that the leave may be of benefit to the 
University as well as to the individual's personal 
advancement, the recipient of such a grant must re- 
turn to duty for at least one full year of service 
immediately after the expiration of his leave. 
Failure to comply, obligates the recipient to return 
the leave-allowance money. In the matter of ex- 
tenuating circumstances, this repayment may be modi- 
fied or cancelled by the Board of Trustees. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED ; To adopt the following policy relative to 
leave without pay: 

1. Purpose of i*eave . On recommendation of the Depart- 
ment Head and the Dean of a School or College, a 
member of the faculty is eligible for leave without 
pay, other than military leave, only at the discretion 
of the President, for the following purposes: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a. A personal reason which involves travel, study, 
or research, and results in promoting the in- 
terests of the University as well as the employee. 

b. Sickness or maternity. 

c. Any other reason determined to be of mutual 
benefit to the University and to the individual 
concerned. 

2. Length of -^eave 

a. A leave is granted for a specific period of time. 

b. A leave of absence without salary normally does 
not exceed twelve consecutive calendar months. 

In no case may it exceed a maximum of twenty-four 
consecutive calendar months. 

c. For teaching staff, leave, except for reasons of 
health, shall cdbcide with regularly scheduled 
University semesters. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the Trustees usually vote 

each year to authorize the President to expend the income from un- 

earmarked trust funds. One year the amount voted was $1500 but 

usually it is $1000 which is approximately the total amount of such 

unearmarkad income. Last year apparently the University failed to 

request authorization for this kind of expenditure from the 

Trustees. Expenditures up to June 15 have amounted to $1,086.31 

as listed in the attached report. It is expected that expenditures 

between now and June 30 will amount to another $200. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED : To approve expenditures in the amount of 
$1,086.81 from unrestricted trust funds 
during the period June 1, 1952 through June 
15 » 1953 and to authorize the President or 
Provost to expend an additional $200 from 
unrestricted trust fund income during the 
period June 15 through June 30, 1953 • 

It was 

VOTED ; To authorize the President or Provost to ex- 
pend income from unrestricted trust funds in 
the amount of $1000 during the period July 1, 
1953 through June 30, 1954- 



1713 



Unearaarked 
Trust Funds 



1714 



TRUSTEE 



Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Trustees next considered the University budget for 
the year beginning July 1, 1954-* Treasurer Johnson said that the 
budget is initiated by the various departments, schools, and ser- 
vices of the University all of whom have the opportunity to submit 
their recommendations and requests in writing to the President 
through the Treasurer who acts as his agent in preparing the bud- 
get. The school deans and heads of services are also given the 
opportunity to appear in person to explain and defend their requests 
before the administrative officers of the University, 

In the absence of the President, the hearings were con- 
ducted by the Provost, the Secretary, and the Treasurer. Mr. Johnson 
said that every effort was made to hold the budget askings to the 
amount requested by the President last year. Certain new items, 
however, had to be given consideration. The items not in last 
year's budget total $419,192 and consist of the following: 

Reorganization plan $161,700 

New teachers 73,350 

Dormitory rentals 56,000 

Personnel to service new dormitories 9,790 

School of Fisheries 55,100 

Fuel, power, water, etc. 62,752 

The budget requests received from the schools, divisions 
and departments totaled $7,4-59,542- In conference with the school 
deans and other heads, this figure was reduced by $761,329 to the 
present recommended budget of $6,697,713 for operation and 
maintenance of the University. Total estimated revenue is 
$2,058,775 which would leave the net cost to the Commonwealth at 
$4.,638,938. After discussion of the budget and its component 
items, the Trustees agreed to defer action on the maintenance part 
of the budget until further study could be made of the reorganiza- 
tion plan and it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Disbursements - Unrestricted Endowment Funds 
For the Period July 1, 1952- June 15 , 1953 



Burnham Emergency 

George A. Marston — dinner for 2 guests 
Dinn t Hotel Statler ~ Trustee Meeting 
Advertisement in College and University 

Magazine for Business Manager 
Thomas J. Crowe - x-ray - Thomas Pierce 
Mass, Schopl Supts«, Assoc. - dues 
Kraushar Press « Printing Preliminary Report 
Butler & Ullman - flowers for funeral c 

Trustee W.. A. Orton 
Travel Expense Hugh Montgomery 
Frank M. Page, Inc. ' - Flower 3 for Bernard Smith *s 

Funeral 
Montgomery's Rose Garden - Flowers for Kranz 

Funeral 
Phi Beta Kappa - Fee for Membership 
Mrs. L. Price - 7 Luncheons for University 

Foundation Members 
Boarding Hall - 11 Luncheons for University 

Staff Members 
Lincoln Barnes - 6 Prints, Baker Hall 
Dean's Dinner Committee — dinner for 15 guests 
Mt. Pleasant Inn - meals for Recreation Conference 
Boarding Hall - 9 Luncheons t Trustee Meeting 
Boarding Hall - 17 Luncheons, Trustees & Guests 
R. J. McCartney * meals for Television Conference 

Total 



$ 4*90 

16,50 

2.30 

10.00 

5^00 

39* 50 

10*00 

16.19 
15o00 

10,00 

25-00 
3,05 

10-45 

3,00 
22.50 
23.71 

3.55 
26S75 

... ■ • fe- zi 

$264 * 69 



F. H. Read 



•v*M*vwMr**«vt 



Scholarship - Mildred Nyberg r 54 



£75,00 



YTm. Ro Session© 



w»it *m*m**m\F<£mi umthfii (lit 



Lord Jeffery Inn - Expenses of C, F. Byers, Florida 
Everett Kosarick • 132 photographs of Campus Bldgs* 
Travel for two 4-H Members to Rural Youth Conference 

in Virginia 
Mrs. Lc Price » guests at Dinner for Mrs. Eleanor 

Roosevelt 
Mrs. L, Price - 1 Luncheon for Dean Trecher 
Boarding Hall - Luncheon, V'ays & Means Committee 
Flint Prizes - 3 Prises, $30.00, $20.00 and $10.00 

Total 



27*09 
60.00 
50,00 

21,85 

.75 

11,40 

60.00 

#231,09 



Disbursements ~ Unrestricted Endowment Funds (Continued) 



William Wheeler 

Wellworth Pharmacy - 4K-135 Daylight (36 G) $19.#0 
Hea ton Bullock, Photographs of Dean Machmer 3*25 

(Print 3) 
Student Teacher Relations • Edw. Hazen 200*00 

Foundation 
Everett Kosarlcfc - Photographs of Mr. K* 1*50 

Johnson and Mr . W , Johnson 
Everett Kosarick - 5 Photographs of Mrs* 5*00 

Roosevelt 
Dean Marston • dinners at Wiggins & Faculty 7<>00 

Club for guests 
Everett Kosarick - Pictures of Campus Buildings 33*50 

and visit of Mrs. Roosevelt 
Everett Kosarick - Pictures of Buildings 10*50 
Dr. Norbert Weiner - Si^ma Xi lecture 50*00 

Mah-Winn Studios .- Picture of Wm. Machmer 6,00 
Oreana Merriam - flowers for Television 1.75 

Conference 
Frank Donovan, Jr. ~ Name Cards for 1«50 

Television Cards 
H„ I* Newell - Printing Map Captions 6 25 

Everett Kosarick - Pictures for Boston 15o45 

Exhibit 
Dr. Gordon B. Castle - Travel from Chicago' 144*03 
Lincoln Studio ~ 7 5x7 Glossies 7*00 

Everett Kosarick -' 7 reprints of air view of 3*50 

Campus 



Total $5l6o 03 



Total Disbursements - Unrestricted Funds 



June 15, 1953 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To authorize and request the Chairman to 

appoint a committee of 5 Trustees to study- 
possible salary adjustments and report back 
to the full Board. 

The Trustees then considered the proposed capital outlay- 
program of the University which covers a five-year period, and 
after discussion 

VOTED ; To empower the Trustee Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds to act for the Board in preparing 
a five-year capital outlay program. 

Chairman Whitmore of the Buildings and Grounds Committee 

invited all Trustees, whether or not they are members of his 

committee, to submit to him their comments and recommendations 

relative to the building program. The Trustees 

VOTED ; To approve the inclusion of the following special 
appropriation requests in the budget of the Uni- 
versity for the year beginning July 1, 1954-: 



1715 



Reimbursable government research 
Engineering research institute 
Training of medical students 
Commonwealth Scholarships 
Fire and safety alterations to certain 

buildings as required by the Department 

of Public Safety 
Parking area - Waltham Field Station 
Lacrosse and playing fields for Physical 

Education 



$50,000 

50,000 

6,500 

25,000 



50,000 
10,000 

10,000 



It was agreed that after the special committee on salary 
changes has its recommendations ready, a full Board meeting would 
be called early in August in Chairman Bartlett's Office 
(294- Washington Street, Boston). 

On the recommendation of the Graduate School Council and 
of Provost Mather, it was 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



1716 



Lotta Crabtree 
Fellowship 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To approve award of Lotta Crabtree Fellow- 
ship in the amount of $2,000 to Jean A. 
Felissier for the college year 1953-54-* 
Mr. Pelissier is a candidate for the 
doctor' s degree in Agronomy. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4,: 20 F.M. 






Secretary 



Chairman 



fRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
July 29, 1953, 12:30 noon, Statler Hotel, Boston, Mass, 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



ll ±4 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Broderick, 

Cashin, Crowley, Desmond, Taber, 

Whitmore, Provost Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

On the recommendation of the Executive Committee, it was 

VOTED: That the form of lease from the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts to University of Massachu- 
setts Building Association of a parcel of 
land for the erection of one student dormi- 
tory, all pursuant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 
333, as amended or supplemented, by Acts of 
1945, Chapter 390, by Acts of 1946, Chapter 
352, by Acts of 19^3, Chapter 135, by Acts 
of 1950, Chapter £U, by Acts of 1952, Chapter 
211, and by A c ts of 1953, Chapter 356, be and 
hereby is approved as presented to this meet- 
ing; and that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts, or a majority thereof, be 
and hereby are authorized, in the name and on 
behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
to execute, acknowledge and deliver, in or 
substantially in the form presented to this 
meeting, said lease of land from the Common- 
wealth to the Association and to cause the 
common seal of the University of Massachusetts 
to be affixed thereto. 

Chairman Bartlett reported that the lease form for one 

student dormitory recommended by the Executive Committee in its 

meeting on July 16 has been changed in amount. On July 16, it was 

expected that the annual rental of the next dormitory would be 

$29,000. It is now known that the annual rental will be *23,000. 

Consequently, it was 



Dormitory 
for Women 






1718 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: That the form of lease of one student dormi- 
tory by University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Association to the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts pursuant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 
383, as amended or supplemented by Acts of 
194-5, Chapter 390, by Acts of 1946, Chapter 
352, by Acts of 1943, Chapter 185, by Acts 
of 1950, Chapter 4-M, by Acts of 1952, 
Chapter 211, and by Acts of 1953, Chapter 
356, said building to be erected by said 
Association on a parcel of land to be leased 
to it by the Commonwealth, be and hereby is 
approved as presented to this meeting; and 
that the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, or a majority thereof, be and here- 
by are authorized, in the name and on behalf 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to 
execute, acknowledge and deliver, in or sub- 
stantially in the form presented to this 
meeting, said lease of one dormitory from 
said Association to the Commonwealth and to 
cause the common seal of the University of 
Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 

On the recommendation of the Executive Committee, it was 



VOTED: 



That the form of agreement for amendment of 
the Land Lease dated as of July 1, 194-3, and 
recorded with Hampshire Deeds, Book 1038, 
Page Vil , from the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts to University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Association, be and hereby is approved as 
presented to this meeting, said amendment to 
be consented to by State Street Trust Company, 
of Boston, Massachusetts, as Trustee under 
Trast Indenture dated as of August 15, 194-3; 
and that the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts, or a majority thereof, be and 
hereby are authorized, in the name and on be- 
half of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to 
execute, acknowledge and deliver, in or sub- 
stantially in the form presented to this meet- 
ing, said agreement and to cause the common 
seal of the University of Massachusetts to be 
affixed thereto. 



On the recommendation of the Executive Committee, it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the form of consent under the Building 
Lease dated as of July 1, 19^3, from Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts .Building Association 
to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts be and 
hereby is approved as presented to this meet- 
ing, the giving of said consent to be con- 
sented to by State Street Trust Company of 
Boston, Massachusetts, as Trustee under Trust 
Indenture dated as of August 15 > 194-3; and 
that the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, or a majority thereof, be and hereby 
are authorized, in the name and on behalf of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to execute, 
acknowledge and deliver, in or substantially 
in the form presented to this meeting, said 
consent and to cause the common seal of the 
University of Massachusetts to be affixed 
thereto. 

Chairman Bartlett reported for the special committee on 
the reorganization plan which met on July 16, 1953* The committee 
was composed of Trustees Bartlett, Cashin, Crowley, Boyden, 
Whitmore. He said that the committee was in unanimous agreement 
as to the need for revision of the terras of employment of members 
of the professional staff in Agriculture. Practically every land- 
grant college in the United States has already adopted a plan where 
by any staff member in Agriculture can be employed in teaching, in 
research, in extension, or other agricultural services at the 
discretion of the President of the University and the Dean of 
Agriculture. 

To adopt such a program for the University necessitates 
the employment of agricultural staff members on a 12 months' basis. 
At the present time, teachers are on a 9 months' basis; Experiment 
Station, Extension Service and Control Law employees are on a 12 
months' basis but receive the same salaries as teachers. 



1719 



Salary 
Levels 



1720 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman said that the committee agreed that the new 
plan of employment for Agriculture could not be adopted without 
raising the salaries of teachers who would move from 9 to 12 months' 
employment. It would also be necessary to increase the salaries of 
agricultural staff members currently employed on a 12 months' basis, 
so that professional employees in Agriculture would perform equal 
service for equal pay. 

The practice of paying more for agricultural employment 
on a 12 months' basis is common throughout the country. 

Chairman Bartlett said that the committee was also 
unanimously in favor of increasing the salaries for school deans anc. 
University administrative officers. The committee is convinced 
that current salaries are not adequate to attract outstanding can- 
didates as vacancies occur. The Chairman cited the current diffi- 
culty in filling the position of Arts and Science and also the 
difficulty in filling the positions of Treasurer and Provost. He 
said that filling these latter two positions satisfactorily had 
been largely a matter of good luck in view of the salary considera- 
tions involved. University salaries need adjustment now for the 
future good of the University. After discussion, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To accept the report of the special committee 
on reorganization as reported in the minutes 
of July 16 and to adopt the following salary 
schedule in Agriculture and the following 
salary schedule for school deans and admin- 
istrative officers. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED ; To authorize the entering of a bill as sponsored 
by the Trustee Committee on Legislation to amend 
Chapter 29, Section 31 of the General Laws so 
that teachers might be employed on a 12 months 1 
basis. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that Chapter 612 of the Acts 
of 1953 dissolves the Massachusetts Public Building Commission and 
creates in its place a Division of Building Construction in. the 
Commission on Administration and Finance. Hall Nichols, Executive 
Secretary of the old Commission, is now Director of the Division. 

Mr. Johnson pointed out that certain rights and responsi- 
bilities formerly pertaining to the Trustees are now the responsi- 
bility of the Commission and the Division of Building Construction. 
The Commission on Administration and Finance now names architects 
on the recommendation of the Division of Building Construction and 
employs clerks of the works approved by the Division. The Division 
of Building Construction, not the Trustees, handles construction 
contracts and payments. 

However, the University Trustees have the right to make 
recommendation of architects within 21 days of the time that appro- 
priations for construction are made. The Trustees cannot name 
architects after a period of 21 days. The Trustees also have the 
right to approve all plans and specifications developed by the 
architects. 

Mr. Johnson said that Mr. Nichols has always been most 
cooperative with the University and doubtless will do all within 
his power to continue to cooperate. 



1721 



Division of 

Building 

Construction 



1722 



TRUSTEE 



Five-year 
Capital 
Outlay- 
Program 



1955 Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Whitmore reviewed the 5-year capital outlay pro- 
gram for the University as prepared by the Trustee Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds on July 7, 1953- Minutes of this meeting 
were sent to all members of the Board. After discussion, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the capital outlay program as 
presented by the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds (See attached) 

The Trustees next considered certain special appropria- 
tions for the 1955 budget. Chairman Bartlett said that when the 
Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds considered the 5-year 
building program, it rejected certain items which the committee 
felt should be submitted as requests for special appropriations. 
After discussion, the Trustees unanimously 

VOTED: To submit the following requests for special 
appropriations in the 1955 budget of the Uni- 
versity. 

1. Poultry Plant Improvements at a cost of 
$73,000 detailed as follows: 

a.i Construction of 2-story laying house 
at Tillson Farm, $18,000. 

b. Construction of 2-story addition to 
poultry house #4 a "t the college poultry farm 
including equipment, $4-4,000. 

c. Construction of two turkey brooding and 
rearing porches, $5,000. 

d. Repairs to roofs and side walls of two 
bungalows at Tillson Farm, $6,000. 

2. An instructional power plant unit for Engi- 
neering to provide high pressure steam power 
for instructional purposes in the steam engi- 
neering laboratory, $30,000. 



42 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 



Each project is listed in order of priority by fiscal 
year. Each estimate includes construction costs, designers 1 fees, 
supervision, furniture, equipment, and site improvements. 

1955 

1. Women T s Physical Education Building $1,500,000 

2. Addition to Chemistry Building 1,725,000 

3. Plans for Classroom Building - Arts & Science 100,000 

4. Plans for Student Union Building 75,000 

5. Plans for Addition to Library 100,000 

6. Improvements to Utilities 365,000 

7. Garage and Service Building for Plant 500,000 
3. School of Fisheries Building- 300,000* 



§4,665,000 



* If the Legislature establishes a School of Fisheries, 
a building for this purpose would cost §300,000. 

1956 

1. Classroom Building for Arts & Science $1,900,000 

2. Addition to Power Plant 1,000,000 

3. Addition to Library 1,900,000 

4. Student Union Building 1,500,000 

5. Vegetable Gardening Building & Greenhouses 225,000 



§6,525,000 



1957 



1. Addition to Food Technology Building § 475,000 

2. Natural Resources Building 1,000,000 

3. Addition, and Improvements to Marshall Hall 900,000 

4. Addition to Clark Hall - Botany £00,000 

5. Animal Industries Building £00,000 

6. Plans for Infirmary 60,000 



& 



§4,035,000 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM Cont'd. 



1959 



195S 



1. Infirmary $1,000,000 

2. Agricultural Engineering Building 350,000 

3. Plant Science Unit (2 buildings) 1,500,000 

4. Fine Arts Building 1,000,000 

5. Animal Industries Research Barn 100,000 

6. Conservation Storage Building 225,000 



,175,000 



1. Classroom Building $1,000,000 

2. Administration Building 950,000 

3. Land Purchase 150,000 

4. Gymnasium - Physical Education for Men 1,500,000 
5# Service Building and Garage for Farm 300,000 

$3,900,000 



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195 Chemistry 

19' Soi» 



■ ,-- * 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Trustees again reviewed the maintenance budget of the 

University for 1955* This budget was first discussed on June 17, 

1953 and final consideration was deferred until after the report 

of the special committee on reorganization. After further 

discussion and review, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve a University budget for 1955 in 

the amount of $6,697,713 for general maintenance. 

On the recommendation of the University Scholarship 

Committee and of the Provost, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To award 25 Commonwealth scholarships to 
freshman students in accordance with the 
attached list. 

It was also unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the following list of alternates 
to receive Commonwealth scholarships should 
any of the original 25 fail to attend the 
University or not need Commonwealth scholar- 
ship assistance. 

On the recommendation of the University Scholarship 

Committee and of the Provost, it was also unanimously 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth scholarships to the 

following five students as replacements for 
Commonwealth scholarship holders who have 
withdrawn from the University. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:4-0 P.M. 




<y [ _ S e c r e tary 



^<^^J\^»*^ScKAg^C 



Chairman 



1723 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



1724 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
October 21, 1953, 12M, Statler Hotel, Boston, Mass. 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT; 



His Excellency Christian A. Herter, 
Governor of the Commonwealth, Chair- 
man Bartlett, Trustees Boyden, Brett, 
Broderick, Brown, Crowley, Desmond, 
Haigis, Mrs. McNamara, Perry, Taber, 
whitmore, Governor's Secretary Harry 
Stimpson, Provost Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 
with reading of the minutes of the last 
meeting. 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To promote Ralph L. France from his present 
position of Professor of Bacteriology and 
Public Health to Head of the Department of 
Bacteriology and Public Health effective 
September 1, 1953 at annual salary of $7330. 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To promote Sidney ¥. Kauffman from his 

present position as Professor of Physical 
Education to Head of the Department of 
Physical Education for Men effective 
October 1, 1953 at annual salary of $7080. 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To name Harold M. Gore, Emeritus Professor 
of Physical Education for Men, effective on 
the date of his retirement - September 30, 1953. 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED : To name Gay T. Klein, Emeritus Extension 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry, effective 
on the date of his retirement - August 31, 
1953. 



1725 



France, Ralph L. 
Head Dept. 
Bacteriology 



Kauffman, 
Sidney W. 
Head Dept. 
Physical 
Education 



Gore, Harold 
M., Emeritus 
Professor 



Klein, Gay T. 

Emeritus 

Professor 



1726 



TRUSTEE 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



Educational 

Policies 
Council 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the University Scholarship 

Committee endorsed by Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth Scholarships to the 
following in the amount of $250 per year 
in substitution for awards previously made 
to students who have since withdrawn from 
the University or received other larger 
awards: 

John T. Mahoney of the Class of 1956 - 
substitute for John Bianchi of the Class 
of 1956. 

Mildred Nyberg (one year only) of the Class 
of 1954- - substitute for Betty Munch of the 
Class of 1954. 

John R. Gillander of the Class of 1956 - 
substitute for Edward Stewart of the Class 
of 1956. 

Provost Mather said that with the growth of the Univer- 
sity, he feels some additions are desirable in the membership of 
the Educational Policies Council which was established with the 
approval of the Board of Trustees as the legislative senate of the 
University. He felt that the Executive Secretary of the Alumni 
Association and the Dean of Men and the Dean of Women should sit 
in on the deliberations of this body and to offset the increased 
administrative membership, he proposed to increase the number of 
elected faculty by allowing the faculty of each school, college or 
division to elect one teacher to the Council for each 300 students 
enrolled as majors in the school, college or division. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED : To enlarge the membership of the University 
Educational Policies Council by adding the 
following three ex-officio members: (1) Ex- 
ecutive Secretary of the Alumni Association 
(2) The Dean of Men (3) The Dean of Women - 
and by allowing colleges, schools or divisions 
of the University to elect a representative to 
the Educational Policies Council for each 300 
students which that college, school or division 
has enrolled as majors. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion for the need of amending Chapter 29 f 

Section 31 which governs the length of the annual service of 

teachers in order to accomplish the objectives of the agricultural 

reorganization plan. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Legislative Committee of the 
Board of Trustees to prepare an amendment to 
Chapter 29 > Section 31 to accomplish the pur- 
poses of agricultural reorganization by allow- 
ing the employment of teachers either for the 
academic year or for the full calendar year. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the contract with the Western 
Massachusetts Electric Company has expired after having been in 
force for about ten years. The new contract offered provides for 
higher rates than were obtainable ten years ago but the rates are 
in accordance with general schedule B-3 as approved by the Depart- 
ment of Public Utilities. There is a provision in the contract 
by which the Western Massachusetts Electric Company would provide 
standby service without charge during the winter months but with 
the condition that if demand is placed upon the company during the 
winter period, the University will be required to pay the company 
monthly for the rate so established for a period of two years 
following the demand. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to sign a contract 

with the Western Massachusetts Electric Company 
for electrical energy for the periods annually 
of May 15 to September 15, including provisions 
that the company will provide standby service 
without charge for the periods annually of 
September 16 to May 14. with the condition that 
no demand is placed on the company during this 
period and if demand should be established in 
this period the University will pay the company 
monthly for the demand so established for a 
period of two years following. The rates for 
electrical energy in this contract are in 
accordance with General Schedule B-3 that is 
in effect for this type of service to all in- 
dustrial users. The contract runs through 



1727 



Agricultural 
Teachers - 
annual 
service 



Electric 

Service 

Contract 



1728 



TRUSTEE 



Veterans 

Administration 

Regulations 



Army Reserve 
Officers 
Training 
Corps 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

September 15, 1956 and continues thereafter 
subject to 12-month notice of termination by 
either party. The effective date of the con- 
tract is October 16, 1953 • A condition of 
this vote is that the contract be approved by 
the Attorney General. 

Treasurer Johnson discussed the renewal of contracts for 
the Veterans Administration for education and training of veterans 
under Public Laws 34-6 and 16. Under Public Law 34-6, the Univer- 
sity will continue to receive $400 annual tuition for each veteran. 
Under Public Law 16, the Veterans, residents of Massachusetts, will 
be required to pay only the instate tuition of $100. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to sign the follow- 

— ■ ■ ■ ■ w 

ing contracts with the Veterans Administration 
for education and training under Public Laws 
34.6 and 16: 

Contract No. V300IV-H98 covering Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture for the period 
September 28, 1953 to May 30, 1954-. 

Contract No. V300IV-1496 covering Undergraduate 
Schools for the period September 18, 1953 to 
June 6, 1954-. 

Contract No. V300IV-1497 covering Graduate 
School for the period September 21, 1953 to 
June 6, 1954. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the University has been main- 
taining an Army Reserve Training Corps for many years as is re- 
quired of land-grant colleges and universities. However, a formal 
contract for this training seems to be lacking and the Army would 
like to formalize the arrangement with a contract. No new services 
on the part of the University are called for. After discussion, it 
was 



1729 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer to sign an agree- 
ment with the department of the Army for the 
continuance of a unit in the senior division 
of the Army Reserve Officers Training Corps. 

Trustee Brett, speaking for the Massachusetts Building 
Association, recommended that the Trustees authorize the Associa- 
tion to carry extended (windstorm) coverage insurance on the self- 
liquidating dormitories. He said the matter was brought to a head 
by the Tornado in Worcester and that such coverage could be obtained 
at a cost to the University of $176.32 per year over and above the 
amount reserved in the insurance contingency fund of the Building 
Association. The total cost per year for the windstorm insurance 
for all dormitories would be $1009.99 but the Building Association 
is able to carry all but $176.32 per year which would have to be 
paid by the University. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to place extended 
(windstorm) coverage insurance on/^.he self- 
liquidating dormitories. 

It was 



VOTED ; To accept with appreciation establishment of 
the Oscar G. Anderson Memorial Fund as an 
Endowment Fund of the University with principal 
of $1,000, the gift of Mrs. Anderson and friends, 
the annual income therefrom to be given to some 
worthy student of good character and in need of 
assistance for the purchase of textbooks 
necessary for his courses in the Department of 
Pomology, the selection of the student to be 
made by the Department of Pomology. The stu- 
dent may be a Stockbridge or four-year man. 
In the event that no student is eligible in any 
given year, two or more students may be se- 
lected the following year. In the event that 
any student receiving this assistance wishes at 
some future time to repay the money, the money 
should be added to the principal of the fund. 
Repayment should be encouraged but it is not 
to be a condition of the award. 



all 



Massachusetts 

Building 

Association 



(windstorm 
insurance) 



Anderson, 
Oscar G. 
Memorial 
Fund 



1730 



TRUSTEE 



Resolution on 
Reverend 
Florence J. 
Donohue 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the request of the Chairman, Secretary Burke read 

resolution on the death of the Reverend Florence J. Donohue, 

Trustee of the University, and it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the following resolution and 
direct that it be inscribed in the 
records of the ^oard. 

Reverend Florence J. Donohue 

Be it resolved that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts express their sorrow at the death of 
their friend and colleague, the Reverend Florence J, 
Donohue . 

Though his service as a University trustee was 
brief, he quickly won the admiration and esteem of all 
who knew him. 

Father Donohue 1 s genial personality, his keen 
enthusiasm, his friendly and heartening counsel, and 
his tireless devotion to the cause of higher education 
will ever be an inspiration to us. 

Chairman Bartlett said that the Trustees have been much 
concerned over the rapid growth of the University occasioned by 
the heavy demands for admission on the part of young men and women 
of the Commonwealth. They are concerned because the facilities 
of the University have not kept pace with the growth in the student 
body and the demands for admission. He called upon Provost Mather 
to state the conditions on the campus as they exist today. 

Provost Mather stated that the University has good, up- 
to-date, and plentiful housing facilities developed by the Massa- 
chusetts Building Association; that it is opening a brand new 
dining hall this fall built by the Commonwealth, so that housing 
and feeding facilities are adequate. However, the classroom 
building program has lagged far behind these facilities. The 

University is herding its students into worn-out, outmoded 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

firetraps and the situation worsens each year. The Women 1 s 
Gymnasium, a wooden structure, attempts to serve 800 of the more 
than 1200 women enrolled. Clothing is kept in a basement in 
grocery baskets stacked 8 feet high with completely inadequate 
ventilation. The Liberal Arts Annex . a former naval barracks, is 
a two-story wooden structure with wooden fire escapes through 
which the University sends 3>000 students a day. A similar 
wooden building burned to the ground in 20 minutes. Luckily the 
fire occurred at night when no one was in the building. North 
College « a brick and wooden building, erected as a dormitory in 
the 1800 j s is used for classrooms including its fourth floor. 
More than 603 students a day use the fourth floor. The 
Mathematics Building is another wooden frame structure of two 
stories, accommodating 1026 students a day. The fire escapes 
from the second floor are through windows. One professor's office 
in the building is accessible only through a bathroom. The Old 
Chapel, a stone structure, built in the 1800' s, and totally in- 
adequate for today's classes, is the headquarters of the Liberal 
Arts program. Twelve teachers have "offices" in the basement in 
rooms completely without windows or ventilation. The Chemistry 
Building erected in 1928 to serve 700 students has been outgrown 
for years. The Library is able to seat 5% of the student body 
when National Library Standards call for a seating capacity of 
35$« It has become a grand central station with students milling 
around looking for seats for required reading. 



173 



1732 



TRUSTEE 



Equipment 

Needs 



Capital 

Outlay 

Heeded 



Demand for 
Admission 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

For the last two years, the University has had annual 
appropriations of only $50,000 for equipment. Its total invest- 
ment in equipment is $2,000,000 so that annual appropriations of 
150,000 for 4-0 years would be needed just to replace present equip- 
ment. Microscopes that were purchased in 1910 are still in use. 
Many classrooms are too small for the sections now enrolled and 
some courses have had to be given up because of lack of facilities. 

These things are beginning to pull down the University's 
standards. Up to now the University has had an enviable reputation 
particularly in the field of science. A recent survey of 
scientists in Who's Who who have gone on for higher degrees beyond 
the baccalaureate indicates that the University of Massachusetts 
stood sixth in the entire nation regardless of size of institu- 
tions - public or private. The University's reputation in science 
and other fields cannot be maintained unless these changes are 
made. 

Provost Mather then presented recommendations for 
immediate emergency capital outlay required to take care of today's 
student body. He also listed the main items needed in the Uni- 
versity' s maintenance program for the coming year, (see attached) 

The attached series of tables were presented to show the 
number of births in Massachusetts for the period 1935 through 
19 50 j the estimated June graduates from Massachusetts public 
schools; the number of applications which this will bring to the 
University; and a projected enrollment of the University provided 
that the University continues to take 38.7% of the students who 
apply for admission - By 1961 the enrollment would pass 10,000. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Attached tables also show the capital outlay requests of the 
Trustees for the period 194-6 through 1955 and the amount appro- 
priated. They show the year in which major buildings of the Uni- 
versity were first requested by the Trustees and the year in which 
an appropriation for the building was made. 

Chairman Bartlett stated that the problem before the 
Trustees is whether to prepare the University for the heavy demands 
which lie ahead, and called upon the Trustees to express their 
opinion. 

Dr. Boyden stated that he believed firmly that the Uni- 
versity should prepare for 10,000 students. The demand for public 
education is rising. He said that some years ago a grammar school 
education was standard, then a public high school education. 
Since the war this demand is rapidly rising so that public educa- 
tion through the college level is coming to be expected. Private 
colleges cannot handle the load. They were unable to handle the 
veterans load after World War II and if the state does not prepare 
to meet the needs of its citizens, the job will not be done. 

Commissioner Desmond stated that the figures used by 
Provost Mather are very conservative. At the present time 11$ of 
the students at the University of New Hampshire are from Massachu- 
setts, \1& of the students at the University of Maine are from 
Massachusetts. Unless the state University grows, many who desire 
a higher education will not be able to receive it. He said that 
the demand for college education comes from industry, banks and 
employers generally. 



r\ *~ 



1734 



TRUSTEE 



Policy on 
Growth and 
Admissions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Trustee Uhitmore said that in considering University 
budgets, those concerned should keep in mind the income from stu- 
dents which reverts to the State Treasury. The amount requested 
by the Trustees for maintenance in the current budget of the Uni- 
versity is $6, 697,713 • However, receipts mostly from students will 
amount to |2, 058,775 which means that the net cost to the Common- 
wealth is about four and one-half million dollars rather than six 
and one-half million dollars. In addition to this, students are 
paying for the construction and operation of the dormitories. 
They are paying all their board costs and these factors should be 
taken into consideration in computing the amount that the student 
pays. The students are also taxed for their athletic program, 
concert series, for school publications and other items. 

Dr. Perry expressed the belief that the state university 
must prepare for larger numbers of students. The private colleges 
cannot enlarge enough to meet the demands. He stated that he was 
against a tuition increase, as an increase in the cost of 
publicly-supported higher education would defeat the democratic 
objective of developing and using talent wherever it nay be found. 

Dr. Perry presented a policy resolution and after 
discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To adopt the attached resolution on policy 
on growth and admissions. 

Trustee Brett spoke of the pressing need for a Student 
Union Building as an aid in alleviating crowded conditions. He 
said the students should have a recreation center with snack bars, 
game rooms, ballroom, and such other facilities as are usually pro- 
vided in a Student Union. He felt that this could be built by the 



f*-) 6 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Massachusetts Building Association on a self-liquidating basis at a Student 

Union 
cost of approximately one and a half to two million dollars. An in- Building 

come of $80,000 vould liquidate a building costing 1,6 million. 

Trustee Crowley* said that the Alumni have raised approxi- 
mately $100,000 as a World War II memorial. He felt certain that 
this fund could be used in the erection of a Student Union Building. 

In the discussion which followed, the Trustees agreed that 

it would be better to take out from the state capital outlay program 

a request for a Student Union Building in the face of the emergency 

demand for more classroom space. They felt that students would be 

willing to pay an annual fee of perhaps |20 for a Student Union 

Building and such fee is commonly assessed in other universities 

which have this facility. It was 

VOTED ; To remove the Student Union Building from 
the capital outlay program and request the 
University of Massachusetts Building Associa- 
tion to obtain authority from the General 
Court to construct a Student Union Building 
with a bond issue not to exceed $2,000,000. 

In view of the emergency conditions outlined by Provost 

Mather, the Trustees 

VOTED t To revise the 1955 capital outlay program 



1. By the removal of the Student Union Build- 
ing as voted above. 

2. By the inclusion of a classroom building 
at a cost of $1,000,000 to be placed in 
#2 position in the list, and 

3. By removing the School of Fisheries Build- 
ing from the list and inserting it only as 
a footnote. 

After this revision, the 1955 capital outlay program 



reads as follows: 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



1736 



TRUSTEE 



Security 
Research 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1. Women's Physical Education Building 

2. Functional Classroom Building 

3. Addition to Chemistry Building 

U* Plans for Arts and Science Building 

5. Plans for Addition to Library 

6. Improvements to Utilities 

7. Garage and Service Building for Plant 

Total 



11,500,000 

1,000,000 
1,725,000 
100,000 
100,000 
365,000 
500.000 
$5,290,000* 



(As Footnote only) *If Legislature establishes a 
School of Fisheries, a building will cost approxi- 
mately $300,000. 

On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Honorary Degrees, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To award the honorary degree Doctor of Laws 
to Leonard Carmichael at the 1954- commence- 
ment (June 6). 

It was also unanimously 

VOTED : To award an honorary degree to Alden C. Brett 
at the 1954- commencement (June 6) with the re- 
quest that the faculty on honorary degrees se- 
lect an appropriate degree for Mr. Brett. 

Provost Mather said that the University has been re- 
quested by Federal departments to undertake security research 
projects. To do this, those involved and the administrative 
officers of the University will need to have security clearance 
and be approved by the Trustees for such clearance. It was 

VOTED; To approve a security check of University 
officers and employees who may be involved 
in future security research projects and 
to authorize the University to undertake 
a program of security research. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4.: 30 P.M. 




ftg^A^Jk- W$ ex/veto^, 



Secretary 



Chairman 



Pt&ICT WtSmJJTLQti 



SB* areas the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts recognise their 
responsibility for the policy end program of the University as c 
land grant instj tutioa dedicated to providing a liberal and pro- 
fessional education at low cost and 

Whereas the said True tecs are aw&r© of the increasing numbers of 

qufiHfied young people of the Commonwealth who will bo applying 
for a&aissioa and study at the University in the immediate future 
and f or many years to come, and 

WhereeA a&i£ Trustees believe in maintaining the University at a high 
level of requirement and performance in recognized fields of 
inrvtructiOGL and research^ for the benefit and advancement of the 
h of the Ccaameawealth as its greatest present and future 
mrce 

Therefore be it resolved fch&t the Boi*r& of Trustees of the University 
of Uassechi* setts recommends that the University move forward at 
& rate prcportieriate to and govemud by the present policy of 

selective sdialssidas from qualified applicants » 

Be it further sfflrasd that the said Board of Trustees recognises an 
existent and emergency need for classroom facilities and equip- 
neat to provide adequate training for students not? enrolled at 
a standard comparable to the past reputation of tills institution 
and the- need for a State University in Massachusetts second to 
none, 

Therefore be it further resolved that this Board of Trustees recommends 

a program of limitation of immediate future enrollments based 
upon housing accommodations completed and authorized and upon 
classrooms and eqaipmait ncgded, to accommodate the numbers of 
ytjuag people currently admittedo 



As Trustees we pledge ourselves to accept the responsibility of 
supporting and furthering a program for the future envisioned by this 
policy of growth and progress « 



UltlYSRSm OF H&SS&CfflSESm 
October 21, 1953 

I ReC33Qmgnde& 1954-55 Budget Considerations 

&o SecsmnaRdatioi&s for iga ftft lafre and jrcgggg ncy . capital outlay 
policy* •» This budget only. 

1. Priiaary ssaph&sis on Capital Outlay par revised scheduler 



(I) Wonka's Physical Efcucatto Building $1,500,000 

'33 Itactiouai Classroom Building 1,000,000 

3 Addition, to Chemistry Building 1,725,000 

(4) Pitas for Arts and Sel«asa Building 100,000 

('5) Fifths for Addition to Libmry 100,000 

(8) bqpwreRLCSits to Utilities 365,000 

(?) Oaraga sad Service Building for Plant ffPfr.PQQ 

Total $5,290,000* 



(As Footnote caly) *If Legislature establishes a School of Fisheries, a 

building will cost approximately $300,000* 

2» Hove immediately to develop plans for a Student Union fee 
of $30 per student assesses" by Trustees Annually, as the 
alMetic fee is, to build a $5 million Union* Sell to 
fttttieats on extra-curricular cost basis » Self amortizing 
from f aes msdsr financing sponsored by Alumni Building 
Association* 

3« Main itasas in Maintenance Budgets 

&« Reorganisation Plan 

b c Hew Teachers 

e« Library Personnel and Books 

do Eojaipnont 

e» Educational Sullies 

f* Repairs 

go IoB*$J a erciipaent 

IS * Basis for Requesting Hew Borzaitori.es 

Etch je&r the Registrar prepares a flow chart of enrollment for the 
four year undergraduate course, On this registration is projected 
two or three years fcito the future* Predictions for the upper classes 
are based upon previous mortality figures, due consideration being 
given to contaosporary military and economic conditions., 

Batiaates for the freshm&n class are based upon the trend in fresbsan 
applications^ 



-3- 



as the flow chart indicates the need for new dormitories, they 
are co recommended*. 

For the lest several years dormitories have been built r&pldly 
primarily to alleviate a condition of overcrowing, For instcace, 
in the men's dormitories in the fall of 1951 we placed 235 sen in 
excess of the nora&l capacity. In 1952 the figure was 204 and in 
1953 it is Q0« 

She gradual increase in the sise of the freshmftn class has been a 
very conservative one considered frau the standpoint of application 
trends* Any increase in the freshman class builds the total garoll- 
meat up for four years as the class passes s$ titraug?* the senior 
year* 

lecesaaendations for dormitories must bo ms-de at least two years in 
advance of the time they are needed. HecoMnsodationa for dormitories 
have been based upon the assumption tfeat the state would provide the 
necessary classroom and laboratory facilities for a gradually grow- 
ing student body. 

Experience has shewn, however, that though ws can get dormitories 
within two years of the date they are requested, four to nine years 
may elapse before classroom and laboratories can be made available. 
For instance, the Ifcginsering Wing requested in 1951 will probably 
not bs reefy until the fall of 1955* the same is true of the Public 
Heal tit Building* In contrast Leach and Crabtree dormitories 
requested in the fall of 1951 were ready for occupancy in Uie fall 
of 1953, 

Ilia Admissions Policy 

The Massachusetts Bi^h Schools set a College recoaroending grade* 
In most Schools this is a grade of SO per cent where 90 per cent is 
passing* 

A student who mokes this recommending grade in all of his subjects 
is considered certified for admission without oxaminatlon. Such 'a 
student is accepted for" amission when he signifies that he wants to 
enter, provided he has covered the subject matter reqairsments for 
entrance*. 

Those applicants who have not made this recommending grade in all 
subjects are asked to take College Entrance Examination Board Exami- 
nations* Their admission qualifications are based upon the scores 
en these tests and the higji school record. 



V. 




G*A& 


IsiM. 


1541 


3709 


1682 


4259 


£DS:i 


6673 



I?« Admissions &ata 

Ac ^Applications Beqaosted (Freshman) 

1355 2168 
19158 2577 
19W 4585 

«These are applications mailed cute Those given out by tfte 
Admissions Qmcoware not included in these figires* Most 
applications are filed by U$y 1, Alter that date candidates 
are not oncoursged to file applications thougi some are 
received* 

B* Applications Received 



Xfluc 

5CM51 
51*52 
52*53 


!M$2 
1955 

1056 

19C7 


SSZft 

1Sj>7 
1693 
2309 


769 
1054 
1171 


1 


'ote* 




2276 
2747 
3480 




C» Freshmen Accepted 












50-51 

51-52 
52-53 


QMS. 
1955 

1956 

1957 


Boys 
639 
669 
750 


406 
«7 
420 


ToJoi 

1045 
1076 
1170 




B, Applications Received (Transfers) 

Xss£ Ssxa 3L-1& Ss&l 

50-51 362 122 484 
51-52 393 99 492 
52-53 404 91 495 


Accepted 

Bov$ Girls 

111 4S 

80 28 

95 26 


Total 
154 
108 
121 


E* Correspondence data 


(Letters mailed 


out) 








50 
51 
52 

Itarollmcn 


18*129 
19,913 
23,292 

t of Undergraduates, October 5 9 


1953 








Class 
1954 

1955 
1956 
1957 


Bovs 
387 
493 
624 
.759 

2254 


.quo* 

227 
273 
316 

a , ,.flrV. 

1236 




*ota* 
614 
766 
940 

3490 






Graduate Sttedsntm 
Stoekbridge Students 
Part-time 




Total 


291 

262 







BrtLflLWEtf 


Be /• | 




SftSta 


1964 


«*.*!' 




12 


1055 


14 




20 


193 1 


c<^ 

.'-«. 




12 


]L957 


"V- 




m 


Total. 


62 




73 


gfrg&BE Starts 


Boys 


Girjtji 


1954 




4 




1955 




3 





1956 




1 





issr 




I 





Total 




9 




Special Student* 




>*r«t 








16 


J : l 


Total 




■ : ,6 


15 



October 2, 1953 



LIVE BIRTHS AND BIRTH RATES 
FOR MASSACHUSETTS 



Years 

1935 
1936 

1937 
1933 

1939 
1940 

1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 

1945 
1946 

1947 

194^ 

1949 

1950 



Live 
Births 


Birth Rates 

per 1,000 

Population 


62,416 


14.3 


61,134 




61,272 




62,332 




62,575 




65,369 


15.1 


70,223 




33,371 




35,743 




73,140 




76,455 


16.9 


96 , 903 




106,690 




93,933 




96,041 




95,619 


20.3 



Note: Students b eing admitted to the University of Massachusetts 
each year from 1953 to 1961 are those being born in the 
groups above from 1935 to 1953. 



Source: P.D.#1, Annual Report of the 

/ Vital Statistics of Massachusetts 
for the year ending December 31, 1950. 



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October 2, 19 £? 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Appropriations for Capital Outlay Compared with Capital Outlr.y 
Budget Planning of the Board of Trustees and Dormitories 
Built by University of Massachusetts Building Associ- 
tion for Fiscal Years 1946-1954. 



Fiscal Year 
Ending June 30, 


Trustees 
Budget* 


State 
Appropriation** 


Bui lding 
Association* 


1946 


11,205,500 


$1,710,750 


$ 550,000 


1947 


3,915,025 


302,662 





1943 


5,079,500 


2,936,500 


339,305 


1949 


3,934,100 


753,500 


1,296,193*** 


1950 


3,954,550 


404,000 


— 


1951 


4,104,550 


731,000 


— 


1952 


5,239,450 


576,000 


316,333 


1953 


2,609,000 


2,609,000 


300,000 


1954 


5,074,000 


770 , 000 


1,000,000 | 


1955 


4,665,000 


--—. 









$10,343,412 


§4,352,331 



*Note: The Trustees have not budgeted any amount for 

dormitories since these are built by the University 
of Massachusetts Building Association, an alumni- 
sponsored corporation* 

**Includes transfers from contingency funds, 

***Includes ^417,429 for a faculty apartment house. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



October 2, 1953 



Major Buildings 
with Fiscal 



- Year Budgeted Compared 
Year of Appropriation 



Building 


First Year 
Budgeted 


Fiscal Year 
of Appropriation 


Home Economics 


1939 


1946 


Physics 


1939 


1946 


Service Building & Garage 


1939 


— 


Power Plant 


1940 


194S 


Research Barn 


1940 


mm mm 


Dormitories 


1940 


1943 


CLASSROOM BUILDING 


1941 


— 


ROTC Facilities 


1941 


1950 


Engineering Buildings 


1942 


194$ 


Infirmary 


1942 


-._ 


Waltham Field Station 


1942 


1946 


ADDITION TO CHEMISTRY 


1942 


— 


Plant Science 


1943 


— 


Animal Disease Control 


1945 


1946 


Auditorium 


1945 


— 


Armory 


1946 


— 


Addition to Food Technology 


1947 


— 


WOMEN'S PHYSICAL EDUCATION 


1947 


— 


Engineering Building 


194S 


1953 


Animal Disease Isolation 


1949 


1951 


Dining Commons 


1949 


1951 


Durfee Plant House 


1949 


1952 


Addition to Clark Hall 


1949 


— 


Veterinary Medicine 


1949 


Discontinued 


Addition to Library 


1950 


— 


Public Health Building 


1950 


1953 


Student Union 


1952 


— 


Vegetable Gardening 


1952 


— 


Agricultural Engineering 


1953 


— 



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BUDGET 1955 
UNIVERSITY OP I.IASSACIIUSETT3 

SUMMARY BY DIVISIONS 

• 

Administration $ 260, 148.00 

Instruction 2,935,717.00 

Extension Service 383,101.00 

Experiment Station , 577,825.00 

Control Services 361,890.00 

Operation of Plant 1,417,212.00 

Boarding Halls 761, 820.00 



OTAL BUDGET $6,697,713.00 



SUIHIARY OP ESTIMATED IITCOI.E AND EXPENDITURES 

BY DIVISIONS 





Estimated 


Estimated 


Net Cost 




Income 


Expend, 


to State 


Administrat ion 


5 


260,lij.8 


260,148 


Instruction 


499,300 


2,935,717 


2,436,417 


Extension Service 


500 


383,101 


382,601 


Experiment Station 


35,200 


577,825 


542,625 


Control Services 


137,800 


361,890 


224,090 


Operation of Plant 


543,475 


1,417,212 


873,737 


Boarding Halls 


81j.2,500 


761,320 


-80,680 


TOTALS 


* 

02,058,775 


06,697,713 


04,638,938 



October 7, 1953 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Estimated Maintenance Budget for Fiscal Year 
Ending June 30, 1962, Compared with Expenditures for 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1953 



1953 1962 

Division Expenditures Estimated Budget 

Administration $ 211,774.71 $ 367,115 

Instruction 2,337,363.32 6,544,795 

Extension Service 307, 764. #3 333,101 

Experiment Station 453,050.36 577,325 

Control Laws 314,971.03 361,390 

Operation of Plant 1,054,273.96 3,531,300 

Boarding Hall 474,912.69 2,322,910 



Total $5,209,110.95 $14,133,936 

Less: Income 1,330,753.25 5,636,500 



Net Cost $3,373,357.70 $3,452,436 



' ■! 



October 5, 1953 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Schedule of New Teachers to Meet the 
Estimated Increase in Enrollments 



Fall 
Semester 


Total 
Enrollment 


Net 
Increase 


New 
Teachers^ 


1950 


3,524 


— 


— 


1951 


3,616 


92 


2 


1952 


3,791 


175 


13 


1953 


4,032 


241 


19** 


1954 


4,493 


461 


35 


1955 


4,967 


474 


37 


1956 


5,391 


424 


32 


1957 


5,^61 


470 


37 


1953 


6,432 


571 


44 


1959 


7,614 


1,132 


91 


I960 


9,317 


1,703 


131 


1961 


11,037 


1,720 


132 



*Based on the established student-faculty ratio of 13-1 • 
The ratios for the last four years are: 



1950 

1951 
1952 

1953 



13.00 

13.25 
13.30 
13-62 



Total number of teachers 1953 
Number estimated for 1961 



296 
341 



**13 new teachers were budgeted and provided by the General 
Court. On the basis of 1953 enrollment, 6 more are needed. 



October 2, 1953 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Schedule of New Dormitories to meet the Estimated 
Increase in Undergraduate Enrollments 



Increase in Total 
Undergraduate Students* 



New Dormitories** 



Fall 
Semester 


Men 


Women 


Total 


Men 


Women 


Total 


1954 


217 
225 


144 
149 


361 
374 


1 


1 


2*** 


1955 


1 


1 


2 


1956 


225 


149 


374 


1 


1 


2 


1957 


222 


143 


370 


1 


1 


2 


1953 


253 


153 


471 


1 


1 


2 


1959 


650 


452 


1,132 


3 


2 


5 


I960 


962 


641 


1,603 


4 


3 


7 


1961 


942 


623 


1,570 


4 


3 


7 



15 



12 



27 



^Present ratio of 6 men to 4 women to continue. 

**Size of the dormitories to be fluctuated to house the 
number of students being admitted. However, for 
purposes of analysis, a size of 225 for men and 
150 for women through 1957 and thereafter 200 is used. 

###Dormitory #12 for women is under construction and 

Dormitory #13 for men is authorized with construction 
to start fall of 1953. Both of these dormitories 
are scheduled for completion for the fall of 1954. 
They are excluded from the totals. 



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